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Full text of "Report of the Board of Regents"

c 



Vol. V. 



UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO BULLETIN 



)o. 7 



THE 



UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO 

BULLETIN 



Report of the Board of Regents 

1909-10 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY, DECEMBER, 1910 
Entered at the Postoffice as second class mail matter. 



Vol. V. 



UMl 



UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO BULLETIN 



No. 7 



THE 



UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO 

BULLETIN 



I 

Report of the Board of Regents 

1909-10 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY, DECEMBER. 1910 
Entered at the Postoffice as second class mail matter. 



University of Idaho, Office of the Receipts of the Uni- 
versity OF Idaho. 

Moscow, Idaho, December 12, 1910 
To the Governor of Idaho : 

Sir : — I have the honor to present for your consideration 
the report of the Board of Regents of the University of Idaho 
for the period beginning January 1, 1909, and ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1910. 

MARIS E. LEWIS, 
President of Board of Regents. 



BOARD OP REGENTS. 

Maris E. Lewis, President Moscow 

Mrs. Samuel H. Hays, Secretary Boise 

Edward S. Sweet, Vice President Grangeville 

O. E. McCutcheon Idaho Falls 

E. H. Moffitt Wallace 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Maris E. Lewis Mrs. Samuel PI. Hays 

O. E. McCutcheon. 



I 






REPORT OF THE REGENTS 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO 



BDUCATION'IN IDAHO. 

The fathers of our State, in planning its educational 
system, planned more wisely than we are yet ready to give 
them credit for. We are too new, too near the beginnmg of 
things, as yet, to grant them the full measure of approval 
and appreciation for their work that history will eventually 
accord them. They built the system of education for the 
State to be used as a whole, handled as a whole, and if so used 
and handled they had faith that it would work out the fullest 
measure of good, educationally, for its people. 

The graded schools are scattered state wide, placing pri- 
mary and intermediate education within easy reach of every 
child. The secondary education of the Idaho youth is pro- 
vided for in the high schools which are now dotting every sec- 
tion of the State. This branch of the State educational 
system is supplemented at present by three schools supported 
by the State, each of which, however, has a special field to 
cover not included in regular high school work, such as Nor- 
mal work. Commercial courses, etc. In addition to these the 
Tenth Legislative Session provided for the establishment of 
Rural High Schools, thus extending the high school work to 
thickly populated country districts. For the higher education 
of the Idaho youth the single institution of university rank 
was established, thus completing and rounding out the sys- 
tem as a whole. In addition to these several schools, pro- 
vision has already been made for the education of the physical 



4 REPORT OF REGENTS 

and moral defectives, and in time the mentally defective will 
also be provided for. 

This, in brief outline, is the system as a whole. Note its 
completeness. Every grade of work from the primary to the 
Master's, or Doctor's, degree is provided for. Enough elas- 
ticity is provided in the laws to allow of all changes needed 
in the advancement of educational ideas and methods. Note 
the symmetry of the system. The foundation is laid broad as 
the State in the graded schools. In the high schools and 
the secondary State schools, while they are scattered as far as 
population will justify, they still aim to preserve the highest 
efficiency possible in their teaching force. This is done in two 
ways, first by assigning a single subject to a teacher as far as 
possible and thus securing a specialist in that subject, and 
second by enlarging the territory and taxable property tribu- 
tary to the school as far as possible, thus strengthening its 
resources and making it possible to get higher grade sp3c- 
ialists as teachers. Notable instances of this are seen at 
Twin Falls, Rigby, Wendell, and possibly other places, where 
districts are so large that bus lines are run to carry students 
to and from schools. This tendency towards central ization 
in teaching strength is State-wide and Nation- Vv'ide. The 
popular verdict seems to be that there is greater economy in 
furnishing transportation and conserving teaching strength, 
than in multiplying schools, duplicating teachers and equip- 
ment, and wasting educational resources and strength. This 
proves the wisdom of the founders of the State's educational 
system, in concentrating the State's efforts toward special 
and higher education in two Normal Schools for preparing 
teachers, one Academy for technical secondary training, and 
one University for higher education in all branches. This 
rounded out system, aimed to meet all the educational needs 
of the State, elastic to meet changed conditions as they may 



OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. D 

rise, and organized without a thought of strife or friction, 
should be looked at as a whole, treated and supported by the 
State as a whole. There should be no strife between schools, 
none between sections. The general interest in education de- 
mands harmony. The object of the entire system is to edu- 
cate Idaho youth. Each separate school has its work and its 
sphere of usefulness in this education. Each does its share 
as a part of a whole, and not as a separate unit of effort. No 
person should be connected with any educational work in 
Idaho who is not large enough to see this idea and work to 
this end. No person is big enough to long represent the inter- 
ests of education in any office in Idaho who works on any 
narrower plan. The central idea of this educational system 
should be kept in mind at all times, "to educate the Idaho 
youth," and each separate unit of the whole system should be 
urged and aided to do its part, in its particular field, to its 
fullest extent. The system is full and complete, and it is only 
by working in harmony that the best results can be obtained. 
The graded schools feed the higher schools and the State's 
secondary schools, and these, in turn, feed the University, 
which crowns the system. Any strife or lack of harmony be- 
tween the schools tends to alienate the graduates of that school 
from pursuing their higher education in the channels pro- 
vided by the State, and it also tends in a large measure to dis- 
courage the student from acquiring a higher education. This 
inter-school strife, particularly between the State schools, is 
in every way detrimental, and should be avoided as far as pos- 
sible. One of the most fruitful causes for this strife between 
the State schools in the last decade has been the manner in 
which the separate schools have been compelled to go before 

the legislative sessions to secure their appropriations. This 

condition could be greatly improved if educational bills could 

receive attention early in the sessions, or if the support of 



6 re:port of regents 

these schools could be placed on a tax levy basis, and so 
taken out of politics entirely. This latter would be much pre- 
ferred. 

The University is the only State in- 
THE UNIVERSITY stitution giving the Idaho youth a higher 

education. Idaho is fortunate in not 
having to divide its strength in this line between two or more 
institutions. On this account the usefulness and influence of 
the University must be state wide. Its usefulness and helpful- 
ness must reach every county, every community, and every in- 
dividual as far as possible. Every policy which tends otherwise 
must be weeded out, and every individual who is not big 
enough to work toward this end should have no connection 
with the University. 

The old university idea of providing instruction in the 
different lines and letting people come and attend school or 
not as they saw fit, and letting students attend lectures or not 
as they saw fit, is antiquated so far as State aided institu- 
tions are concerned. The modern university idea is to pro- 
vide instruction and laboratory facilities in the several lines, 
and then let the whole State know about it and ask them to 
come. If they do not come, rather than let any possible use of 
the learned men and apparatus lapse to waste, the idea is to 
come as near taking the University to the people as possible, 
so the State will derive the most possible good for the ex- 
penditures. This is done in three ways. By Extension Schools 
on special subjects, by use of the mails, and by conducting ex- 
periment work. 

The Regents of the University aim to adopt all of these 
methods as fast as the State will aid them in doing so. The 
publicity work is now being done to a limited extent by the 
gratuitous aid of one of the instructors, and the kindness of 
the press of the vState. Without funds, however, it is not of 



OF THE UNIVERSITY O^ IDAHO. 7 

as much value or instruction as it should be. A well con- 
ducted publicity department would greatly enlarge our student 
body and benefit the State. The Regents are putting in four 
Extension Schools on agricultural subjects this year. They 
are all in the southern portion of the State, as the need seems 
to be greater there. There is a short course carried at the 
University also. These Movable Schools are intended as a 
demonstration for the present year, and will ^erve as an intro- 
duction of the idea to the people of the State. It is hoped 
that the idea will be popular to such an extent that 
we will be enabled to put a school into each agri- 
cultural county in Idaho. These are intended for practical 
work only, and may in time be extended in length and spec- 
ialized in work as the demand warrants. The Regents are 
also in connection with the Government, keeping three travel- 
ing teachers, or demonstrators, on the road in the State all 
the time. They represent Irrigation, Dairying and Horticul- 
ture, and are available for helping to solve problems in their 
lines in any part of the State with headquarters in Boise. 

The mails are now used to circulate the bulletins describ- 
ing the results obtained in experimental work in agriculture. 
They are also used in answering inquiries on all subjects from 
all parts of the State. The Regents have wanted to start cor- 
respondence courses in a few subjects as the demand seemed 
to warrant, particularly those relating to agriculture, and have 
had it under investigation and contemplation for nearly two 
years, but were hampered by lack of funds. This work should 
be started gradually and enlarged as the demand came, to in- 
clude finally nearly all courses taught in the University. This 
could be carried on without much extra teaching force, but 
would require quite an initial outlay in preparing lectures, 
cuts and printed matter. 

Each department of the University should also have an 



8 REPORT OF REGENTS 

active ''queiy" bureau to take up and solve the problems of any 
resident of Idaho in their particular line. It is only in these 
ways that the State can get the full use and benefit of the 
learned men, and equipment, which has been assembled here. 
The Regents want it put to its fullest use at all times. 

In experiment work the Regents have put in, and are 
running in co-laboration with the Federal Government, 
sub-stations wherever there seemed to be special work to do or 
special problems to solve. In addition to the Station at Mos- 
cow, we now have sub-stations at Caldwell, Gooding, and 
Clagstone ,and have provided for one in Southeastern Idaho, 
which has not been located as yet. The work of these stations 
has been for good, and their number can be increased with 
advantage. In this connection I might mention that there 
has been a great demand for the starting of a soil survey of 
the State. In fact, a start has been made toward this work. 
This is of immense value to the agricultural interests, and 
provisions should be made to carry the work on and make it 
as comprehensive and complete as practicable. 

The last session provided for a Law School, which has 
been started and is a distinct success. There is a demand for 
a School of Pharmacy which could be started with a good at- 
tendance and be of benefit to the State. 

The annual cost of educating a student in collegiate work 
is between two and four times that of a similar education in 
academic grades. This is owing to the greater equipment re- 
quired in modern technical education, and to the higher salary 
list necessary in teaching the advanced subjects. 

Taking all these things into consideration, the Regents 
have felt hampered for years because of lack of appropriations 
for maintenance and buildings. This lack has been felt par- 
ticularly in the last four years when the demand for expansion 
has been so great in all lines. With the plans as outlined so 



OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. 9 

briefly above for the growth and extension of the University 
usefuhiess, in addition to the maintenance of all branches of 
the University as heretofore, they feel that a much greater 
amount should be appropriated, and that the University, as 
well as all the State schools, should be put on a mill rate basis 
for both maintenance and building purposes, and thus re- 
moved from the turmoil of politics at each recurring session of 
the legislature. We trust this course, and these suggestions, 
will meet with the approval of the executive and legislative de- 
partments of the State, and that the necessary action will be 
taken at the coming session to carry them into effect. 

THE DBFBATBD BOND ISSUE. 

The Tenth session of the Idaho Legislature passed a bond- 
ing bill giving to the University the sum of $73,000 for the 
following specific purposes : 

For completing- the Main building $60,000.00 

For completing the Central heating plant 4,000.00 

For land on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation 3,000.00 

For improvements at the Caldwell Station 2,000.00 

For a stock barn at the Moscow Station 4,000.00 

The bill provided that these bonds were not to be issued 
at once, but between the sessions, and their issuance depended 
on the payment of other State bonds, or the increased assessed 
valuation of the State, or both, bringing the amount of these 
bonds, when issued, within the constitutional bonding ability 
of the State. Pending the issuance of these bonds, the Regents 
had contracted for part of the improvements at the Caldwell 
station, for the north wing of the Main Building at Moscow, 
and had the building of the Central Heating Plant well under 
way. The purchase of the lands on the Coeur d'Alene Reser- 
vation is still pending and will be referred to in a separate place 
in this report, and the building of the barn at Moscow had not 
been commenced. At this stage of the Regents' proceedings 



10 REPORT OF REGENTS 

the constitutionality of the bonding bill referred to was ques- 
tioned by State Treasurer Hastings, and after a hearing on the 
same in the Supreme Court it was declared unconstitutional. 
In settling up the tangle thus created, the Regents completed 
the building of the house at the Caldwell station, providing the 
funds themselves for the final payment on this work, as in- 
stanced by the two obligations or orders, signed by the di- 
rector of the station, as herein shown. They ask an appropria- 
tion to reimburse them for this outlay as provided by the 
orders. 

Moscow, Idaho, July 23rd, 1910. 

Whereas, the Regents of the University of Idaho, depending upon 
the validity of the bonding measure passed by the Tenth Session of 
the Idaho Legislature providing for the bond issue of $73,000.00, made 
a contract for the completion of the house at the Caldwell Experiment 
Station Farm, and 

Whereas, the Supreme Court of Idaho has declared the bonding 
measure illegal, and 

Whereas, the house was contracted for, and has been completed, 
and in completing the same the amount of the funds available for the 
payment thereof has been exceeded by the sum of $160.51, which money 
has been advanced by the Regents of the University, to-wit: M. E. 
Lewis, Mrs. S. H. Hays, E. S. Sweet, O. E. McCutcheon, and E. H. 
Moffitt; 

Now, therefore, I, W. L, Carlyle, Director of the Idalio Experiment 
Station, having charge of the Caldwell Station, hereby acknowledge 
the receipt of the above sum of $160.51 from the above named Regents, 
and hereby promise to repay the sum above named, together with six 
(6) per cent per annum interest thereon from this date to M. E. Lewis, 
as Trustee for the said Regents out of any sum of money appropriated 
to my department for this purpose by any future session of the Legis- 
lature of the State of Idaho. 

(Signed) W. L. CARLYLE, Director. 

The. second order is similarly worded, is dated June 20, 1910, and 
is for $962.69, making a total of the two orders of $1,123.20 and interest. 

The contract for the north wing of the Main Building had 
been let to the Interstate Construction Company of Saginaw, 
Mich. After the defeat of the bonding bill, as stated above, 
this contract was cancelled, and final settlement of the account 
with the Construction Company is still pending. 

The heating plant has been completed as a direct heating 



OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. 11 

plant and is now in use. It was intended for a vacuum heating- 
system, and cannot be operated as economically as designed 
until the vacuum pumps and valves are installed. This should 
be done as soon as possible to save operating expenses. 

The third floor of the central part of the Main Building- 
has been finished and is in use. 

In connection with the opening of the Coeur d'Alene In- 
dian Reservation an act was passed by Congress allowing the 
Regents of the University to select 640 acres of land for use in 
connection with the work of the institution, which land was to 
be sold to the State for its use, and was to be appraised by 
the Secretary of the Interior for the purpose of making this 
sale, at not less than $2.50 per acre. The sum of $3000 was 
included in the defeated bonding measure for the purchase of 
this land. In due course the Regents visited the Reservation 
and selected the following lands to fill said grant, part being 
water frontage on the lake, and the balance timber and farm 
land lying northeast of Plummer. 

Description of Land: Lots 3, 4 and 5, and NEj4 SWj4» 
Section 25 Township 48, Range No. 5, w., W/2 NEj4 SW%, 
W>4 SE>4, Section 15, Township 47, Range 4 West; 606.4 
acres. 

This land was held for the University and its purchase is 
still pending. No word being received from the Government 
regarding the appraisement for some time, the Regents opened 
correspondence with the Secretary of the Interior, both direct 
and through one of the State's representatives in Congress. 
The amount of the State's appropriation was stated and the 
object of the grant. No reply was received till late this fall, 
when word came through the local land office at Coeur d'Alene 
that three appraisements of the land and timber selected had 
been made at the instance of the Secretary of the Interior. 
The first appraisement, made by the people who appraised the 



12 RI^PORT OF REGENTS 

entire reservation, amounted to $2,209.20. For some reason 
this did not seem enough to satisfy the department, and an- 
other appraisement was ordered. The value placed on the 
lands by this second appraisement was $8,933.70. This discrep- 
ancy between these two valuations was so g;-reat that a third 
appraisement was undertaken, which resulted in the value ot 
the land and timber being placed at $10,235.55. This lat- 
ter valuation seems to be the one selected by the Secretary ol 
*he Interior as his arbitrary valuation to the State for this 
land, and thus the matter stands. The Regents have no rec- 
ommendation to make. 

Ever since the fire destroyed the main building of the Uni- 
versity, it has been without an assembly room of sufficient 
size to hold the student body. The gymnasium was used as an 
assembly room up till the beginning of the present school year. 
The Regents had figured that the North wing would be com- 
pleted for use at this time, and had made arrangements for 
putting the gymnasium to its full use in connection with phys- 
ical education for both boys and girls. This added use has 
made it impossible for us to use this room for assembly pur- 
poses, and in order to accommodate the students they aic 
divided into three sections and assemble in the Y. M. C. A. 
rooms in this way. The use of the gymnasium at all times 
for physical culture has also crowded out the drilling of the 
cadets, and the practicing of such athletic games as serve 
to fit the students for spring athletic meets. The need of 
supplying a place for these exercises was imperative, and 
under the circumstances the Regents have allowed the erection 
of a large wooden annex on the north side of the Gymnasium 
building. This building has been put up almost entirely by 
money raised by private subscription, and will serve its pur- 
pose for several years to come. There seemed no chance for 
getting this money from the State, and the need pressed, so 



OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. 13 

the permission was granted. The Regents may be censured 
for granting permission to erect a wooden building among 
those built entirely of brick, but deemed this the wisest thing 
to do for the interests of the University. 

THE NEEDS OF THE UNIVERSITY. 

The needs of the University for general maintenance, arid 
departmental equipment, as set forth in the present report, 
may be briefly summarized as follows : 

General Maintenance (2 years), $60,000.00; Regents' 
Expenses, $2,000.00; Books and Shelving for the Library, 
$10,000.00; Timber Treating Plant for Forestry, $2,800.00; 
Equipment for the Mining Department, $10,800.00; Main- 
cenance of the Law School, $12,000.00; Books for the Lav? 
School Library, $2,000.00; Total, $99,600.00. 

The maintenance needs of the Agricultural Division, as 
set forth in a later section of this report, are itemized as fol- 
lows : Maintenance $3,000.00; Extension Schools, Farmers' 
Institutes. Agricultural Extension, and Field Work, $16,000,- 
00; Experiment and Sub-Stations in different localities, $40,- 
000.00. Total, $59,000.00. 

Buildings — With the exception of the finishing of the 
third floor of the Administration Building, and the erection 
of a small central heating plant, there ha^'e been no new build- 
ings at the University for two years, and already the ef- 
ficiency of instruction is seriously limited in several depart- 
ments for lack of room . The immediate needs of the Uni- 
versity for buildings, and permanent improvements, including 
more land for the farm, are as follows : Auditorium Wing, 
Administration Building, $75,000.00; Land and Barns, for the 
Agricultural Departments, $48,000.00; Dormitory for Young- 
Women, $80,000.00; Men's Commons, $30,000.00; Women's 
Wing, Administration Building, $45,000.00; Engineering 



14 REPORT OF REGENTS 

Building, $30,000.00; and a small hospital or infirmary. 
This list provides only for present needs, and makes small pro- 
\isions for future growth and expansion. If every building in 
the list w^as already erected and ready for occupancy every foot 
of floor space would be in immediate use every school day in 
the year. 

The plans for the uncompleted portions of the Adminis- 
tration Building include a large Auditorium for the regular 
student assembly, debates, lectures, concerts, etc. At the 
present time the largest lecture room on the campus holds only 
one hundred and fifty students, and the general assembly of 
all the students has been omitted from the program. For this 
reason we have not been able to invite any public lecturer, or 
speaker, to address the students since the year of the fire, 
1906. University debates, concerts and recitals are held down 
town at some distance from the campus. The first floor of the 
new wings also includes a lecture room for Civil Engineering, 
and a large lecture room and a laboratory for the Department 
of Physics. The second floor contains the young ladies' rest, 
study and lavatory rooms, and rooms for the Department of 
Biology. The third floor is planned for three large rooms 
for the Departments of Domestic Science, and Domestic Art, 
one lecture room for the College of Liberal Arts, and a large 
room for installing a University Museum. 

The entire Dormitory capacity of the University provides 
accommodation for only forty young ladies. No provision is 
made for the young men, and the present dormitory for young 
women will accommodate only one-third of the non-resident 
young ladies in attendance. As a rule the parents of intending 
students insist that their daughters on leaving home and en- 
tering the University are entitled to the conveniences and op- 
portunities for receiving counsel and supervision which a col- 
lege dormitory affords, When it is learned on application 



OF the: UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. 15 

that no rooms can be secured the young woman is usually 
required to remain at home, or to enter an educational institu- 
tion outside the State. The present restriction of dormitory 
accommodations for young women practically denies a con- 
siderable number of intending students the opportunity of ob- 
taining an education under the only conditions on which they 
are able to receive it. 

One of the greatest needs of the University is a men's 
dormitory, only one part of which, the dining room, or com- 
mons, can be asked for at this time. There are no adequate 
facilities for housing the young men in attendance at the Uni- 
versity. The fraternity houses are over crowded, and very 
fcAv private houses are built or equipped for receiving students 
as roomers. As for board, the students find it where they can, 
either in small boarding clubs, or in the restaurants of the 
town. There is no proper provision for supplying the students 
with plenty of good, wholesome, well-cooked food, at a low 
cost. These two things, proper rooming facilities, and proper 
boarding facilities, are fundamental in the life of the student, 
and therefore in the conduct of the University. The graduates 
of the University, knowing the conditions that prevail here, 
have levied an annual assessment on each member to supple- 
ment any appropriation made by the legislature for this pur- 
pose. The student body, by resolution of the Associated 
Students, are actively engaged in soliciting subscriptions from 
citizens of the state for the same purpose. 

At the present time, the Departments of Electrical and 
Mechanical Engineering occupy thirty-six hundred square 
feet of floor space. These Departments require at the present 
time a floor area of ten thousand nine hundred and fifty 
square feet. The area given as now available is calculated 
from actual measurements, and the estimate of space needed 
is the minimum that will satisfy present needs. No provision 
for future growth is made in this estimate. 



16 REPORT OF REGENTS 

ATTENDANCE. 

At the opening of the University in 1892 very few 
students were prepared for college work, as there were scarce- 
ly any high schools offering complete courses. Consequently 
the student body was of necessity for the first few years com- 
posed almost wholly of preparatory students, there being en- 
rolled in 1892-3 only six college students. During the first 
eight years, the number of college students had barely reached 
a hundred. Since then, however, the growth of the college 
department has been continuous and in recent years rapid. 
Along with this has been an encouraging decrease in the size 
of the preparatory department, owing, doubtless, to the re- 
markable growth of high schools throughout the State, there 
being now no less than 66 public high schools in the State 
which are visited by the Committee on Secondary Schools, 
of which 31 offer full four-year courses. Two years ago 
there were enrolled 202 preparatory students, last year 1^>.S, 
and this year, to date 112. 

The attendance for the last complete scholastic year, 1909- 
10, was as follows: 

SUMMARY OF STUDENTS 

College of Letters and Sciences: 

B. A 65 

B. S 33 

Music 47 

Domestic Economy 22 167 

College of Agriculture: 

Four-year Courses 35 

One-year dairy 10 

Winter Short Course 35 80 

College of Engineering: 

Civil Engineering 40 

Mining Engineering 39 

Electrical Engineering 22 

Mechanical Engineering 5 

Chemical Engineering (just organized) 106 



OF THE UNIVERSrrv OE IDAHO. 17 

College of Law: 

First Year 18 

Second year (first offered in 1910-11) 18 



Total Students under Collegiate Instruction 371 

Preparatory Students 165 



Total Students in University 1909-10 536 

The incomplete report of the present year beginning- 
September 21, 1910, compared with the prehminary report 
of one year ago shows a general increase of 25 in the Col- 
lege of Letters and Sciences, especially in the Domestic 
Economy course, a notable increase of 41 in the College of 
Agriculture, a slight decrease in the College of Engineering, 
99 to 86, an increase of 8 regular students in the College of 
Law, and the decrease in the Preparatory School noted above. 
The increase in the number of students under college instruc- 
tion has been almost uniformly 14 per cent, each year for the 
past five years. In 1910-11, however, the increase as com- 
pared with the corresponding date of 1909-10 exceeds 20 per 
cent. 

The percentage of women and men students in 1909-10 
was 29 per cent, and 71 per cent, respectively. In the year of 
1909-10 there were students in attendance from all twenty- 
three counties of Idaho, from thirteen other states and ter- 
ritories, and from two foreign countries. In 1910-11 thus far, 
there were registered students from twenty-two counties, 
sixteen other states, and one foreign country. According to 
the census of 1910, in the list of fifty-two states and terri- 
tories, Idaho ranks forty-sixth in population. In the list of 
fifty-one Agricultural Colleges in the states and territories of 
the Union, the University of Idaho ranks thirty-third in total 
attendance, and twenty-eighth in collegiate attendance. In the 
list of State Universities, Idaho comes thirty-fourth in total 
attendance and thirtieth in collegiate attendance in the college 
year 1909-10. 



18 REPORT OF REGENTS 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

In connection with the standard of admission and the re- 
quirements for graduation, the courses of instruction which 
are actually being taught in an institution at any given time 
afford one of the most important indications of its value and 
rank educationally. 

These numbered during the second semester of the year 
1909-10, one hundred and seventy-seven, a considerable num- 
ber of which are taught in tw^o or three sections ; and during 
the first semester of the present year two hundred and four. 

The subjoined table gives (1) the several ''chairs" or de- 
partments; (2) the catalogue number and title of the various 
subjects being taught this semester; (3) the number of credit- 
hours per week in each ; and (4) the number of students taking 
each subject. 

COURSES OP INSTRUCTION, FIRST SBMBSTBR 

1910-11. 

COLLEGE. 

No. of 

I. Greek. Credits. Students. 

Course 1, Elementary Greek 4 5 

3 Xenophon 4 5 

5 Plato 3 1 

II. Latin: 

1 Cicero and Livy 4 12 

la Latin Prose Composition 1 8 

3 Horace 3 5 

3a Latin Prose Composition 2 6 

5 Pliny 2 7 

III. German : 

1 Elementary German 5 35 

3. Intermediate German (two sections) 4 44 

5 Schiller 3 23 

7 Lessing 2 15 

9 Goethe 3 10 

13 Teachers' Course 2 9 

IV. Romance Languages: 

French — 

1 Elementary French 5 33 

3 Intermediate French 4 9 



OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. 19 

5 Seventeenth Century 3 8 

Spanish — 

1 Elementary Spanish 3 12 

3 Intermediate Spanish 2 1 

Italian— (Not given 1910-11.) 

V. English: 

English Language — 

1 Composition and Rhetoric (two sections) . . 2 96 

3 Composition (two sections) 2 54 

5 Advanced Composition 2 , 4 

English (School of Agriculture) 3 15 

English Literature — 

101a Nineteenth Century Authors 2 30 

101b Survey of English Literature from the 

the Earliest Times 2 55 

103 Shakespeare 2 30 

107 Poetics 2 4 

109 English Novel 3 13 

111 English Poetry of the 19th Century 3 3 

VL Public Speaking: 

(Not given 1910-11.) 

VII. History: 

1 The Early Middle Ages 3 43 

3 The Renaissance 3 9 

5 English History 2 10 

9 American Colonial History 3 10 

13 Historical Method 2 4 

15 Aspects of European Life 2 1 

VIII. Political Science: 

1 English Constitutional History 3 15 

IX. Law: 

lb Property 1 3 13 

3 Contracts 1 4 17 

5 Torts 2 16 

7 Procedure 1 3 13 

21 Property III 3 6 

23 Equity 1 2 6 

25 Public Law I 2 18 

27 Contracts III 3 11 

29 Procedure III 2 8 

X. Philosophy: 

5 Introduction to Philosophy 4 8 

XL Education: 

1 History of Education 3 12 

3 Educational Psychology 3 27 

5 School Management 2 14 

XII. Mathematics : 

1 Trigonometry (two sections) 2 65 

3 College Algebra (two sections) 3 68 

5 Analytics and Differential Calculus 5 18 

7 Integral Calculus 4 19 

XIII. Physics: 

1 General Physics (two sections) 3 54 

la Experimental Electricity 1 18 

3 Elementary Electricity and Magnetism 3 3 

5 Theoretical Mechanics 3 21 



20 RE:pORT 01^ REGENTS 

7 Electrical Measurements 3 2 

XIV. Chemistry: 

1. General Chemistry (three sections) 4 64 

3 Qualitative Analysis 4 17 

5 Carbon Compounds 5 5 

7 Advanced Quantitative Analysis 2 8 

Advanced Carbon Compounds 2 1 

XV. Geology and Mineralogy: 

1 General Geology 3 23 

3 Mineralogy (Sophomores) 2 8 

3 Mineralogy (Juniors) 3 7 

5 Petrology 2 5 

7 Economic Geology 2 6 

XVI Biology: 

7 Vertebrate Histology and Physiology 2 6 

11 Advanced Entomology 4 3 

13 General Botany 4 20 

15 Fungi 4 4 

17 Plant Anatomy and Physiology 4 4 

XVII. Music: 

Piano — 

la Freshman 4 5 

3a Sophomore 4 6 

5a Junior 4 2 

7a Senior 4 3 

Special 19 

Theory — 

lb Freshman Harmony 2 6 

Ic Theory of Notation 1 6 

3b Sophomore Harmony 2 6 

5b Melody-Writing, Form, and Counterpoint 2 • 2 

7b Counterpoint, Fugue, and Composition. .. . 3 3 
History — 

5c History of Music 2 2 

Vocal Music — 

Individual Instruction 12 

Choral Instruction 20 

Violin — 

Individual Instruction 13 

Orchestral Instruction 12 

Military Band 23 

XVIII. Drawing: 

1 Form Study 2 14 

3 Charcoal Drawing 2 2 

XIX. Domestic Economy: 

Domestic Science — 

lb Elementary Cookery (two sections) 2 30 

3b Food Lectures 2 18 

5b Junior Cookery 2 8 

7b Household Law 1 2 

lib Invalid Cookery 1 7 

13b Emergencies and Home Nursing 1 4 

15b Practice Teaching in Domestic Science. ... 2 1 

Domestic Art — 

la Fundamental Hand Stitches 2 22 



OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO 21 

3a Advanced Sewing 1 13 

5a Dressmaking 2 20 

7a Household Art 1 11 

9a Textiles and History of Costume 1 4 

11a Art Needle-Work 2 8 

13a Practice Teaching in Domestic Art 2 3 

XX. Physical Education: 

Men — 

A -Physical Training Classes (two sections) .... ' 75 

Individual Work 50 

Women — 

A Physical Training Classes (three sections) . . 103 

XXI. Military Science and Tactics: 

1 Regulations (two sections) 1 59 

3 Military Science 1 35 

XXII. Agricultural Chemistry: 

3 Soils and Fertilizers 2 1 

XXni. Agricultural Education: 

5 Agricultural Extension 3 2 

7 Agricultural Economics 3 7 

XXIV. Agronomy : 

1 Grain Judging 3 2 

3 Cereals 2 2 

7 Soil Fertility 4 2 

XXV. Animal Husbandry: 

lis Types and Breeds of Dairy Animals 2 4 

Breeds of Live Stock 4 25 

XXVI. Bacteriology: 

Is Dairy Bacteriology 2 6 

2 General Bacteriology 4 . 9 

XXVII. Dairying: 

Is Butter Making 3 7 

3s Milk Testing 2 10 

7s Dairy Practice 4 6 

9 Farm Dairying 4 8 

11 Advanced Butter Making 4 3 

Dairying 2 6 

XXVIII. Forestry: 

3 Silviculture 4 6 

5 Forest Protection 3 4 

7 Forest Utilization 3 3 

9 Forest Engineering 3 6 

11 Lumbering 5 3 

13 Forest Economics 2 1 

15 Timber Physics 3 6 

17 Forestry Seminar 1 18 

XXIX. Horticulture: 

1 Orchard and Garden Graft 2 7 

3 Practical Pomology 4 5 

5 Small Fruit Culture 3 4 

9 Horticultural Seminar 1 1 

11 Commercial Pomology 3 1 

13 Systematic Pomology 1 2 

Plant Life 4 25 



22 



REPORT OF REGENTS 



XXX. Veterinary Science: 

I Comparative Physiology 3 

Comparative Physiology 3 

XXXI. Miscellaneous Agricultural Subjects: 

Poultry 2 

Farm Arithmetic 3 

Farm Machinery 2 

Farm Motors 2 

XXXII. Civil Engineering: 

I Surveying 4 

3 Railroad Engineering 4 

5 Testing Laboratory 2 

7 Trussed Roofs 3 

9 Masonry and Foundations 2 

13 Roads and Pavements 2 

13a "Water Supply Engineering 2 

15 Bridge Design 4 

17 Reinforced Concrete 2 

19 Descriptive Geometry 2 

a Lettering 2 

XXXIII. Mining and Metallurgy: 

1 Assaying 2 

3 General Metallurgy 2 

5 Earth and Rock Excavation 2 

7 Mining Methods 3 

9 Economics of Mining 2 

11 Metallurgy of Copper and Lead 3 

13 Metallurgical Laboratory 3 

15 Journal Review 1 

Advanced Ore Dressing 2 

XXXIV. Machine Design: 

1 Mechanical Drawing 2 

5 Machine Design 2 

7 Electrical Design 2 

XXXV. Shop Work: 

1 Wood Working 2 

5 Machine Work in Iron ^ 3 

7 Machine Shop Practice 2 

Forge Work (Three sections) 2 

Bench Work (Two sections) 2 

XXXVI. Mechanical Engineering: 

1 Elementary Mechanics 1 

3 Steam Boilers 2 

II Power Plant Design 2 

Dairy Engineering 1 

XXXVII. Electrical Engineering: 

1 Electromagnetism and Dynamos 3 

5 Alternating Currents 4 

7 Electrical Laboratory 3 

9 Electric Lighting & Transmission of Power 4 

II Telephone and Telegraph 2 

13 Primary and Secondary Batteries 1 

15 Electrical Machinery 2 



6 
5 

24 
23 
15 
11 



21 

8 

14 

7 

13 

11 

9 

8 

8 

18 

51 



6 
6 
10 
7 
6 
7 
6 
5 
1 



6 
4 
4 



41 

8 

2 

26 

25 



3 

21 

3 

5 



4 
4 
4 
5 
3 
3 
5 



OF THE UNIVERSITV OF IDAHO. 23 

PREPARATORY. 

No. of 

1. English: Periods. Students. 

D Ninth-Grade English 4 18 

C Tenth-Grade English 4 20 

B Eleventh -Grade English 4 30 

A Twelfth-Grade English 4 27 

2. German: 

B Beginning German 4 40 

A Second-Year German 4 23 

3. Latin: 

D Beginning Latin 4 21 

C Caesar 4 17 

B Cicero 4 8 

A Vergil 4 16 

4. History: 

D Greek History 4 18 

C European History 4 10 

B English History 4 11 

5. Mathematics: 

D Elementary Algebra 4 20 

C Plane Geometry 4 33 

B Advanced Algebra 4. 19 

A Advanced Arithmetic 4 9 

6. Science : 

D Physiography 4 12 

C Zoology 4 23 

B Physics 4 32 

A Chemistry 4 13 

7. Business Course: 

C Bookkeeping 4 9 

HONORS FOR WORK IN ALL STUDIES. 

In October of this year the Honor List was again issued, 
covering the entire college work of the fourth successive 
graduating classes, and also the work of the three lower classes 
for the year 1909-10. In the list of Final Honors for the 
class of 1910 appear the names of four students who received 
"High Honors" based upon their total average for four years, 
and of seven who received ''Honors" for the same period. The 
standard of "Highest Honors" is set so high that not every 
year are there candidates for this honor, and such was the 
case in this instance. 



24 REPORT OF REiGENTS 

Of the Class Honors for the one year 1909-10, in the Class 
of 1911, nine received Class A Honors and three Class B 
Honors; in the Class of 1912, twelve received Class A, and 
four Class B Honors; and in the Class of 1913, thirteen re- 
ceived Class A and nine Class B Honors. In addition to these, 
in the College of Law three students in the First- Year Class 
received Class A Honors. The complete list is published an- 
nually in the University Catalogue. 

At the time of the establishment of the system of classified 
honors the fear was expressed by some that on account of the 
severity of the required work in the engineering courses stu- 
dents in those courses would be placed at an unfair disadvan- 
tage. The results as indicated in the Honor List most recently 
issued do not warrant that fear, since of the eleven students ob- 
taining Final Honors five were engineers, and the one who re- 
received the highest average for the entire class was a mining 
engineer. The recently established prizes of $75.00 each, 
awarded at the beginning of the Senior year to students in the 
College of Engineering, and based upon the scholastic work of 
the first three years of the course are also a stimulus to per- 
sistent effort in this very important department of the Uni- 
versity. 

REPORT OF SECONDARY SCHOOLS. 

In the college year of 1909-10 there were thirty-five public 
high schools in the State that offered a four-year course, and 
there were thirty-one public high schools that offered less 
than four years of study. In addition there were three State 
educational institutions that offered four years of work simi- 
lar to that given in the public high schools, and eight private 
schools, each of which offered a four years' course in sec- 
ondary education. Eight meml)ers of the faculty were ap- 
pointed to visit these seventy-seven schools. More than sixty 



OF THE UNIVERSITY 01^ IDAHO. 25 

of the schools were visited. With only two or three excep- 
tions the reports of the visitors revealed a satisfactory progress 
on the part of the secondary schools of the State. Salaries have 
been increased, additions have been made to the library and 
laboratory equipment, and new and better buildings have been 
constructed. The secondary schools are rapidly increasing in 
number, and it seems safe to predict that within two years 
there will be considerably more than one hundred of them. 
Experience has shown it desirable to increase the number of 
visitors and to lessen the number of schools that each member 
of the committee is expected to visit. It will then be possible to 
spend a longer time at each school and to come to understand 
its condition far better than at present. The relations between 
the secondary schools and the University are very cordial, in- 
deed. It is recognized on both sides that the visits are occa- 
sions of mutual helpfulness. The standard of instruction in 
the high schools of the State has been notably improved in 
the last few years, and, in many respects, it now compares 
favorably with that in any State in the country. Through the 
visits to the secondary schools the University has come to 
know the State and its educational conditions and needs much 
better than would have been possible otherwise. Every indi- 
cation points to the continuance of the present satisfactory re- 
lations, and to an increase of the mutual help for which they 
furnish opportunity. 

In June, 1910, the four-year high schools of the State 
graduated 321 students, and in the following September there 
were 136 new students admitted to the collegiate department 
of the University. Thus it is seen that the University enjoys 
the confidence of its constituency. The percentage of Idaho 
high school graduates who enter the State University more 
than equals that in older States where the educational system 
is highly developed. And when it is considered that the Uni- 



26 REPORT OF REGENTS 

versity of Idaho is confronted by a transportation problem 
far more difficult than that which many other State Univer- 
sities in the country are called upon to face, the number of 
our entering students will be seen to be unusually large. 

All the high schools in the State, those with four-year 
courses and those with less than four-year courses, graduated 
479 students at the close of the school year of 1909-10. In 
the succeeding school year there entered in the University a 
total of 229 new students. As we have seen, 136 of these en- 
tered for college work. The others entered the Preparatory 
Department, the one-year Dairy course, and the School of 
Agriculture. It will be seen, then, that the University draws 
practically fifty per cent, of the students in the State qualified 
to enter its various departments. It is believed that this show- 
ing is unique, that it cannot be duplicated by any other State 
University in the country. 

LIBRARY. 

The library is open Monday to Friday from 8 a. m. to 5 
p. m. Saturday from 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. During the Christ- 
mas vacation it is open three hours daily and in summer, not 
less than four hours per week. As soon as the steel shelving 
was set up, the library was moved from Morrill Hall. It was 
ready for use on December 2nd, having been closed three work- 
ing days. The new room is large, well lighted and ventilated 
and the library presents a very attractive appearance with its 
strong, durable and handsome furniture and its neat, plain steel 
stacks. As a result of its convenience and attractiveness and 
its increased facilities for meeting the needs of students the use 
of the library has greatly increased. 

During the school year 1907-08 2314 books and magazines 
were borrowed for home use; 1908-09, 2652; 1909-10, 2710; 
1910 to December, 1000. 



0^ THK UNIVERSITY OF' IDAHO. 27 

This does not form an accurate index to the increased use of 
the Hbrary, because the convenience and attractiveness of the 
room now induce many to use in the Hbrary books which were 
formerly carried home. No record of the use of books in the 
library is kept. 

The steel cases provided have added much to the economical 
and practical use of the library, but they are now full and the 
tops of some cases have to be used as extra space. To provide 
for the reasonable growth for the next two years twelve ad- 
ditional cases should be provided. A small amount of wall 
shelving is needed in the reading room for reserve books and 
the office should be provided with wall shelving, so that it may 
be used as a work room for the preparation of books for the 
shelves. The steel cases and the wall shelving would cost 
about $2,000.00. 

The money appropriated by the Legislature of 1909 for the 
library has been expended for books selected by the heads of 
departments and the library committee. In apportioning the 
funds the library committee of the faculty considered the vary- 
ing needs of the departments, their dependence upon the library 
facilities and the number of students to be directly and indi- 
rectly benefited. By placing the selection of books in the de- 
partments, the library has the benefit of the expert knowledge 
of the professors and at the same time grows systematically, 
the library committee keeping general supervision and buying 
books of general interest. Each book is selected with discrim- 
inating care and adds to the working value of the library, mak- 
ing it more efficient. There is no dead material to take up 
space. 

On January 1st, 1909, the accession record showed 6101 
volumes. On December 1st, 1910, it shows 12,236 volumes, 
an increase of 6135 and there is a large outstanding order 
for books not yet received. Of the 6135 books added, 654 are 



28 REPORT OF REGE:nTS 

gifts, 147 have been returned as loaned March 30, 1906, three 
have been found unclaimed, two replace defective volumes, 
605 are agricultural library books, 346 are bound magazines, 
1236 are law books purchased with the special appropriation 
for that purpose, and 3142 have been purchased from library 
appropriations. 

The library should be the center of the intellectual life of the 
University. No department can prosper without making free 
use of the best and latest books on its subject. Text books are 
not enough. As soon as they are mastered research work must 
be begun. This requires new and expensive books and tech- 
nical magazines, so that the newest and best methods and the 
latest thought of leaders and specialists on the subject may be 
studied. The student must be taught how and where to find 
what he wants to know. The acquiring of a fund of useful 
knowledge is but a small part of a University eduqation. By 
far the larger part is the ability to find and use needed informa- 
tion when it is wanted. This training can be had only through 
the use of a large and growing library. 

Many departments are entirely dependent on the library for 
their working material. History, English, modern languages, 
classics, sociology, political science, pedagogy and other de- 
partments have no apparatus, laboratories or. equipment except- 
ing the library, and their great need is for books old and new, 
and new editions of old books. The needs of the scientific de- 
partments are no less because they have apparatus, machinery 
and other equipment, for much of this becomes more or less 
ineffective unless supplemented by the use of books. The 
science of agriculture was never before treated in as many 
ways and from as many sides as now and the books on the 
subject were never before so expensive or so necessary. We 
must have them for the use of our students if we are to help 
them make the most of the great resources of our State. New 



OF the: university of IDAHO. 29 

processes and methods of mining are constantly being discov- 
ered and tried ; civil, electrical and mechanical engineering are 
making rapid strides; chemistry, especially industrial chem- 
istry, is advancing by leaps and bounds; in all lines of indus- 
trial and scientific effort new books and periodicals are being 
published which are absolutely necessary if we would keep our 
University working at its highest efficiency. 

The fundamental need of the University is a steadily grow- 
ing library. To this end an appropriation of $10,000.00 is 
asked for the next biennium. 

AGRICULTURAL COLLBGB. 

During the past two }/ears there have been many changes in 
the personnel of the Agricultural Faculty. The resignation of 
the Director of the Experiment Station; the changes in the De- 
partments of Horticulture and Agronomy, and the establish- 
ment of the Departments of Bacteriology, Forestry and Vet- 
erinary Science, effected an almost complete re-organization of 
this Department. 

There has been marked increase in the attendance of stu- 
dents in the regular College Courses in this Department,. The 
present year there are enrolled six Seniors, five Juniors, eleven 
Sophomores, sixteen Freshmen and three graduate students, 
making a total of forty-one in this Course. 

The one year Dairy Course has continued to be popular and 
efficient. The young men graduating from this course are in 
demand at good salaries as soon as they leave the institution. 
The work of the Dairy Department has been materially 
strengthened during the past few months by enlarging and 
greatly extending the commercial operations of the creamery, 
thus giving the students specializing in this Department a 
much more thorough training in practical work. 

The establishment of the Forestry Department has been 



30 REPORT OF REGENTS 

amply justified, as it has become one of the most popular 
courses in the institution, drawing some of the brightest young 
men in the University. Provisions will very soon have to be 
made for the accommodation of this Department in additional 
teaching force, laboratories and class rooms. 

The Bacteriological Department is also very popular and is 
supplying a much needed training in this very important 
science that touches so closely all phases of animal and vege- 
table life. 

The principal causes for the increasing interest in this De- 
partment, during the past year, of students lie, we believe, in 
the division of studies offered into several distinct courses *a- 
stead of a single course in general agriculture as was the case 
formerly. For the first time this year the work offered iias 
been divided into five distinct courses, consisting of annual 
husbandry, horticulture, forestry, dairying and agronomy. The 
studies in the Freshman year are practically the same for all 
courses, consisting almost entirely of the basic sciences and 
academic studies. At the beginning of the Sophomore year 
the student is allowed to select his group of studies under one 
of the five above mentioned groups or courses. 

There is a very urgent demand for the establishment of a 
chair of botany and plant pathology and which we hope will 
be added as soon as sufficient funds for the maintenance of 
such a course is available. 

THE PRACTICAL SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE. 

Recognizing that a very small percentage of the young men 
of the State can avail themselves of a high school and Univer- 
sity training and then return to the farm, there was offered this 
year, for the first time, a three year's course in practical a<^rl- 
culture, open to all young men who had passed the eighth 
grade in the common schools, or who would take an entrance 



OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. 31 

examination in the common branches of study. This school 
will be for six months during the winter of each year for three 
years, and, on the completion of the course of study, a certifi- 
cate will be issued to the students completing the work. 

The publicity campaign was begun August 1st. A series of 
multigraph letters to county superintendents of schools, high 
school principals, county clerks and county commissioners, 
alumni and ex-students of the University, and to promment 
citizens of the State yielded an up-to-date mailing list of three 
thousand names. A total of sixty-five hundred copies of a six- 
teen page catalogue of the School of Agriculture was pub- 
lished, and more than five thousand of these catalogues have 
been mailed or handed out for publicity purposes. 

Two storles^one on the farm machinery course, mention- 
ing the School of Agriculture incidentally, and one announc- 
ing that the School catalogues were off the press, and outlin- 
ing the general plans for the School — were given wide publicity 
in such agricultural journals as Western Farmer, Gem State 
Rural and Breeders' Gazette, and in the weekly and daily press 
of Idaho and Washington. The publicity obtained through the 
columns of the Breeders' Gazette resulted in inquiries from St. 
Louis, Missouri; Cleveland, Ohio; New York City and Win- 
ston Salem, North Carolina. 

Carrying a general University exhibit and especially rep- 
resenting the School of Agriculture, the Principal visited the 
County fairs at Blackfoot, Albion, Hagerman, Twin Falls and 
Lewiston. At two of these fairs the officials paid all expenses 
except transportation in return for services rendered as judge 
in the livestock departments. 

The school was advertised to open October 17th, and dur- 
ing the first week seventeen students were registered. Addi- 
tional registrations up to today bring that number to twenty- 
nine. The students represent widely separate communities, 



Z2 REPORT OF REGENTS 

are comparatively mature and their general attitude toward 
their work and the University indicates that they are here for 
a serious purpose. Student addresses are as follows : Boise 2, 
Hanna 1, Moscow 8, Tharp 1, Kendrick 2, Nampa 2, Rath- 
drum 1, Peck 2, Twin Falls 3, Total for Idaho 22; Lacrosse, 
Wash., 2, Endicott 1, Palouse 1, Spokane 2, 'total for Wash- 
ington 6; and Pueblo, Colo., 1. 

The age of the youngest student is 16, of the oldest 26, and 
the average age of all students registered is nineteen and one- 
fifth years. Two required examination, eight had finished the 
eighth grade, eight had completed part of the ninth, six had 
completed the ninth grade, one had completed part of the 
tenth, three had completed the tenth and one had finished the 
twelfth, at the time of registration. 

The course of study, as outlined in the catalogue, was modi- 
fied to fit the needs of the students and is now given as fol- 
lows : 

Recitation. Laboratory. 

Plant Life 3 hrs. 2 hrs. 

Breeds of Live Stocli 3 " 2 " 

Forge 2 " 

Bench Work 6 " 

Composition and Rhetoric 3 " 

Physical Education 3 " 

Farm Arithmetic 3 

Poultry 2 

Total 14 " 17 

It has been found advisable to schedule classes up to five 
o'clock Saturday afternoon. 

The services of Mr. Gardiner were secured four afternoons 
per week for the forge work. Mr. Osborne handles the bench 
work in wood in two divisions, giving each division four hours 
per week. The Principal of the School teaches the classes m 
breeds of five stock and farm arithmetic. The classes in plant 
hfe, composition and rlietoric, physical education and poultry 
are liandled respectively by Professors Wicks, Tull, Vander 
Veer and Nicholson. Those who had high school l^ig 



fc> 



OF THE UNIVERSITY 01^ IDAHO. 33 

lish and business arithmetic were excused from composition 
and rhetoric and farm arithmetic. In place of those subjects 
advanced dairy work is given by Prof. Frandson and physiol- 
ogy and histology by Dr. Chamberlain. 

The laboratory facilities in several of the departments of the 
Agricultural College are very inadequate. This is particu- 
larly so in the Departments of Animal Husbandry and Agron- 
omy. There is much need at the present time for a suitable 
barn for the housing of the college stock, with facilities for 
laboratory exercises in the selection, feeding and proper man- 
agement of the various classes of live stock. This need has 
been greatly emphasized since the establishment of the Prac- 
tical School of Agriculture. Whenever live stock exercises 
are conducted under present conditions, it is necessary to meet 
in the open air, which is a most disagreeable situation during 
the winter months. In the Agronomy Department also there 
is no suitable laboratory for training students in the selection 
and judging of grains and seeds, a study that lies at the very 
basis of their agricultural work. 

A course in farm machinery and farm motors has also been 
established during the past year, where students are given a 
thorough training in this very important branch of farm 
work. Practically all of our agricultural work in this West- 
ern country is performed by means of machinery, and it is ex- 
ceedingly important that the young men who are to have 
charge of our agricultural work in the future should have a 
thorough knowledge of modern machinery, particularly as it 
relates to motors of various kinds. A large warehouse build- 
ing in the city has been leased at a very moderate sum for the 
period of two years in which to give the laboratory exercises 
in this branch of the work. The large implement houses have 
very liberally donated the use of several thousand dollars 
worth of the most modern machinery for demonstration pur- 
poses. 



34 REPORT OF REGENTS 

FARMERS' INSTITUTES AND UNIVERSITY EX- 
TENSION. 

There has been a very encouraging interest manifested 
throughout the State during the past two years in this branch 
of College work. During the year 1909-10 there were con- 
ducted fifty-one Institutes, with a total of 159 sessions. In 
addition, members of the College Faculty attended seventeen 
special meetings, about the same number of school trustee 
meetings, and visits were made to twenty-five high schools 
and academies of the state. Nineteen of the Counties in the 
State were visited with these institutes during the year. For 
the future a somewhat radical change is contemplated in the 
character of this work. Instead of a large number of Insti- 
tutes being held with only a few speakers and for a day or two, 
a system of extension schools in practical agriculture is being 
given this winter for the first time in various sections of the 
State. Instead of a one or two days' meeting^those in attend- 
ance are given a full two weeks of thorough instruction in 
those subjects of greatest interest to that particular section. 
The work partakes more of the nature of a school where dem- 
onstrations are given illustrating the best methods to be fol- 
lowed. This feature of the agricultural work cannot be very 
greatly extended this year for lack of funds, but it is hoped 
that a sufficiently liberal appropriation may be made so that 
the University may be carried in a useful way to every portion 
of the State. 

During the past year provision was made in a 
FiEivD MEN small way for extending the work of the Agri- 
cultural Department of the University by send- 
ing traveling instructors into various sections fo the State. 
This work differs from the institute work and from the ex- 
tension schools in that these men go directly into the homes, 
the orchards, the fields and the stables on the farms, where re- 



OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. 35 

quested, and demonstrate the best methods to be followed in 
the various lines of agricultural effort. This work was started 
in a very small way, but with results that are most encour- 
aging. Provision should be made for at least four men in 
this field. One of these should devote his time to demonstra- 
tions and instruction in the best methods of irrigating farm 
crops and the proper use of water; another would find ample 
opportunity to occupy his time in the work of giving instruc- 
tion in crops and soils; a third and perhaps two in this field 
would return a big income to the State by devoting their time 
to improving the dairy interests ; while a fourth would be ex- 
ceedingly useful in the horticultural field. Many thousands 
of dollars are being spent annually in preparing land and 
planting orchards that will eventually be a total failure 
through a lack of knowledge and information that could very 
readily be given and gladly received on the part of a great 
many of the citizens of this State. 



EXPERIMENT STATION. 

The work of the Experiment Station has been materially 
enlarged and extended in scope during the past two years. 
With an almost entirely new staff of officers, this Department 
has been re-organized on a thoroughly practical and efficient 
basis. 

The Idaho Experiment Station was established, and the 
Federal appropriation of fifteen thousand dollars annually 
made available by enactment of the State legislature in the 
year 1892. This money, which has been designated ^'The 
Hatch Fund," has been utilized by the station from that time to 
the present. 

In the year 1906 Congress passed what is known as the 
Adams Act, appropriating five thousand dollars annually to 
each State and Territory, for the purpose of providing funds 



36 REPORT OF REGENTS 

for the carrying on especially of scientific research along agri- 
cultural lines. This sum, according to act, was to be increased 
annually by two thousand dollars until the total amount appro- 
priated to each State and Territory should reach the sum of fif- 
teen thousand dollars, which is the amount available this year. 
This fund, now known as ''The Adams' Fund," is restricted 
under the supervision of the United States Department of 
Agriculture to strictly research work, and may not be used' 
for executive or demonstration purposes, nor for the publish- 
ing of bulletins, improvements, or^eneral expenses of the sta- 
tion. 

The State of Idaho is one of the very few States in the Union 
that has not aided materially in carrying on the work of its 
Agricultural Experiment Station by direct appropriation. It 
is true that the last Legislature appropriated eight thousand 
dollars to provide for the equipment and maintenance for two 
years of auxiliary substations in various parts of the State, 
but, until the present, the State has done nothing to further the 
work of the central station at Moscow. 

The Experiment Station is, by Legislative 
ORGANIZATION enactment, a department of the State Univer- 
sity of Idaho, and under the control and su- 
pervision of the Board of Regents and the President of the 
University. Its executive officers consist of the President of 
the University and a director having direct supervision of all 
the work and expenditures. 

The station work is divided into six departments, as fol- 
lows : Chemistry, with three men ; Dairying, two men ; Ani- 
mal Plusbandry, three men; Horticulture, two men; Agronomy, 
two men, and Bacteriology, two men. 

In the Chemistry Department at present the 
LINES OF IN- lines of investigation under the Hatch Fund 
VESTIGATJON are: First, A study is being made of the 

chemical compositions of typical Idaho soils, 



OF THi: UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. 37 

Upon which subject a bulletin has just been published for free 
distribution. Second, A study of the chemical composition of 
the various Idaho fruits. Under the Adams' Fund the prin- 
cipal line of research is a study of the various factors influenc- 
ing the protein content of wheat. This is a very important 
subject to the farmer of the State, and one about which very 
little is definitely known. 

In the Dairy Department the principal lines of investigation 
at present are : First, The influences affecting the shrinkage in 
weight of butter from the time it leaves the producer until it 
reaches the consumer. Second, A study of the various methods 
of determining the water content of butter. Under the Adams' 
Fund, in conjunction with the Bacteriological Department, a 
critical study is being made of the factors influencing the keep- 
ing quality of butter. 

In the Animal Husbandry Department investigations are 
being made with various kinds of feeds in fattening swine. 
Forty-eight hogs are now on experiment, having been divided 
into four lots as equally as possible, each lot being fed a differ- 
ent ration. Accurate records are kept of the weight of the 
various rations consumed and the gains being made by each 
lot. A second experiment is also in progress to determine the 
most economical method of feeding dairy cows. 

In the Horticultural Department studies are being made in 
the cost of production and the best methods of growing all 
kinds of garden vegetables, a bulletin being now in press on 
this subject. Other lines of investigation are in progress in 
tomato and cantaloupe culture on a commercial scale, and 
the diseases affecting these important garden crops. Straw- 
berry culture is also being studied carefully, and a bulletin will 
soon be issued on this subject. Spraying investigations, look- 
ing to the control of codling moth and other orchard pests 
are also under way. Under the Adams' Fund the principal 
line of research is the improvement of several varieties of ap- 



38 REPORT 01^ REGENTS 

pies for Idaho conditions by cross-breeding. Last spring over 
four thousand blossoms were cross-fertilized, and over 
twenty-five hundred of the crosses were successful. It is 
confidently anticipated that from the seeds of these some new 
and improved varieties may be produced and the old varieties 
at least materially improved. 

In the Agronomy Department the principal studies are in 
the selection and growing of corn, the selection and growing 
of field peas, oats and barley, alfalfa, clover, etc. Experi- 
ments are also under way to determine the effect of the various 
methods of soil improvement by means of artificial fertilizers, 
manures and growing leguminous crops. Under the Adams' 
Fund a scientific laboratory study is being made of the exact 
amount of water required by the various plants for their 
growth and maturity. 

In the Bacteriological Department, under the Adams' Fund, 
an extensive investigation is being made of the various kinds 
of bacteria that develop in butter. The different kinds are 
being classified, their habits of growth, the good or evil ef- 
fects, etc., are all being carefully studied on an extensive scale. 
A second line of research is similar to the above, except that it 
is to be made upon the bacteria of the soil. It may be that in 
the very near future it will be determined that the greatest fac- 
tor in soil fertility, and the growing of maximum crops, will 
be found to be controlled almost entirely by the activity and 
favorable environment of these tiny plants that are coming to 
be recognized as among the most potent factors for good or 
evil in our civilization. 

SUBSTATIONS. 

At the l-'st session of the Legislature a small appropriation 
was made for the establishment of a number of branch or aux- 
iliary stations in different sections of the State where condi- 
tions were such that the investigations carried on by the Cen- 



OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. 39 

tral Station at Moscow were not directly applicable. Under 
this appropriation, stations were located at Gooding, in the 
South central portion of the State, and in the center of the irri- 
gated sections. The use of forty acres of very valuable land 
for this purpose, with water rights, was generously donated 
for a period of ten years. A number of very important experi- 
ments of interest to the farmers practicing irrigation farming 
have been started. This station is operated jointly with the 
University Station and the office of irrigation investigations 
of the United States Department of Agriculture. The ex- 
penses are borne equally by the two parties at interest. 

At Caldwell the work of the previously organized station 
has been continued and the problems to be solved definitely 
determined and started. 

At Clagstone, in Bonner County, in Northern Idaho, a third 
station was established on a 200-acre tract of land that was 
deeded to the University for experiment and demonstration 
purposes. Here the investigations have to deal with the clear- 
ing of stump land and the proper handling of the soil in order 
to render it fertile, as well as the demonstration of the most 
suitable crops for this section, and the best method of growing 
them. About twelve acres of land on this station have been 
cleared, some twenty-five acres partially cleared and made 
ready for seeding to grass, which will be pastured until the 
stumps have at least partially decayed. Many interesting prob- 
lems present themselves for solution in this section. 

There is a very urgent demand for the establishment of at 
least two more branch stations in the Southeastern portion of 
the State, where many problems concerning the practice of dry 
land farming are pressing for solution before the thousands of 
acres of land that are rapidly being brought under cultivation 
can be made to yield permanently profitable crops. The United 
States Department of Agriculture is co-operating with many 
of the Western States in this work, and the Secretary of Agri- 



40 REPORT O^ REGENTS 

culture has indicated his willingness to aid us, but we must 
take the initiative and be prepared to co-operate. 

The Experiment Station, as above indicated, is very liberally 
supplied with funds from the various Federal appropriations, 
but, owing to the restrictions placed upon the expenditure of 
these funds, they are not available for the use of these branch 
stations nor for demonstration work, but must be used to carry 
on investigations of a scientific nature. Unfortunately, in this 
State the agricultural practice is at least ten years behind the 
scientific information on the various subjects, and our agri- 
cultural population is clamoring for information in the form 
of practical demonstrations, while we are provided only with 
the means of conducting scientific investigations that must be 
demonstrated to be of the greatest practical benefit. The Fed- 
eral authorities have taken the position that it is the duty of 
the State to bring the results of these investigations to the peo- 
ple through the medium of the farmers' institute, the exten- 
sion schools, and the various demonstration or branch experi- 
ment farms. 

UNIVERSITY FARM. 

In securing the necessary land for the University farm and 
experiment station, it has been necessary in the past, owing to 
the paucity of funds, to obtain only those portions of land ad- 
joining the original small tract that could be secured at a mini- 
mum cost. The inevitable result has been that the University 
farm land is widely scattered, of very askew shape, and with a 
large number of small holdings jutting into the farm land on 
all sides, and some small tracts even in the center of the farm 
proper. Under these conditions, it has been impossible to make 
any definite plans for improvements, with the result that in- 
stead of a model farm, which should be an object lesson to 
the students and others interested, we have quite the reverse. 

During the past year we have been enaljled to secure options 



■ Ot" THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. 41 

on nearly all of these segregated holdings at very reasonable 
terms, looking forward to the taking up of these options with 
funds appropriated for this purpose. Until these small tracts 
are secured and the farm definitely laid out no system of rota- 
tion of crops, nor any definite plan of procedure can be fol- 
lowed looking to the improvement of the place. 

THE NEEDS OF THE AGRICULTURAL DEPART- 
MENT. 

One of the most pressing needs of the Agricultural Depart- 
ment is the providing of sufficient funds whereby its influence 
may be broadened and extended to all parts of the State 
through the medium of extension schools of agriculture, 
farmers' institutes, and the employment of thoroughly practi- 
cal and trained field men. 

A second great need is some means whereby demonstration 
farms or branch experiment stations can be established where 
the practical side of this work may be carried directly to the 
people in the various sections of the State most in need of such 
information. The State of Idaho, in its geographical lines, in 
its widely varying natural conditions, and its many peculiari- 
ties of soil and climate, is particularly in need of these features 
of University work. 

Additional provision for laboratory work in the Depart- 
ments of Animal Husbandry and Agronomy is greatly needed, 
so that the practical side of these very essential studies may be 
taught to students attending the University. There is an 
urgent need of a stock barn, equipped with all modern methods 
of feeding and caring for stock, and equipped with a large 
class room and laboratory, where students may assemble in 
comfort to study these subjects ; also a grain and seed labora- 
tory, where students may be given instruction in the selection, 
propagation and testing of seeds of all kinds. 



42 re:port of regents 

The State of Idaho is naturally adapted to the growing of 
livestock. Millions of dollars are annually expended by the 
people west of the Rocky Mountains in securing meat prod- 
ucts from the East. More provision should be made for co- 
operative demonstrations with farmers in various parts of the 
State in the feeding of livestock, thereby fostering this indus- 
try among our people, and supplying a much needed fertility to 
many of our soils, besides building up a most important in- 
dustry. 

TIMBBR-TRBATING PLANT FOR DBPARTMBNT OF 

FORBSTRY. 

The State of Idaho has a very large amount of lodge-pole 
pine, white and Alpine fir and other low-priced woods. The 
life of fence posts, telegraph poles, or railroad ties of this ma- 
terial, untreated, is less than seven years. The life of a good 
grade of cedar, untreated, is about fourteen years. By means 
of the use of preservatives, the life of the lodge-pole pine, fir, 
etc., can be prolonged for more than twenty years; thus our 
cheaper woods are brought into active and successful competi- 
tion with the highly valuable cedar. 

Many of the people of our State have access only to these 
cheaper woods, and in limited quantities; they would be glad 
to know how to prolong the period of their usefulness. This 
would mean a great saving of the timber, as well as lessening 
the amount of labor and expense incurred by frequent replace- 
ment. 

The erection, equipment and maintenance of the proposed 
timber treating plant, to be established at the University in 
connection with the Department of Forestry will cost approxi- 
mately $3000, itemized as follows: Storage tank, $200; re- 
ceiving tank, $200; treating cylinder, $500; pressure pump, 
$75; vacuum jnimp, $100; air compressor, $175; concrete ma- 



OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. 43 

sonry, $250; Fungus pit, $100; piping, $150; motor, $120; 
building, $250; shafting, $50; scales, furnaces, apparatus, 
$350; trucks and tracks, $100; open tank, $40; derrick, hoists 
and ropes, $40. 

The various uses to which this plant may be put are enu- 
merated as follows : 

First, The College of Agriculture and the Experiment Sta- 
tion may use it for demonstration purposes in the treatment of 
fence posts and other farm and building timbers subject to de- 
cay. 

Second, The School of Mines may carry on researches as 
to the comparative value of our native species used for mine- 
timbers when treated by various processes. 

Third, The Department of Civil Engineering may acquire 
information of great value to the people of the State by testing 
the strength of treated native timbers, concerning many of 
which no experiments along these lines have been made. 

Fourth, The Department of Forestry needs such a plant for 
demonstrating purposes, for use in classes in Timber Physics 
and Wood Utilization, and for research as to the best methods 
of treating many of the valuable, but so far little-used, woods 
of our State, regarding which' no information as to the value 
ot preservatives is available. 

MINING DEPARTMBNT. 

The last Legislature made an appropriation of $4000 to the 
Department of Mining for the purchase and installation of 
equipment. The most valuable mineral product of the State 
is silver lead concentrates. Hence it was deemed advisable to 
commence installing ore concentration machinery, to illustrate 
to the students the principles involved and also for the purpose 
of experimentation to develop machinery and processes to cut 
down, if possible, the present ore dressing losses. 

Since $4000 does not go very far in the purchase of ma- 



44 REPORT OF REGENTS 

chinery, and since the importance of equipping the department 
was recognized and emphasized by many of the large mining 
companies of Idaho, various of these companies gave to the De- 
partment of Mining equipment for ore dressing valued at about 
S4000, consisting of jigs of different types, trommels and slime 
tables, and with $2500 of the appropriation from the Legisla- 
ture these machines were installed in the Metallurgical Build- 
ing at the University. 

In this way a good start was made with the machinery illus- 
trative of the typical wet concentration process. But fine 
grinding machinery and apparatus for the saving of values 
from fine slimes are badly needed to make this division of the 
plant complete and of full service to the students, and to the 
mining industry of the State. At the present time an inves- 
tigation of the adjustments of the Hancock jig is being carried 
on by a post-graduate student. This investigation, when com- 
pleted, will provide data for the better operation of these ma- 
chines, and is but one instance of how the Department of M'r- 
ing, with proper equipment, may render valuable assistance tc 
the mines of the State. 

With the balance of the appropriation, $1500, experimental 
smelting furnaces were purchased and installed. These fur- 
naces are fired with crude oil and are furnished with air by 
a system of blowers and pumps drawing the fuel oil from tanks 
buried outside the building. These furnaces furnish excellent 
facilities for illustrative and experimental work in fire metal- 
lurgy. 

During the past year, by donations from the manufacturers, 
the Department of Mining got two rock drills of different 
types ; Init these drills, with the third which the department hid, 
are not of much use just now, as we have no supply of com- 
pressed air. Compressed air is one of the most im])ortant 
methods of distributing power in mines and equipment in rhis 
line is badly needed ; it is reco.nmended that funds be secured 



OF THE UNIVERSITY OE IDAHO. 45 

for the purchase of an air compressor equipped to afford every 
faciHty of testing it mechanically. We v^ould then be enabled 
to give our mining students the necessary practical instruction 
in this branch of mining and would also render useful for simi- 
lar purposes the rock drills we now have. 

To meet the demand for technical instruction in mining 
from men who are unable to take regular college courses, short 
courses are offered in co-operation with the Departments of 
Geology and Chemistry, for miners, prospectors, millmen and 
smeltermen. These courses commence January 9, 1911, and 
continue for eight weeks. At the present time, it is impossible to 
say how many will attend them, but requests for information 
have been already received from 75 residents of 38 different 
towns. 

So that we may turn out thorough engineers, who are able 
to cope with the problems likely to arise in the mining and 
treatments of the ores of our State, our laboratory facilities 
should be complete and illustrative of all the fundamental prin- 
ciples employed. The equipment for wet concentration is good 
but lacks facilities for fine grinding and for slime concentra- 
tion. We have no apparatus at all for concentration methods 
other than the wet methods, as exectrostatic, magnetic and 
flotation, and if we are to keep abreast of the times, our 
laboratories should be extended to embrace these processes. 
Then, too, we have no facilities for the tine grinding of ores 
and their treatment by the wet processes, as for example, the 
cyanide process, for the extraction of gold. This is of the 
greatest importance to the State, as there are many gold prop- 
erties which can be operated only by this process. It is the aim 
to develop the mining laboratories of the University, that in 
addition to being a class room for the instruction of its stu- 
dents, the laboratories will be able to make complete tests on 
any of the ores of the State to obtain the greatest economy in 
extraction. 



46 REPORT 01^ REGENTS 

In Idaho, at the present time, nearly all its mineral product 
is sent without the State to be smelted, very largely due to the 
fact of the high fuel cost in Idaho. With cheap electrical 
power, with which the State is abundantly supplied, there have 
been developed within the past few years, electro-metallurgical 
processes which successfully compete with those employing 
cheap fuel. To instruct our students in these processes, so 
important for the future of our mining industry, the equip- 
ment of a laboratory of electro-metallurgy should be begun. 
There has been no more important advance made in mining 
in recent years than in this direction, and our unlimited water 
powers should put the State at the head of this movement, and 
the need of laboratory facilities in this line is clear. 

The methods of mining and metallurgy are in a state of con- 
stant evolution. New processes and new machines make possi- 
ble a slightly increased extraction or a decreased cost. Every 
new process which enables us to treat economically an ore of 
lower grade than was possible before, adds to our resources, 
and one of the most promising ways to conserve our resources 
is to eliminate unnecessary losses in technical processes. Im- 
mediately we solve one problem, another is presented, so that 
our laboratory facilities must constantly grow and enlarge to 
keep step with the advance, and that our students may be able 
to direct this advance. 

The estimated cost of the proposed equipment for the De- 
partment of Mining is as follows : 

Air Compressor, Compound Steam, 2-stag-e air $1,800.00 

Wet Concentration, Hunting-ton Mill ($400.00), Fine Screens 

($:{.50.00), Classifiers ($250.00), Slime Tables ($500.00) 1,500.00 

Dry Concentration, Magnetic Machine ($500.00), Electrostatic 

Machiine ($500.00), Elmore & McQuestin Tube ($500.00) '1,500.00 

Leacliing- Process, Ball Mill ($800.00), Filter Press ($250.00), 

Motor ($.300.00), Tanks and Installation ($1,700.00), Pumps 

and Piping ($450.00) 3,500.00 

Electro-metallurgy, Motor Generator ($500.00), Transformers, 

Variable Voltage ($500.00), Furnaces, Resistance, Arc, and 
Induction ri50it.00) 2,500.00 



OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. 47 

MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

We submit herewith a table of areas now available for vari- 
ous uses by the Electrical and Mechanical Engineering Depart- 
ments, and estimates of areas now needed to carry on our work 
conveniently and satisfactorily. The areas given as now avail- 
able are calculated from actual measurements, and the esti- 
mates of space needed are for the minimum space that would 
properly satisfy present needs. No provision is made for fu- 
ture growth, nor for the materials-testing laboratories of the 
Civil Engineering Department, which are not now well pro- 
vided for, nor for a hydraulic laboratory, of which that depart- 
ment is in need. At least 2000 square feet of floor space should 
be provided for those laboratories, making the total space 
needed about 11,000 square feet. At present we attempt to 
accommodate in one room the machine shop, the electrical 
laboratory, the steam laboratory, engine and generator, and 
three large wood-working machines. 

Owing to the development of the Mechanical Engineering 
Department, and the increasing demands made upon that de- 
partment by the Agricultural Department and by the election 
of shop and laboratory courses by students of other depart- 
ments, an increase in equipment and in provision for main- 
tenance is much needed. Two additional double forges with 
anvils and small tools are needed in the forge shop, a grinder 
and two lathes are needed in the piachine shop, and large ad- 
ditions to the mechanical laboratory are needed. A table of floor 
areas now available and now needed by the Electrical and Me- 
chanical Engineering Departments : 

Available. Needed. 

Office 160 400 

Two Class-rooms 440 1000 

Elect. Lab. and Rotary Couverter 226 800 

Photometer Room 350 

Machine Shop 402 900 

Tool Room 72 200 

Steam Lab 120 500 

Engine and Generator 300 400 

Wood-working Machines 180 600 

Wood Shop 1700 3000 

Tool and Stock Room 200 

Wood Storage 600 



Totals 3600 8950 



48 REPORT 01^ REGENTS 

LAW SCHOOL. 

The College of Law was provided for by an appropriation 
made by the last session of the Legislature, House Bill No. 
309, approved March 12th, 1909. The Regents at their April 
meeting following created a Chair of Law at the University 
and Professor John F. MacLane was appointed to fill that rhair 
on the 11th day of May, 1909, his duties under the appointment 
to commence the first day of July following. Durmg the 3m> 
mer of 1909 a course of study was outlined, the essential books 
for a start towards a law library purchased, and in general 
preparations made for the reception of students. 

The department opened its doors with the other colleges 
and departments of the University on the 20th of September, 
1909. Instruction in those branches of the law which are 
usually taught to first law students was given during the 
academic year 1909-10. In April, 1910, the Board of Regents 
adopted a resolution by which the Department of Law was 
constituted a distinct College of the University. This resolu- 
iton is recorded on the minutes of the Regents for that meet- 
ing. At the same meeting Mr. J. F. Forney was appointed 
Professor of Law, and the appointment of an Associate Pro- 
fessor was authorized. The College of Law opened for the 
current year on September 19th, 1910, and is offering instruc- 
tion in the work of the first and second years of legal study. 
In addition to the staff of resident instructors, consisting of 
Professors MacLane, Durfee and Wilber, arrangements have 
been made for courses to be given by Mr. H. R. Smith, and 
Mr. Burton L. French, of Moscow. Regent McCutcheon is 
also assisting with lectures, and arrangements will be made 
during the year for lectures by some of the judges and promi- 
nent lawyers of the State. Several have consented to give such 
lectures, but the exact dates and sul^jccts have not as yet been 
arranged. 



OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. 49 

The attendance of the school, while not large, is satisfactory, 
in view of its brief period of existence. During the first 
year there were enrolled eighteen students pursuing law studies 
exclusively, and four students pursuing a partial course of in- 
struction, making a total under instruction of twenty-two. The 
registration to date for the current year 1910-11 shows an en- 
rollment of twenty-three students pursuing law studies ex- 
clusively, and fifteen pursuing partial courses of instruction, 
making a total of thirty-eight under instruction. This increase 
we regard as very encouraging, and as auguring well for the 
future of the college. 

The course of study, in accordance with the requirements of 
the better law schools of the country, covers three academic 
years of nine months each. In the preparation of the course 
three things have been kept in mind. First, the logical and 
historical development of the subject matter. Second, the ap- 
plication of the course to local conditions; that is, to the local 
law of Idaho in particular, and the Rocky Mountain and Coast 
States in general; and. Third, economy in instruction. The 
first year's work covers those subjects which are fundamental 
in nature, and essential to the understanding of the more 
specific topics of the second and third year. The work for the 
second and third year is generally interchangeable ; that is, it is 
so arranged that the subject can be taught in alternate years, 
thus, economizing the time of the teacher, and dispensing with 
the necessity for an additional class room. Exceptions to this 
rule are made, however, in those cases in which the logical de- 
velopment of the law requires one subject to precede another. 

The estimated cost of the Law School for the next biennial 
period is $14,000.00, $2,000.00 for books, and $12,000.00 for 
instruction. The item for books really seems necessary in 
order to equip the library as should be done for good work. 
We have gotten a very gOod start towards a law library, but 
the first $2,000.00 appropriated for that purpose was expended 



50 REPORT OF REGE:nTS 

for those books which seemed essential as a foundation for a 
law library, and $2,000.00 would be none too much to give us a 
fair working library commensurate with the needs of the 
school. The estimate of $12,000.00 for instruction is, as will 
be observed, $6,000.00 per annum for the two year period, and 
covers a complete Law School, with a teaching faculty and 
three classes of students. With a total of thirty-eight students 
under instruction, which will be increased next year by the ad- 
dition of one class, the estimate is not large. It is recom- 
mended that the Law School appropriation be a separate item 
of the Legislative appropriation, as in 1909. Provision should 
be made for an additional room for the use of the college next 
year. Our quarters are already cramped, three instructors 
using the same office, and there being but one class room, 
which is already occupied throughout the working day. An 
additional class room, and possibly an additional office, will be 
required next year. 

THE MEN'S COMMONS. 

One of the greatest needs of the University is a boys' dormi- 
tory; only one part of which, however, the dining room, or 
commons, it seems likely can be provided for in the near fu- 
ture. At the present time there are no adequate facilities for 
housing and boarding the boys. Not one of the private houses 
in which the students live was constructed with the view of 
providing students with proper facilities for living and for 
studies. The rooms, in nearly all cases, lack privacy. They 
are inadequately furnished. It is seldom, for example, that 
one finds a satisfactory desk or table for study. The rooms 
are poorly lighted and poorly ventilated; and many if not most 
of the houses are witliout a bathroom. Even in the fraternity 
houses, which, as a rule, are far better suited for student 
homes than are the private houses the conditions are far from 
satisfactory. The largest fraternity house contains twenty- 



OF THE UNIVE^RSITY OF IDAHO. 51 

four men. Three men live and study in each room. It will be 
granted that satisfactory results cannot be expected under such 
conditions. 

As for board, the students find it where they can, here and 
there, in little groups, or in the restaurants of the town. Every 
one of the boarding places is run solely with a view to profit. 
Provisions are bought at retail prices, so the charge is unneces- 
sarily high, and the fare is unnecessarily poor. 

These two things, proper rooming facilities and proper 
boarding facilities, are fundamental in the life of the students 
and therefore in the conduct of the University. They cannot 
be ignored. They affect the physical well-being of the stu- 
dents, their college studies, and their social activities. Dissat- 
isfaction with the present inadequate facilities is rife among 

the student body, especially among the non-fraternity element, 
which constitutes by far the larger part of the student body. 
This feeling is carried over into other phases of University 
life and activity, and it militates against the successful conduct 
of the University. Every day at the end of the college work 
the student body is split up into several hundred fragments. 
It is difficult to get the boys together for lectures, concerts, de- 
bates, or other evening events in the University buildings. All 
sense of unity is relegated to the background. This is an evil 
less prehensible than those of improper rooming and board- 
ing facilities but none the less serious. 

No part of a dormitory would be run for profit. Provisions 
could be bought in wholesale lots at wholesale prices. Room 
and board, therefore satisfactory in character, could be pro- 
vided at a less cost than that demanded at present. With the 
opening of a fine large commons — which would probably be 
the first wing of the dormitor}^ to be completed — the whole 
spirit of the student body would be greatly improved. Satis- 



52 REPORT OF REGENTS 

faction with the fundamental things of life would be carried 
over into the class room and out mto the State at large. 

STATE APPROPRIATIONS. 

Thomas Jefferson, the father of the University of Virginia, 
the oldest of the State universities, stated the general argu- 
ment for the State support of education in all its branches in a 
form which has convinced generations of American legisla- 
tures, and won acceptance throughout the United States. "I 
look to the diffusion of light and education as the resource most 
to be relied on for ameliorating the condition, promoting the 
virtue, and advancing the happiness of man. A system of gen- 
eral instruction which shall reach every description of our citi- 
zens, from the richest to the poorest, as it was the earliest, so it 
will be the latest of all the public concerns in which I shall 
permit myself to take an interest. Educate and inform the 
whole mass of the people. No other sure foundation can be 
devised for the preservation of freedom and happiness." 

There is now no discussion of the general proposition that 
the State should make adequate provision for the support of its 
school system from the kindergarten to the graduate courses of 
the university. There is, however, an administrative principle 
of great importance that is not universally recognized. It is 
not sufficient that the income of an educational institution be 
adequate from year to year ; it is essential, also, that it be made 
certain and calculable for a term of years. State taxes, that 
fluctuate greatly from year to year, are not good taxes, even 
though light. They are not good because they are not certain. 
Similarly, State appropriations, that vary widely from bien- 
nium to biennium for the same services, are not good appro- 
priations, even though generous. They are not good because 
they arc not certain. University plans should not be laid for 
today, but for today and tomorrow and tomorrow, not for a 
year, or a biennium, but for a decade and a generation. It is 



OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. 



53 



not easy to plan wisely where it is difficult or impossible to 
make safe predictions, and in the absence of an educational 
policy carefully planned for years in advance expenditures will 
not be economical, for the reason that they will be ineffective 
in educational result. Even if the Regents expend every dollar 
so carefully that one hundred cents' worth of value is secured^ 
the expenditure is apt to be uneconomical, for the reason that 
they can plan only for the present day and time, and not for the 
definite distant result. Permanent appropriations usually take 
one or two forms. First, an appropriation for maintenance, 
or buildings, or both, based on the assessed valuation of the 
property of the State. Second, an appropriation of definite 
amount fixed for a term of years in advance. 

Following is a list of the institutions which are partly sup- 
plied by a mill rate tax : 



Institution 



Rate 



University of Arizona 3-5 mill 

University of California... 3-10 " 

University of Colorado.... 2-5 " 

Colorado School of Mines.. 1-5 " 

University of Indiana 1-10 " 

Purdue University 1-10 " 

State University, Kentucky 1-20 " 

University of Michigan.... 3-8 " 

Michig-an State Agrl. Col.. 1-10 " 

University of Minnesota. . .23-100 " 

University of Iowa 1-5 " 

Iowa Agricultural Col 1-5 " 

University of Nebraska. ... 1 " 
North Dak. Agrl. Colleg-e.. 1-5 
University of No. Dakota.. 2-5 

Ohio University 1-25 " 

Ohio State University 16-100 " 

Miami University 7-200 " 

University of Wisconsin... 2-7 " 

University of Wyoming.... 3-8 " 

Colorado Agrl. College.... 1-5 " 

A few examples of state appropriations of definite amount 
fixed for a term of years in advance are as follows: 

In 1903 the Legislature of Wisconsin appropriated $200,- 
000.00 annually for three years to the University of Wiscon- 
sin for buildings and equipment. 









Total Annualln- 




Annual Yield 


come of Univers- 


Term 


of Tax 


ities in 1908 


Cont. 


$ 32,000.00 


$ 138,002.00 






883,978.00 


2,044,233.00 






150,000.00 


277,000.00 






73,000.00 


164,082.00 






160,000.00 


322,410.00 






173,088.00 


428,159.00 






47,000.00 


160,419.00 






779,709.00 


1,162,397.00 






173,410.00 


363,604.00 


>> 


260,000.00 


1,424,984.00 


5 yrs. 


130,000.00 


572,479.00 


5 yrs. 


135,799.00 


656,492.00 


Cont. 


411,968.00 


574,689.00 




56,000.00 


155,953.00 




92,000.00 


210,909.00 




93,000.00 


129,803.00 




360,000.00 


733,496.00 




88,450.00 


216,265.00 




664,657.00 


1,165,569.00 




24,000.00 


108,420.00 




j» 


73,000.00 


175,792.00 



54 REPORT 01^ REGENTS 

In 1907 the Legislature of Alabama appropriated $100,- 
000.00 annually for four years for the University of Alabama 
for improvements on buildings. 

In 1907 the Legislature of Minnesota appropriated $175,- 
000.00 annually for three years for the University of Minne- 
sota for cost of engineering buildings. In 1909 this tax was 
extended from three to five years. 

In 1905 the Legislature of Wisconsin continued for five 
years the annual appropriation of $200,000.00 to the Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin for buildings and equipment. In 1909 the 
period was extended from five to seven years. 

In 1907 the Legislature of Wisconsin appropriated $100,- 
000.00 annually for five years to the University of Wisconsin 
for the construction and equipment for a women's building. 

In 1909 the Legislature of Maine appropriated $100,000.00 
annually for four years to the University of Maine for all pur- 
poses, including maintenance and new buildings. 

The report of the secretary of the Virginia Education Com- 
mission summarizes the arguments in favor of the mill tax 
method of support as follows : 

"1. Sixteen of the most progressive states supporting 
twenty-one of the most prosperous institutions have adopted it 
and after having had an experience with it, pronounce it the 
best. 2. It enables the institutions or system thus supported 
to have a fixed policy which shall be in force for an indefinite 
period, and to make far-seeing and wiser plans for future 
growth and needs. No consistent educational policy can be 
carried out without some degree of dependence upon a certain 
income. The administrative officers must have some reason- 
able anticipation of the funds which can be commanded for 
use, if the} are to plan wisely and economically. Private in- 
stitutions liave an endowment and hence an assured income, 
which while not often sufficient, is always certain. The 
mill tax amounts to a permanent endowment with the 



01^ the: university 01^ IDAHO. 55 

State behind it. 3. It produces a constantly increas- 
ing revenue, while private endowments, desirable and 
helpful as they are, produce decreasing returns on ac- 
count of lower rates of interest. The revenue from 
a mill tax is certain to grow somewhat from year to year and 
to grow very considerably when long periods of time are taken 
into consideration. In Minnesota, for instance, it has doubled 
in the last ten years. Experience in other states has shown 
that the amount of revenue will increase with the increase in 
the wealth of the state and in proportion to the growth and 
needs of the school system. It does not always keep up with 
them, but nearly every state which has had a mill tax for any 
length of time has not only continued it, but has increased it, 
one or more times as the needs have demanded. A fixed ap- 
propriation continually becomes inadequate, and it is difficult 
to get it increased. 4. It gives stability to the business efforts 
of a school system, which could not be expected at all if it de- 
pended on an annual or biennial presentation of the needs to 
the legislature. 5. It provides a stable support in times of 
financial depression and eras of politicalism, and is, therefore, 
a more scientific and practical method of support. 6. It pre- 
vents constant and undignified lobbying throughout the session 
of the legislature, and avoids the unseemly biennial scrambles 
and unpleasant rivalry among the several state institutions 
before the legislative committees. 7. It saves much time and 
annoyance to the legislators themselves by relieving them of 
the importunities of a most persistent and numerous class of 
lobbyists and prevents 'log-rolling' and 'wire-pulling' among 
representatives of different parts of the state when one insti- 
tution is, as it usually is, played against another located in a 
different part of the state. These rivalries often lead to un- 
necessary duplication of work intended only to appeal for an 
appropriation. 8. It adds to the dignity and self-respect of 
the school men themselves by relieving them of the necessity 



56 REPORT OF REGENTS 

of engaging in this unwilling, unpleasant, but necessary, strug- 
gle for existence, which is an unwise use of the time, energy 
and ability of the president, trustees and friends of an institu- 
tion, and puts a premium on political leadership rather than 
educational leadership. The general progress in this country is 
toward academic freedom and the elimination of politics from 
education." 

Why not adopt the principle of permanent appropriations 
for educational institutions, which is so strongly enforced by 
considerations of public welfare and educational welfare. It 
is easier and better for Legislators and Regents to plan for a 
ten-year term. It is not difficult to foresee the needs of the 
University for the next ten years, and to make such provision 
for them as the finances of the State will permit. There are 
only a few departments of University activity the future of 
which cannot now be gauged with certainty. These are the 
Departments of University Extension in all its forms, includ- 
ing correspondence work, field work in agriculture, extension 
schools, demonstration farms, etc., and these should be con- 
tinued under the present system of biennial appropriations. The 
other needs of the University for maintenance and support, 
and for buildings and for permanent improvements, should be 
provided for, either by a permanent mill rate tax, or a definite 
appropriation fixed for a term of years. 

PUBLICATIONS BY MEMBERS OF THE FACULTY. 

Following is a list of the more important books, mono- 
graphs, contributions to scientific or other periodicals by mem- 
bers of the present University Faculty. The material is ar- 
ranged to show (1) the authors, (2) academic and honorary 
degrees, (3) present official university title, (4) titles of pub- 
lications in chronological order, (5) publisher or serial publica- 
tion, and (()) year. There are doubtless omissions in this list, 
which will be supplemented at some later time: 



OF THE UNIVERSITY OP IDAHO. 57 

ALDRICH, JOHN MERTON, B. S., M. S., Ph. D., Professor of Biology. 

(a) Revision of tlie Genera Dolichopus and Hygroceleuthus 
Kansas University Quarterly, 11, pp. 1 — 26,1 plate 1893 

(b) Dolichopodidae and Phoridae of St. Vincent, W. I. 
Transactions of the Entomological Society of London, 

part 3, pp. 309-345 and 435-439 1896 

(c) A Collection of Diptera from Indiana Caves. 21st 
Annual Report, Dept. of Geology of Indiana, 186-190 1897 

(d) (With TURLEY, L. A.) 
A Balloon-making Fly. 

American Naturalist, XXXIII, 809-812, figures 1899 

(e) Family Dolichopodidae in Biologia Centrali-Ameri- 
cana, Diptera. 

Vol. 3, Suppl., pp. 333-366, 1 plate 1901 

(f) Dolichopodidae of Grenada, W. I. 

Kansas Univ. Science Bulletin, 1, 75-94, 1 plate 1902 

(g) A Contribution to the Study of North America Dolich- 
opodidae. 

Transactions American Entomological, Society,XXX 

269-286 1904 

(h) A Catalogue of North American Diptera. 

Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections, No. 1444, pp. 

1-680 1905 

(i) The Dipterous Genus Calotarsa, with one New Species. 

Entomological News, XVII, 123-127, 1 plate 1906 

(With DARLINGTON, P. S.) 
(j) The Dipterous Family Helomyzidae. 

Transactions of the American Entomological Society, 

XXXIV, 67-100, 2 plates 1908 

(k) Meigen's First Paper on Diptera. 

Canadian Entomologist XL., 370-373 1908 

(1) The Family Dolichopodidae in Williston's "Manual of 

North American Diptera," pp. 228-235, 1 plate 1908 

(m) The Fruit-Infesting Forms of the Dipterous Genus 

Rhagoletis, with one New Species 1909 

(n) The Genus Copestylum. 

Entomological News, XXI, 222-225 1910 

AXTELL, HAROLD LUCIUS, A. B., A. M., Ph. D., Professor of 
Greek and Latin. 

(a) Roman Amusements and Entertainments. 

Kalamazoo College Index 1898 

(b) The Authenticity of the XlVth Heroid of Ovid. 

Privately printed 1900 

(c) The Deification of Abstract Ideas in Roman Literature 
and Inscriptions. 

The University of Chicago Press 1907 

CARLYLE, WILLIAM LEVI, B. S. A., M. S., Dean of Agriculture, 
and Director of Experiment Station. 

(a) Stalls and Ties for Dairy Cows. 

Minnesota Farmers' Institute Bulletin, pp. 69-75 1896 

(b) Milk Production in Minnesota. 

Minnesota Farmers' Institute Bulletin, pp. 53-58 1897 

(c) The Cheese Industry of Minnesota. 

Minnesota Farmers' Institute Bulletin, pp. 70-72 1897 

(d) Sketch of the Life of Theodore Louis. 

Minnesota Farmers' Institute Bulletin, pp. 131-134, 

2 plates . . . .' 1897 

(e) Farm Grains for Feeding Lambs. 



58 REPORT OF REGENTS 



15th Annual Report, Agricultural Experiment Station, 
University of Wisconsin, pp. 17-23 1898 

(f) Rape vs. Clover for Growing Pigs. 

15th Annual Report, Agricultural Experiment Station, 
University of Wisconsin, pp. 24-29 1898 

(g) Rape vs. Clover for Young Pigs. 

16th Annual Report, Agricultural Experiment Station, 
University of Wisconsin, pp. 25-30, 2 plates 1899 

(h) Comparative Feeding A^alue of Corn and Peas for Lambs. 
16th Annual Report, Agricultural Experiment Station, 
University of Wisconsin, pp. 44-51, 2 plates 1899 

(i) The Economy of Heavy Grain Feeding for Dairy Cows. 
16th Annual Report, Agricultural Experiment Station, 
University of Wisconsin, pp. 52-67, 13 plates 1899 

(j) Dairy Herd Records. 

16th Annual Report Agricultural Experiment Station, 
University of Wisconsin, pp. 68-88, 13 plates 1899 

(k) The Effect on Dairy Cows of Changing Milkers. 

16th Annual Report, Agricultural Experiment Station, 
University of Wisconsin, pp. 52-67, 1899 

(1) Protecting Cows from Flies. 

16th Annual Report, Agricultural Experiment Station, 
University of Wisconsin, pp. 92-96 1899 

(m) Feeding Pigs for the Production of Lean and Fat Meat. 
17th Annual Report, Agricultural Experiment Station, 
University of Wisconsin, pp. 12-24, 9 plates 1900 

(n) Feeding Value of Rape for Growing Pigs. 

17th Annual Report, Agricultural Experiment Station, 
University of Wisconsin, pp. 25-27 1900 

(o) The Comparative Feeding Value of Corn Fodder, Corn 
Silage, Roots, and Hay for Feeding Breeding Ewes in 
Winter. 

17th Annual Report, Agricultural Experiment Station, 
University of Wisconsin, pp. 28-36 1900 

(p) The Economy of Heavy Grain Feeding for Dairy Cows. 
17th Annual Report, Agricultural Experiment Station, 
University of Wisconsin, pp. 37-61 1900 

(q) The Comparative Value and the Effect Upon Lamb Crop • 
of Feeding Various Rations to Ewes in Winter. 
18th Annual Report, Agricultural Experiment Station, 
University of Wisconsin, pp. 16-24 1901 

(r) The Effect of Feeding Various Grain Rations to Grow- 
ing and Fattening Hogs. 

18th Annual Report, Agricultural Experiment Station, 
University of Wisconsin, pp. 25-44 1901 

(s) The Comparative Effect of Feeding Pigs Rations of Corn 
Meal and Ground Peas. 

18th Annual Report, Agricultural Experiment Station, 
University of Wisconsin, pp. 44-58, 8 plates 1901 

(t) The Feeding Value of Rape for Swine. 

18th Annual Report, Agricultural Experiment Station, 
University of Wisconsin, pp. 59-67 1901 

(u) The Value of Goats for Clearing Land in Wisconsin. 
Hand Book of Agriculture. 
Wisconsin l^\trmers' Institutes, pp. 191-195, 2 plates.... 1901 

(v) The Comparative Effect Upon the Development and 
Character of the Carcas of Pigs Fed Upon Rations of 
Ground Poas and Corn Meal. 
19th Annual Import, Agricultural Experiment Station, 



OF the: university of idaho. 59 

University of Wisconsin, pp. 17-33, 8 plates 1902 

(w) The Results of a Feeding Trial Comparing Razorback 
with a Cross Bred Razorback and Improved Breeds 
of Hogs. 

19th Annual Report, Agricultural Experiment Station, 
University of Wisconsin, pp. 33-41, 4 plates 1902 

(x) Some Observations on Sheep Breeding from the Ex- 
periment Station Flock Records. 

19th Annual Report, Agricultural Experiment Station, 
University of Wisconsin, pp. 42-61 1902 

(y) The Comparative Value and Effect Upon the Lambs of 
Feeding Various Grain Rations to Pregnant Ewes. 
19th Annual Report, Agricultural Experiment Station, 
University of Wisconsin, pp. 62-71 1902 

(z) Three Types of Market Sheep. 

19th Annual Report, Agricultural Experiment Station, 
University of Wisconsin, pp. 72-74 1902 

(aa) Studies in Milk Production. 

Bulletin No. 102, Agricultural Experiment Station. 
University of Wisconsin, pp. 88 1903 

(bb) Soiling Crops for Dairy Cows in Wisconsin. 

Bulletin No. 103, Agricultural Experiment Station, 
University of Wisconsin, pp. 14 1903 

(cc) The Food Requirements of Pigs from Birth to Maturity. 
Bulletin No. 104, Agricultural Experiment Station, 
University of Wisconsin, pp. 52 1903 

(dd) Feeding Steers on Sugar Beet Pulp, Alfalfa, Hay and 
Farm Grains. 

Bulletin No. 97, Colorado Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion, pp. 14 1905 

(ee) Feeding Steers on Sugar Beet Pulp, Alfalfa, Hay and 
Ground Corn. 

Bulletin No. 102, Colorado Agricultural Experiment 
Station, pp. 12 1905 

(ff) The Belgian Draft Horse. 

Cyclopedia of American Agriculture, Vol. 3, pp. 451- 

453, 1 plate 1908 

(&S) The French Draft Horse. 

Cyclopedia of American Agriculture, Vol. 3, pp. 460.- 

462, 1 plate 1908 

(hh) Ryeland Sheep. 

Cyclopedia of American Agriculture, Vol. 3, pp. 632- 

633, 1 plate 1908 

(ii) Feeding Experiments with Range Steers. 

Bulletin No. 149, Colorado Agricultural Experiment 
Station, pp. 16 1909 

(jj) Feeding Experiments with Lambs. 

Bulletin No. 151, Colorado Agricultural Experiment 
Station, pp. 8 1910 

(kk) Swine Production in Idaho. 

Idaho Experiment Station Bulletin. 
(In preparation). 

CHILDERS, LUCIUS FRANKLIN, B. S., M. S. A., Associate Professor 
(in charge) of Agronomy, and Agronomist of the Experiment 
Station. 

(a) Lime-Magnesia Ratio in Plants. 

(In Preparation.) 

(b) The Duty of Water. 

(In Preparation.) 



60 RDPORT OF REGENTS 

COGSWELL, ISAAC JACKSON, B. M., Professor of Music. 

(a) The Relation to Breath of Piano Playing. 

The Indicator , 1886 

(b) Breathing in Piano Playing. 

The Indicator 1887 

(c) A Lost Art. 

The Indicator 1887 

(d) American System of Notation for Vocal Music. 

(Privately Printed.) 

(e) Is Music a Language? 

The Indicator 1887 

(f) A Dream, Serial Storiette. 

Brainard's Musical World 1888 

(g) Time. 

The Indicator 1888 

(h) Modulators. 

The Indicator 1888 

(i) Musical Morals. 

Church's Musical Visitor 1888 

(j) The Hand. 

The Indicator 1889 

(k) The Future Composer. 

Visitor and Chicago Inter-Ocean 1889 

(1) Classical Music. 

The Indicator 1889 

(m) Public Sentiment and Musical Culture. 

Church's Musical Visitor 1889 

(n) Dissonants. 

Church's Musical Visitor 1889 

(o) The Slur. 

The Allegro, Carthage, Mo 1889 

(p) System of Fingering for the Scales. 

The Indicator 1890 

(q) Music of the Grand Canyon. 

Church's Musical Visitor 1890 

(r) Suggestions to Musical People. 

Church's Musical Visitor 1890 

(s) Organs. 

Church's Musical Visitor 1891 

(t) Classical Music. 

North-Western Musical Journal 1894 

(u) Music. 

North-Western Musical Journal 1894 

(v) A Manuel for Young Piano Teachers. 
(In Preparation.) 

DELURY, JUSTIN SARSFIELD, B. A., Assistant Professor of Geology 
and Mineralogy. 

(a) (With ALLEN, F. B.) 

A New Double; Oxalate of Bismuth and Potassium. 

Journal of the American Chemical Society 1903 

(b) Cobaltito, Occurring in Northern Ontario, Canada. 

The American Journal of Science 1906 

(c) The Area West of Bay Lake on the Montreal River. 

Report of the Ontario Bureau of Mines, Part II 1907 

DURFEE, EDGAR NOBLE, A. B., J. D., Associate Professor of Law. 
(a) Probate Law of Michigan. 
(In Preparation.) 

ELDRIDGE, JAY GLOVER, B. A., M. A., Ph. D., Professor of the 



OF THE UNIVERSITY 01^ IDAHO. 61 

German Language and Literature, and Dean of the University 
Faculty. 

(a) (With PALMER, A. H.) 

Edition of Schiller's Die Braut von Messina with intro. 

and notes. 

Henry Holt and Company 1901 

(b) A Study in the Infinitive After Modal Auxiliaries in the 
Middle High German Epic. 

(Doctor's Diss., Unpublished.) 1906 

ELLIOTT, EDWIN EBENEZER, M. A., Professor of Agricultural 
Education. 
Scientific and Agricultural. 

(a) Our Friends in Feathers. 

Series On Bird Life. Farm and Home 1898 

(b) Experiments in Feeding Swine. 

W. S. C. Experiment Station 1903 

(c) The Wheat Plant. 

The Cyclopedia of Agriculture, L. H. Bailey 1905 

(d) Dairying and Its Possibilities. 

The Pacific Monthly 1906 

(e) Steer Breeding Under Washington Conditions. 

W. S. C. Experiment Station Bulletin 1906 

(f) The Agricultural Possibilities of the Northwest. 

The Pacific Monthly 1907 

(g) Was Adam, the First, a Mutant? 

The Independent 1907 

(h) Growing Alfalfa in Washington Without Irrigation. 

W. S. C. Experiment Station Bulletin 1907 

(i) Hybrid Wheats. 

W. S. C. Experiment Station Bulletin 1908 

Educational and Economic, 
(j) The Cow; A Study for Common School Children. 

W. S. C. Bulletin 1903 

(k) Co-operation in Foreign Lands. 

Rural Spirit 1905 

(1) The Relation of Mental Attitudes to Physical Develop- 
ment 1905 

(m) History; Its Relation to Human Progress 1905 

(n) The Educational Value of the Study of Live Stock. 

Inland Farmer 1906 

(o) Co-operation in Agriculture. 

The Ranch 1906 

(p) The Making of a Man for a Mission. 

Inland Farmer 1907 

(q) A Suggested Scheme for County Agricultural Schools. 

Farmers' Union 1907 

(r) The Farmer's Mind. 

The Michigan Academy of Science. (Awaiting Pub.) 
Literary. 
(s) The Old Man and Tom. " 

Breeders' Gazette 1899 

(t) How the Hogs Paid the Mortgage. 

Breeders' Gazette 1900 

(u) Eloise Willard. 

The Oracle 1900 

(v) Las Palmas; A Legend. 

Breeders' Gazette 190? 

(w) The Hermits of the West. 

Breeders' Gazette 1903 



62 REPORT O^ REGENTS 

(x) On the Moors of Scotland. 

Rural Spirit 1905 

(y) The Shepherd and His Flock. 

Breeders' Gazette 1906 

(z) The Best Christmas Story. 

Rural Spirit 1906 

(aa) When the Cows Are Coniing Home. 

Breeders' Gazette 1907 

(bb) Breaking Home Ties. 

Breeders' Gazette 1908 

FRENCH, PERMEAL JANE, Dean of Women. 

(a) Course for Study for the Graded Schools of Idaho. 

Bulletin, the Office of State Superintendent of Edu- 
cation 1899 

FRANDSON, JULIUS HERMAN, B. S. A., M. S. A., Professor of 
Dairying, and Dairyman of Idaho Experiment Station. 

(a) Moisture in Corn. 

Iowa Experiment Station 1902 

(b) Value of Fruit as Food. 

Iowa Experiment Station 1904 

(c) Suggestions to the Dairy Farmer. 

Idaho Experiment Station, Press Bulletin No. 13 1908 

(d) Babcock Test for Butter-Fat. 

Idaho Experiment Station, Bulletin No. 63 1908 

(e) Better Dairy Methods. 

Idaho Experiment Station, Bulletin No. 67 1909 

(f) The Keeping Quality and Flavor of Butter as Affected 
by Various Degrees of Acidity and Amounts of Salt Used. 

(In Preparation.) 

(g) A Comparison of the Various Methods of Determining 
Moisture in Butter. 

(In Preparation.) 
(h) A Study of Butter with Special Reference to the 
Amount of Shrinkage That May Occur Under Ordinary 
Storage and Shipping Conditions. 
(In Preparation.) 
(i) A Comparison of Alfalfa Meal and Alfalfa for Milk Pro- 
duction. 

(In Preparation.) 

GURNEY, LAWRENCE EMERY, A. B., Ph. D., Professor of Physics. 

(a) The Viscosity of Water at Very Low Rates of Shear. 

The Physical Review 1908 

(b) Some Observations On the Surface Rigidity of Water. 

The Physical Review 1908 

(c) Effects of the Soluble Constituents of Glass on the 
Viscosity of Water at Very Low Rates of Shear 1908 

HANER, JENNIE, L. K., M. A., Director of Domestic Economy and 
Instructor in Drawing. 

(a) School Garment Cutter, with Instruction Book. 

Privately Printed 1902 

(b) Manual of Pattern Drafting. 

Whitcomb & Barrows, Boston 1909 

HULME, EDWARD MASLTN, B. A., M. A., Professor of History. 

(a) An Evening Thought. 

H. S. Crocker Co., San Francisco 1895 

(b) At Twilight. 

ir. S. Crocker Co., San Francisco 1897 



OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. 63 

(c) Rosamond Marriott Watson. 

The Seciuoia, 6:11&-17, Stanford University 1896-7 

(d) Where He Listeth. 

The Sequoia, 6: 281-84, Stanford University 1896-7 

(e) Rudyard Kipling-. 

The Seauoia, 6:308-309, Stanford University 1896-7 

(f) The Man With the Hoe. 

The Oregonian, Portland 1899 

(g) Chrysdoras. 

The Caduceus, 22, pp. 79-83 1898 

(h) An Adventurer Who Became a Pope. 

The Caduceus, 23, pp. 430-435 1909 

(i) When Bologna Taught the World. 

The Caduceus, 24, pp. 427-433 1910 

(j) The College, the Individual and the State. 

The Argonaut, Vol. 12, No. 14, pp. 1-5 1910 

IDDINGS, EDWARD JOHN, B. S., (Agr.), Principal of the School of 
Practical Agriculture. 

(a) Report of Field Commissioner. 

Report of Proceedings, Fourth Dry Farming Congress, 
Billings, Mont 1909 

(b) Raising Sheep in Southern Idaho. 

Orange Judd Farmer, Chicago, 111 1909 

(c) Dry Farming Congress Bulletin. (Edited.) 

June and July 1910 

(d) Conservation on the Western Prairies. 

Pacific Monthly 1910 

(e) Educating Toward the Farm. 

Report of Proceedings of the Fifth Dry Farming Con- 
gress, Spokane, Wash 1910 

Also articles in the following agricultural papers: 

Pacific Northwest Commerce, Seattle, Wash. 

Colorado Dairyman, Denver, Colo. 

Trans-Missouri Farmer and Ranchman, Cheyenne, Wyo. 

American Sheep-Breeder, Chicago, 111. 

The Alberta Homestead, Edmonton, Alberta, Can. 

Bulman's Farm Motor Magazine, Winnepeg, Can. 

Farm and Home, Springfield, Mass. 

JONES, J. SHIRLEY, B. S., Professor of Agricultural Chemistry, and 
Chemist of the Idaho Experiment Station. 

(a) The Manufacture of Giant Powder. 

The California Technologist 1905 

(b) Conditions Affecting the Production of De-Natured 
Alcohol in the Northwest. 

Idaho Experiment Station Bulletin No. 60 1907 

(c) Soils Considered from a Chemical Standpoint. 

Gem State Rural 1908 

(d) Alaska Wheat Investigation. 

Idaho Experiment Station Bulletin No. 65 1908 

(e) Chemical and Mechanical Analysis of Characteristic 
Idaho Soils. 

Idaho Experiment Station Bulletin No. 68 1910 

(f) Composition of Irrigated and Non-Irrigated Fruits. 

(In Preparation.) 

(g) Milling Properties of Idaho Wheat. 

(In Preparation.) 

LITTLE, CHARLES NEWTON, A. B., A. M., Ph. D., Professor of Civil 
Engineering. 



64 REPORT O^ REGENTS 

(a) On Knots, with a Census for Order Ten. 

Trans. Connecticut Academy, Vol. VII 1885 

(b) (With MOORE, E. H., Jr.) 
Note on Space Divisions. 

American Journal of Mathematics 1885 

(c) Non-Alternate Knots of Orders Eight and Nine. 

Trans. Royal Society of Edinburgh, Vol. XXXV 1889 

(d) Alternate Knots, Order Eleven. 

Trans. Royal Society of Edinburgh, Vol. XXXVI 1890 

(e) Note on a Geometrical Theorem. 

American Journal of Mathematics 1893 

(f) Non-Alternate Knots, Order Ten. 

Trans. Royal Society of Edinburgh, Vol. XXXIX 1899 

(g) (With ZEIGLER, W. L.) 

Trap Rocks of the Palouse Region as Road Material. 
University of Idaho, Civil Engineering Dept. Bulletin 

No. 1, pp. 12, 3 plates 1904 

(h) (With TURLEY, W. G.) 

Trap Rocks of Palouse Region as Road Material; 
Progress Report. 

University of Idaho, Civil Engineering Department, 
Bulletin No. 2, pp. 15, 1 plate 1905 

MacLANE, JOHN FISHER, B. A., LL. B., Professor of Law. 

(a) Revised Codes of Idaho. 

Syms-York Co.. 1908 

(b) Law's Delays. 

Bench and Bar Review 1909 

McCAFFERY, RICHARD STANISLAUS, E. M., Professor of Mining 
and Metallurgy. 
(a) (With YOUNG, MORRISON B.) 

The Geology of the San Pedro District, New Mexico. 
Transactions American Inst. Mining Engineers, New 
York, Vol. XXXIII 1903 

MOORE, HENRIETTA EVANGELINE, M. L., M. A., Ph. D. 

(a) Literary Criticism of the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Cen- 
turies. 

M. L. Thesis, University of California 1896 

(b) Petrarchan Influence Upon English Poets of the Ren- 
aissance. 

M. A. Thesis, Columbia University 1902 

(c) Greek Sources of the Anglo-Saxon Poem Andreas. 
Columbia University 1903 

(d) The Language We Speak; Its Elements and Growth. 
Portland Oregonian 1900 

(e) Literary Activity of New York from the Earliest Times 
to the Death of Cooper. 

Doctor's Dissertation. Columbia University. 
(In Press.) 

NICHOLSON, JOHN FREDERICK, B. S., M. S., Associate Professor 
(in charge) of Bacteriology, and Bacteriologist of the Idaho Ex- 
periment Station. 

(a) (With HARDING, H. A.) 

A Swelling of Canned Peas Accompanied by a Malodor- 
ous Decomposition. 
N. Y. Experiment Station, Bulletin No. 249 1903 

(b) (With LEWIS, L. L.) 
Disinfecting Power of Coal-tar Dips. 



OF THK UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. • 65 

Oklahoma Experiment Station Bulletin No. 62 1904 

(c) (With LEWIS, L. L.) 
The Water Supply. 

Oklahoma Experiment Station Bulletin No. 66 1904 

(d) Diseases of Small Fruits. 

Oklahoma Experiment Station Bulletin No. 69 1905 

(e) (With MORRIS, O. H.) 
Orchard Spraying. 

Oklahoma Experiment Station Bulletin No. 76 1908 

(f) San Jose Scale in Oklahoma. 

Oklahoma Experiment Station Bulletin No. 79 1908 

(g-) Bacteria in Their Relation to the Keeping Quality of 
Butter. 

(In Preparation.) 

OSBORNE, OLIVER MARTIN, B. S. A., Agronomist. 

(a) Co-operative Fruit Marketing. 

Wisconsin State Horticultural Society Report 1909 

RICE, CARL COSMO, A. B., A. M., Ph. D., Associate Professor (in 

charge) of Romance Languages. 

(a) Etymological Notes on Old Spanish Consograr, Con- 
sagrar, Consangrar. 

Modern Language Notes, Vol. XVI., No. 8, pp. 471 ff 1901 

(b) The Etymology of Italian Greggio, Grezzo. 

Modern Philology, Vol. 1, No. 2, pp. 337 ff 1903 

(c) The Etymology of the Romance Words for "To Go." 
Publications of the Modern Language Association of 
America, Vol. XIX., No. 2, pp. 217 ff 1904 

(d) Romance Etymologies. 

Publications of the Modern Language Association of 
America, Vol. XX., No. 2, pp. 339 ff 1905 

(e) The Pronunciation of Gallic Clerical Latin in the 
Merovingian and Later Periods. 

Proceedings of the American Philological Association 1903 

(f) The Phonology of Gallic Clerical Latin After the Sixth 
Century. 

Harvard Diss., 1902. Privately Published 1909 

(g) Romance Etymologies. 

(In Preparation.) 

SHATTUCK, CHARLES HOUSTON, B. S., M. S., Ph. D., Professor 
of Forestry. 

(a) A Fossil Forest in Jackson County, Kansas. 
Proceedings of Kansas Academy of Science 1905 

(b) A Morphological Study of Ulnus Americana. 

Botanical Gazette 1905 

(c) A Study of the Morphology and Classification of Wood 
Fragments, found in the "Kansas" Glacial Drift. 
Kansas Academy of Science 1907 

(d) The Effect of Wounds on Root Tips of Phosealus and 

Vicia faba 1908 

(e) The Origin of Heterofpory in Musilia. 

Botanical Gazette 191Q 

(f) Forestral and Floral Survey of the Clearwater National 
Forest. 

(In Preparation.) 

SAGE, EVAN TAYLOR, A. B., A. M., Ph. D., Instructor in Latin and 
Greek. 

(a) The Quotations of Athenagoras and the Text of Euri- 
pides. 



66 REPORT OF REGENTS 

Classical Philology 1900 

(b) The Funeral Orations of Ambrosius. 
Master's Diss, (unpublished.) 

(c) The Pseudo-Ciceronian Consolatio. 

University of Chicago Press 1910 

STEIXMAN, DAVID BERNARD, B. S., A. M., C. E., Instructor in (^ivil 

Enginoerin;?. (With RAY, DAVID H.) 

(a) Notes On Surveying. 

College of City of New York 1909 

(b) Theory of Arches and Suspension Bridges. 
Myron C. Clark Publishing Co., Chicago. 

(In Press.) 

(c) Masonry and Reinforced Concrete Arches. 
Myron C. Clark Publishing Co., Chicago. 

(In Press.) 

(d) Suspension Bridges and Cantilevers. 

(In Preparation.) 

VINCENT, CLARENCE CORNELIUS, B. S., M. S. A., Assistant in 
Horticulture, and Assistant Horticulturist of the Experiment 
Station. 

(a) A Monographic Study of Juglans regia. 
(In Preparation.) 

von ENDE, CARL LEOPOLD, B. S., M. S., Ph. D., Professor of Chem- 
istry. 

(a) (With ANDREWS, L. W.) 

Eine Studie d. physikischen Eigenschaften von 

Lithiumschlorid Loesungen in Amylalkohol. 

Zietschrift f. Physik Chemie, Vol. 17, 141 1895 

(b) Ueber das Verhalten d. Bleisalze in Loesungen. 

Zeitschrift f. Anorg. Chemie, Vol. 26, 129 1901 

(c) Translation of Dolezalek's Theory of the Lead Accumu- 
lator. 

John Wiley & Sons, New York 1904 

(d) Translation of Abegg's Electrolytic Dissociation Theory. 

John Wiley & Sons, New York 1907 

(e) (With GUTHE, K. E.) 
Standard Cells. 

Physical Review, Vol. 24, 214 1907 

(f) (With LEWIS, G. N.) 

The Potential of the Thallium Electrode. 

Journal of the American Chem. Soc, Vol. 32, p. 732.... 1910 

WICKS, WILLIAM HALE, B. S. A. M., M. S.. Associate Professor (in 
Charge) of Horticulture, and Horticulturist of the Experirr'eni StaMon. 

(a) Orchard Management. 

Oregon Experiment Station, Bulletin No. 93. 

(b) The Box as a Factor in Securing Uniformity of Our 

Apple Pack. Western New York Apple 1908 

(c) A Score Card for Nursery Stock. 

Oregon Countryman 1908 

(d) Pruning the Young Apple Tree. 

Cornell Countryman 1910 

(e) A Product of Organization. 

Idaho Student Fanner 1909 

(f) 'I'he Farmer's Vegetable Garden. 

Idaho Experiment Station, Bulletin No. 69 1910 



OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. dl 

FINANCIAL EXHIBITS. 

The following- exhibits of receipts and disbursements repre- 
sent the main divisions of the University's funds for 1909-10 : 

1. The U. S. Government Morrill Fund. 

2. The U. S. Government Hatch Fund. 

3. The U. S. Government Adams Fund. 

4. The Local Station Fund. 

5. Funds appropriated to University maintenance, includ- 
ing the general appropriations and interest funds. 

6. Minor funds appropriated to a specific service by the 
Legislature of 1909. 

7. All other funds. 

When the appropriation is for a general, and not for a 
specific service, the expenditures are analyzed and classified 
under six heads for the Morrill Fund, eighteen heads for the 
Hatch, Adams and Local Station Funds, and twelve heads tor 
the State Maintenance Funds. When the appropriation is for 
a specific service the summary shows amount available, total 
disbursements, and balance on hand. The Financial Appendix 
contains a list of all State warrants, names of claimants, na- 
ture of service and amount paid. 

U. S. MORRILL FUND. 

(July 1, 1908,— June 30, 1909.) 

Receipts. 

Balance on hand July 1, 1908 $ 1,236.14 

To Morrill installment for 1908-9 35,000.00 



Total available for year ending June 30, 1909 ..$ 36,236.14 

Disbursements. 
(As per abstract of report to U. S. Governmov.* v 

By Agriculture $ 4,612.05 

By Mechanic Arts 10,856.62 

By English Language 3,970.00 

By Mathematical Science 2,770.00 

By Natural or Physical Science 10,063.15 

By Economic Science 3,900.40 



Total expended during year $ 36,172.22 

Balance remaining unexpended July 1, 1909, (with accounts 

to cover 63.92 

Total $ 36,236.14 



t 



68 REPORT OE REGENTS 

U. S. MORRILL FUND. 

(July 1, 1909,— June 30, 1910.) 

Receipts. 

Balance on hand July 1, 1909 $ 63.92 

To Morrill installment for 1909-10 40,000.00 

Total available for the year ending June 30, 1910 $ 40,063.92 

Disbursements. 

(As per abstract of report to U. S. Government.) 

By Agriculture $ 9,071.86 

By Mechanic Arts 10,035.57 

By English Language 4,150.00 

By Mathematical Science 2,800.00 

By Natural or Physical Science 9,856.49 

By Economic Science 4,150.00 



Total expended during year $ 40,063.92 



U. S. HATCH FUND. 

(July 1, 1908— June 30, 1909.) 

Receipts. 

To Hatch installment for 1908-9 $ 15,000.00 

Disbursements. 

(As per abstract of report to U. S. Government.) 

By Salaries $ 5,688.55 

By Labor 3,001.41 

By Publications 1,004.25 

By Postage and Stationery 263.06 

By Freight and Express 396.33 

By Heat, Light, Water and Power 854.19 

By Chemical Supplies 158.56 

By Seeds, Plants and Sundry Supplies 660.17 

By Fertilizers 17.32 

By Feeding Stuffs 265.48 

By Library 125.58 

By Tools, Implements and Machinery 1,277.24 

By Furniture and T^^ixtures 171.70 

By Scientific Apparatus 101.45 

By Live Stock 64.05 

By Traveling Expenses 572.70 

By Contingent Expenses 15.00 

By Buildings and Land 362.96 

Total .$ 15,000.00 



01^ THK UNIVE:RSITY OF IDAHO. 69 

U.S. HATCH FUND. 

(July 1, 1909— June 30, 1910.) 

Receipts. 

To Hatch installment for 1909-10 $15,000.00 

Disbursements. 

(As per abstract of report to U. S. Government.) 

By Salaries $ 8,018.98 

By Labor 3,623.19 

By Publications 33.15 

By Postage and Stationery 172.61 

By Freight and Express 82.39 

By Heat, Light, Water and Power 673.88 

By Chemical Supplies 66.15 

By Seeds, Plants and Sundry Supplies 278.73 

By Feeding Stuffs 553.83 

By Library 23.53 

By Tools, Implements and Machinery 585.74 

By Furniture and Fixtures 13.73 

By Scientific Apparatus 37.58 

By Live Stock 12.50 

By Traveling Expenses 261.86 

By Contingent Expenses 15,00 

By Buildings and Land 547.63 



Total $ 15,000.00 



U. S. ADAMS FUND. 

(July 1, 1908— June 30, 1909.) 

Receipts. 

Balance on hand June 30, 1908 $ 1,064.11 

To Adams installment for 1908-9 9,955.89 

Total available for year ending June 30, 1909 $ 11,000.00 

Disbursements. 

(As per abstract of report to U. S. Government.) 

By Salaries $ 5,464.75 

By Labor 2,230.42 

By Postage and Stationery 140.90 

By Freight and Express 134.54 

By Heat, Light, Water and Power 101.73 

By Chemical Supplies 336.37 

By Seeds, Plants and Sundry Supplies 1,009.92 

By Fertilizers 15.00 

By Library 60.12 

By Tools, Implements and Machinery 458.20 

By Traveling Expenses 498.05 

By Buildings and Land 550.00 



Total $ 11,000.00 



70 REPORT OF REGENTS 

U. S. ADAMS FUND. 

(July 1, 1909— June 30, 1910.) 

Receipts. 

To Adams installment for 1909-10 $ 13,000.00 

Disbursements. 

(As per abstract of report to U. S. Government.) 

By Salaries .$ 6,487.25 

By Labor 2,427.35 

By Postage and Stationery 122.09 

By Freight and Express 231.28 

By Heat, Light, Water and Power 219.41 

By Chemical Supplies 219.47 

By Seeds, Plants and Sundry Supplies 596.07 

By Library 55.00 

By Tools, Implements and Machinery 216.64 

By Furniture and Fixtures 357.50 

By Scientific Apparatus 1,089.04 

By Traveling Expenses 328.90 

By Buildings and Land 650.00 



Total .$ 13,000.000 



LOCAL STA TION FUND. 

(July 1, 1908— June 30,1909.) 

Receipts. 

To Receipts from Farm Products $ 2,052.17 

Overdraft, July 1, 1908 61.82 



Total $ 1,990.35 

Disbursements. 

(As per abstract of report to U. S. Government.) 

By Labor $ 174.10 

By Postage and Stationery 16.00 

By Freight and Express 30.79 

By Heat, Light, Water and Power 113.27 

By Seeds, Plants and Sundry Supplies 647.02 

By Fr-eding Stuffs 7.77 

By Tools, Implements and Machinery 164.45 

By Live Stock 450.95 

By Travelin ;■ Expenses ." 32.25 

By I>and R' ntai 71.00 

By I buildings and I^and 25.65 

By Bal;irH-r- 257.10 

Total $ 1,990.35 



OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. 71 

LOCAL STATION FUND. 

(July 1, 1909— June 30, 1910.) 

Receipts. 

Balance on Hand July 1, 1909 $ 257.10 

To Receipts from Farm Products 4,098.07 



Total $ 4,855.17 

Overdraft 259.16 



$ 4,614.33 
Disbursements. 

(As per abstract of report to U. S. Government.) 

By Salaries $ 23.48 

By Labor 1,097.51 

By Publications 125.48 

By Postage and Stationery 307.66 

By Freight and Express 187.74 

By Heat, Light, Water and Power 276.03 

By Chemical Supplies 128.52 

By Seeds, Plants and Sundry Supplies 599.36 

By Feeding Stuffs 733.12 

By Library 13.91 

By Tools, Implements and Machinery 375. 9i! 

By Scientific Apparatus 25.94 

By Live Stock 126.90 

By Traveling Expenses 86.65 

By Advertising 4.05 

By Buildings and Land 502.06 

By Overdraft July 1, 1910 259.16 



Total $ 4,614.33 



72 REPORT OF REGENTS 

SUMMARY OF STATE MAINTENANCE, 
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE, UNIVERSITY AND AGRICUL- 
TURAL COLLEGE FUNDS. 

(January 1, 1909 — December 30, 1910.) 

Receipts. 

To Legislative Appropriation (State Maintenance) $ 46,000.00 

To School of Science Fund 20,134.15 

To University Fund 33,225.47 

To Agricultural Fund 26,597.87 

$125,957.49 
Disbursements. 

By Salaries for Instruction $ 42,953.60 

By Salaries for Administration 11,779.65 

By Salaries for Labor and Operation of Plant 13,440.33 

By Departmental Supplies 5,958.50 

By Departmental Apparatus, Machinery, Tools, Equipment 

and Live Stock 14,678.62 

By FYeight, Express, Postage, Telephone, Telegraph and 

Draying 3,998.41 

By Heat, Light, Water and Power 13,534.49 

By Printing and Office Supplies 3,652.81 

By Traveling Expenses 2,074.57 

By Insurance 2,380.33 

By Building and Grounds 9,216.89 

By Miscellaneous 2,289.29 

$125,957.49 



OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. 



73 



SUMMARY OF MINOR FUNDS, 1909. 

(Appropriated to Specific Uses.) 

Disbursements Unexpended 

as per appendix balance 

Regent Expense $1198.76 $ 301.24 

Furniture and Fixtures for Library. . 3453.00 47.00 

Furniture for Administration Bldg. . . 3577.33 922.67 

♦Purchase Books Library 1730.71 3269.29 

Maintenance Law School 4592.69 407.31 

Purchase Books Law School Library 2000.00 (Closed) 

Laboratory Equipment 1848.91 151.09 

Purchase & Installat'n Mining- Mach 3819.23 180.77 

Farmers' Institute and Agri. Ext'n. . 3999.97 .03 

Aux. Agr, Station 7997.26 2.74 

Purchase of a Typical Herd 2000.00 (Closed) 

Ex. of Cadet Corps — Seattle 2000.00 (Closed) 



Approp'n 

$1500.00 
3500.00 
4500.00 
5000.00 
5000.00 
2000.00 
2000.00 
4000.00 
4000.00 
8000.00 
2000.00 
2000.00 



*NOTE — Accounts contracted and bills rendered to cover the above 
unexpended balance. 



SUMMARY OF OTHER FUNDS. 

(Available for Specific Uses.) 

Am't Av'l'ble Disb'mts as per Unexpn'd 
Jan. 1, 1909, to Fin'c'l App'ndix. Dec. 30. 
Dec. 30, 1910. 1910. 
U. of I. Improvement Fund, 1905.$ 494.07 $ 494.07 None 
U. of I. Rebuilding and Equip- 
ment Fund, 1907. (Re-Bldg.) 74,404.44 74,404.44 None 
U. of I. Rebuilding and Equipment 

Fund, 1907. (Grading) 259.46 259.46 None 

Purchase Books for Library, 1907 5,487.60 5,487.60 None ' 

Mounting Specimens 473.68 None 473.68 

Aux. Agri. Station, Caldwell 2,200.13 2,200.13 None 

U. of L Insurance Fund 35,419.35 34,156.82 1,262.53 

U. of L Improvement Fund, 1909 52,000.00 35,775.61 16,224.39 

Local Maintenance Fund 6,160.73 5,180.19 980.54 

Law School Fund 1,072.75 759.67 313.08 

College Farm Fund 63.60 2.50 61.10 

College Live Stock Fund 615.82 231.30 384.52 



Extract From Warrant Register 

and 

Financial Appendix 



No. 

1251. 
1252. 
1253: 
1254. 
1255. 
1256. 
1257. 
1258. 
1259. 
1260. 
1261. 
1262. 
1263. 
1264. 
1265. 
1266. 
1267. 
1268. 
1269. 
1270. 
1271. 
1272. 
1273. 
1274. 
1340. 
1341. 
1342. 
1343. 
1344. 
1345. 



1346. 
1347. 
1585. 



1586. 
1587. 
1588. 
1589. 
1590. 
1591. 
1592. 
1593. 
1594. 
1595. 
1596. 
1597. 
1598. 
1599. 
1600. 
1601. 

160j:. 

1603. 



APPENDIX 

STATE WARRANTS— STATE MAINTENANCE FUND 

Name and Service. Amount. 

Belle Sweet, Nov. salary $ 83.35 

A. P. Vaughn, Dec. salary 100.00 

S. R. Sheldon, traveling expenses 33.05 

I. J. Cogswell, Jan. salary 100.00 

John Almquist, Nov. salary 60.00 

H. L. Axtell, Nov. salary 137.50 

Evan T. Sage, Nov. salarj'- 91.65 

Francis Jenkins, Jan. salary 95.65 

Ella Wood, Jan. salary 25.00 

Carl Grissen, Dec. salary 45.00 

John R. Middleton, Jan. salary 66.65 

Etta McGuire, Jan. salary 15.00 

May Caldwell, Jan. salary 30.00 

A. W. Smith, Jan. salary 75.00 

H. C. Oasved, Nov. salary 83.35 

Permeal French, Dec. salary 100.00 

J. G. Eldridge, Jan. salary 166.65 

W. A. Simpson, Dec. salary 60.00 

Gertrude Stephenson, Nov. salary 12.50 

Edward M. Hulme, Dec. salary 150.00 

Eber D. Kanaga, Jan. salary 125.00 

Sadie Stockton, Dec. salary 25.00 

W. A. Zumhoff, Jan. salary 83.35 

Nellie A. Regan, Nov. salary 66.65 

J. J. Sterner, supplies, publicity 14.35 

John W. Graham Co., furniture. Military 6.75 

Student Farmer, extra copies 15.00 

C. M. Fassett, apparatus, Mining 7.99 

Lewis P. Shanks, Nov. salary 125.00 

Forney & Moore, legal services, (four contracts $60.00), 
(Crane Co., settlement .$25.00), (Mitchell vs. Regents 
$100.00), (Moscow Hardware vs. Colson garnishment 

$100.00. (Expenses $10.00.) 295.00 

A. C. Terrill, traveling expenses 18.60 

J. G. Eldridge, traveling expenses 5.25 

The Bankers' Surety Co., bond on U. S. ordnance, 

military 10.00 

Gertrude Stephenson, Feb. salary 24.20 

W. A. Simpson, Nov. salary 60.00 

J. G. Eldridge, Dec. salary 166.65 

H. C. Oasved, Dec. salary 83.35 

W. A. Zumhoff, Dec. salary 83.35 

Evan T. Sage, Dec. salary. 91.65 

Sadie Stockton, Jan. salary 25.00 

John Almquist, Dec. salary 60.00 

A. P. Vaughn, Nov. salary 100.00 

H. L. Axtell, Dec. salary 137.50 

Etta McGuire, Dec. salary 15.00 

Elizabeth Stout, .Tun. 13 to Feb. 13, salary 70.00 

May Caldwell, Dec. salary 30.00 

Permeal French, Nov. salary 100.00 

J. R. Middleton, Dec. salary 66,65 

Nellie A. Regan, Dec. salary 66.65 

A. W. Smith, Dec. salary 75.00 

Belle Sweet, Dec. salary 83.35 



APPENDIX. 



Ill 



No. Name and Service. Amount. 

1604. I. J. Cogswell, Dec. salary 100.00 

1605. E. M. Hulme, Nov. salary 150.00 

1606. Carl Grissen, Nov. salary 45.00 

1607. Francis Jenkins, Dec. salary 95.65 

1608. Ella Woods, Dec. salary 25.00 

1609. E. D. Kanaga, Dec. salary 125.00 

1610. James A. MacLean, Feb. salary 366.65 

1611. E. H. Carey, Nov. salary .' 50.00 

1612. E. H. Carey, Oct. salary 50.00 

1613. Wash. L. & P. Co., light and power 111.20 

1614. Brandow Printing Co., class records 3.00 

1615. General Electric Co., equipment, Mining 15.00 

1616. Idaho Post, printing 8.00 

1617. City of Moscow, water 58.30 

1618. The Grote-Rankin Co., equipment, Domestic Science. . . . 65.45 

1619. Spokane Brush Co., supplies, janitor 6.00 

1620. General Electric Co., supplies 1.13 

1621. General Electric Co., supplies 18.44 

1622. Merritt & Co., supplies, janitor 9.85 

1623. The Statesman Printing Co., printing Regents' report. . . . 174.70 

1624. Minneapolis Furniture Co., furniture 141.20 

1625. C. M. Fassett, supplies, Chemistry 18.95 

1626. Imer & Amend, apparatus. Geology 66.00 

1627. Moscow Hardware Co., departmental equipment 29.63 

1628. General Electric Co., equipment. Mining 22.35 

1629. Seneca Falls Manfg. Co., apparatus, Mech. Eng 13.00 

1630. E. H. Sargent & Co., supplies. Chemistry 75.85 

1631. L. A. Torson, supplies, Biology 5.90 

1632. James G. Biddle, apparatus, Chemistry 5.42 

1633. Central Laboratory Supply Co., apparatus, Elec. Eng.... 70.25 

1634. Orr & Lockett, Hardware Co., supplies, Mech. Eng.... 61.26 

1635. Driver Harris Wire Co., supplies, Chemistry .89 

1636. Eagle Lock Co., equipment, Dairy and Chemistry 27.17 

1637. Pacific State Tel. & Tel. Co., telephone rental 7.50 

1638. J. C. Flannagan, painting 27.65 

1639. E. E. Elliott, traveling expenses 78.80 

1640. C. N. Little, traveling expenses 17.80 

1643. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for labor 159.55 

1645. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for janitor labor.... 155.70 

1646. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for freight and express 73.99 

2425. C. W. Colver, March salary 25.00 

2426. W. A. Simpson, March salary 60.00 

2427. James A. MacLean, March salary 366.65 

2428. H. L. Axtell, March salary 137.50 

2429. E. D. Kanaga, March salary 125.00 

2430. Sadie Stockton, March salary 25.00 

2431. May Caldwell, March salary 30.00 

2432. C. S. Edmundson, Feb. and March salary 50.00 

2433. H. C. Aosved, March salary 83.35 

2434. Gertrude Stephenson, March salary 33.60 

2435. Evan T. Sage, March salary 91.65 

2436. E. M. Hulme, March salary 150.00 

2437. W. A. Zumhoff, March salary 83.35 

2438. Carl Grissen, March salary 45.00 

2439. L. P. Shanks, March salary 125.00 

2440. L. P. Shanks, Feb. salary 125.00 

2441. Henry Smith, Feb. and March salary 50.00 

2442. Nellie Regan, March salary 66.65 



IV 



APPENDIX. 



No. Name and Service. Amount. 

2443. Francis Jenkins, March salary 95.65 

2444. J. R. Middleton, March salary 66.65 

2445. John Almquist, March salary 60.00 

2446. J. G. Eldridge, March salary 166.65 

2447. Etta McGuire, March salary 15.00 

2448. Belle Sweet, March salary 83.35 

2449. Permeal French, March salary 100.00 

2450. A. P. Vaug-hn, March salary 100.00 

2451. The Irwin Hodson Co., seal 20.00 

2452. A. E. Smith, March salary 75.00 

2453. I. J. Cogswell, March salary 100.00 

2454. Elizabeth Stout, salary Feb. 13 to March 13 70.00 

2455. D. C. Petrie, Jan. salary 15.00 

2456. Riehle Bros., apparatus, Civil Eng 125.00 

2457. Troy Lumber Co., equipment, Military 24.75 

2458. Moscow Commission Co., oats 9.00 

2459. C. M. Fassett, supplies, Mining 4.00 

2460. William Goodbody, envelopes 23.00 

2461. Union Iron Works, supplies, Mech. Eng 4.52 

2462. Madison Lumber Co., lumber 98.80 

2463. E. H. Sargent & Co., supplies. Chemistry 5.07 

2464. Geo. Creighton, departmental supplies 12.26 

2465. Standard Oil Co., supplies, Chemistry 66.30 

2466. Yoran Printing House, printing 3.00 

2467. Foote Mineral Co., supplies, Chemistry .84 

2468. Foote Mineral Co., specimens, Geology. 61.87 

2469. Collins & Orland, departmental supplies 34.45 

2470. R. Hodgins, supplies, janitor 44.70 

2471. Potlatch Lumber Co., lumber 55.90 

2472. E. H. Sargent & Co., supplies. Chemistry 1.21 

2473. Moscow Hardware Co., equipment 17.20 

2474. Western Electric Co., equipment, Chemistry 2.54 

2475. Empire Hardware Co., supplies 34.25 

2476. Ward Leonard Electric Co., apparatus, Elec. Eng 52.00 

2477. A. L. Vroman, plumbing 16.37 

2478. Standard Dray Co., cartage 7.75 

2479. Idaho- Wash., L. & P. Co., light and power 117.60 

2480. G. Hallam, carpenter work 8.00 

2481. John Hansen, labor 51.00 

2482. H. Staples, carpenter work 8.00 

2483. O. A. Benedict, carpenter work 56.50 

2484. Moscow Steam Laundry, laundry .65 

2485. Moscow Steam Laundry, laundry. Domestic Science. . 18.80 

2486. G. Hallam, carpenter work 35.00 

2487. The Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co., telephone rental 7.50 

2488. Moscow & Rural Tel. Co., rental and telephone 9.55 

2489. F. Rader, carpenter work 22.25 

2490. H. Staples, carpenter work 35.75 

2491. Chas. Witherspoon, insurance U. S. ordnance 15.52 

2492. Francis Jenkins, casli advanced for dept. labor 50.80 

249:;. l<Yancis Jenkins, cash advanced for freight and express 

and postage 143.98 

2494. A. P. Vaughn, supplies. Publicity 16.96 

249.'>. [-Yanris Jenkins, cash advanced for janitor labor.... 177.80 

2504. liutterficld, Elder Imp. Co., surrey 132.65 

2505. Orr & Lockett Hardware Co., equipment, Chemistry.... 2.25 

2858. Lewis P. Shanks, April salary 125.00 

2859. Nellie Regan, April salary 66.65 



APPENDIX. 



No. Name and Service. Amount. 

2860. A. P. Vaughn. April salary 100.00 

2861. I. J. Cogswell, April salary 100.00 

2862. J. G. Eldridge, April salary 166.65 

2863. Evan T. Sage, April salary 91. 6d 

2864. E. D. Kanaga, April salary 125.0ft 

2865. Etta McGuire, April salary , 1.^.00 

2866. W. A. Simpson, April salary ' 60.00 

2867. E. M. Hulme, April salary 150.00 

2868. Permeal French, April salary 100.00 

2869. John Almquist, April salary 60.00 

2870. E. J. Carey, April salary 50.00 

2871. James A. MacLean, April salary 166.65 

2872. Carl Grissen, April salary 45.00 

2873. Belle Sweet, April salary 83.35 

2874. H. C. Oasved, April salary 83.35 

2875. C. W. Colver, April salary 25.00 

2876. W. A. Zumhoff, April salary 83.35 

2877. Sadie Stockton, April salary 25.00 

2878. Henry Smith, April salary 25.00 

2879. A. W. Smith, April salary 75.00 

2880. H. L. Axtell, April salary 137.50 

2881. Clarence Edmundson, April salary 25.00 

2882. Francis Jenkins, April salary 95.65 

2883. J. R. Middleton, April salary 66.65 

2884. E. J. Carey, March salary 50.00 

2885. Elizabeth Stout, salary March 13 to April 13 70.00 

2886. L. W. Jordan, April salary 22.50 

2887. Gertrude Stephenson, March salary 25.50 

2888. City of Moscow, water 29.20 

2889. The Student Farmer, Adv 17.50 

2890. A. L. Vroman, plumbing 78.50 

'2891. J. H. Kirkwood, surveyor, services 24.80 

2892. Francis Jenkins, advanced for janitor labor 171.00 

2893. E. E. Elliott, traveling expenses 74.65 

2894. W. R. Chedsey, traveling expenses 6.50 

2895. J. G. Eldridge, traveling expenses 19.65 

2896. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for freight, express, 
postage, telegrams 95.20 

2897. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for labor 184.75 

2898. The Idaho Post, printing 10.00 

2899. James McMurphy, supplies, Biology 5.00 

2900. David & Ely, supplies 5.57 

2901. Collins & Orland, hardware supplies 33.15 

2902. C. M. Fassett, supplies. Chemistry and Mining 7.90 

2903. The Star-Mirror, printing and office supplies 96.20 

2904. Bausch & Lomb, Optical Co., apparatus, Biology 93.82 

2905. Swann & Coffin, janitor supplies 22.50 

2906. H. P. Eggan, Photographer, services 8.40 

2907. Eiler & Co., supplies. Chemistry 27.50 

2908. Moscow Hardware Co., supplies 5.60 

2909. The Star-Mirror, printing 3.25 

2910. F. G. Burroughs, printing 7.35 

2911. Remington Typewriter Co., typewriter and office supplies 150^20 

2912. J. J. Sterner; prints and slides, publicity 17.85 

2913. E. C. Carey, apparatus, Military 18.00 

2914. The Idaho Post, printing 1.25 

2915. Jones & Dillingham, glass 4.05 

2916. Madison Lumber Co., lumber 45.95 



VI 



APPENDIX. 



No. 

2917. 
2918. 
2919. 
2920. 

3547. 
3548. 
3549. 
3550. 
3551. 
3553. 
3554. 
3555. 

3556. 
3557. 
3558. 
3559. 
3560. 
3561. 
3562. 
3563. 
3564. 
3565. 
3566. 
3567. 
3568. 
3569. 
3570. 
3571. 
3572. 
3574. 
3575. 
3576. 
3577. 
3578. 
3579. 
3580. 
3581. 
3582. 
3583. 
3584. 
3585. 
3586. 
3587. 
3588. 
3589. 
3590. 
3591. 
3592. 
3593. 
3594. 
3595. 
3596. 
3597. 
3598. 
3599. 
3600. 



Name and Service. Amount. 

C. M. Fassett, supplies, Chemistry 5.80 

The Lewiston Tribune, stationery 60.00 

Chas. A. Strellinger Co., equipment, Military 16.00 

H. Channon Co., supplies, tools and equipment, Elec. 

Mech. Engineering and Physics 32.44 

W. S. Morley, traveling expenses 61.00 

A. P. Vaughn, etching, publicity 2.76 

E. M. Hulme, traveling expenses 124.30 

J. S. DeLury, traveling expenses 16.30 

W. S. Morley, traveling expenses 19.95 

J. G. Eldridge, traveling expenses 6.40 

A. P. Vaughn, traveling expenses 7.75 

Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for freight, express, 

postage, telegrams 95.20 

Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for janitor labor 151.62 

A. C. Terrill, traveling expenses 11.25 

Francis Jenkins, traveling expenses, F. A. Fenn 11.80 

C. L. Von Ende, traveling expenses 98.45 

Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for labor 207.20 

Denver Fire Clay Co., supplies. Geology 18.77 

Remington Typewriter Co., supplies 2.75 

Baker & Co., supplies. Chemistry 16.10 

Mine & Smelter Supply Co., apparatus, Physics 40.85 

Central Scientific Co., apparatus. Physics 66.60 

Rhodes Iron Works, grate bars heating plant 31.50 

Troy Lumber Co., furniture 23.00 

The Idaho Post, printing 3.00 

Moscow Electric Supply Co., supplies 8.55 

General Electric Co., supplies 17.85 

Holley-Mason Hardware Co., supplies. Music 12.13 

Portland Seed Co., seeds 11.00 

Lewiston Tribune, printing catalogue 760.40 

The Braun Knecht Co., apparatus, Geology 103.90 

Halliday Machinery Co., machinery, Mech. Eng 422.00 

C. A. Strellinger Co., equipment, Mech. Eng 15.38 

Imer «fe Amend, supplies. Chemistry 1.20 

J. J. Sterner, supplies, publicity 3.85 

A. P. Vaughn, May salary 100.00 

C. W. Colver, extra teaching 10.00 

C. W. Colver, May Salary 25.00 

May Caldwell, April salary 30.00 

May Caldwell, May salary 30.00 

L. P. Shanks, May salary • 125.00 

Elizabeth Stout, salary April 13 to May 13 70.00 

Carl Grissen, May salary 45.00 

Sadie Stockton, May salary 25.00 

Belle Sweet, May salary 83.35 

John Almquist, May salary 60.00 

Nellie A. Regan, May salary 66.65 

E. J. Carey, May salary 50.00 

W. A. Zumhoff, May salary 83.35 

H. C. Oasvod, May salary 83.35 

H. L. AxU'.U, May salary 137.50 

James A. Macljcan, May salary 241.55 

I. J. Cogs\v<-ll, May salary 100.00 

J. G. Eldridge, May salary 166.65 

Francis Jenkins, May salary 95.65 

E. M. Tlulme, May salary 150.00 



APPENDIX 



VII 



No. Name and Service. Amount. 

3601. J. R. Middleton, May salary 66.65 

3602. Etta McGuire, May salary 15.00 

3603. L. W. Jordan, May salary 15.00 

3604. Henry Smith, May salary 25.00 

3605. W. A. Simpson, May salary 60.00 

3606. Evan T. Sage, May salary 91.65 

3607. E. D. Kanag-a, May salary ' 125.00 

3608. A. W. Smith, May salary 75.00 

3609. C. Edmundson, May salary 25.00 

3610. Standard Dray Co., cartage 2.75 

3611. John Almquist, supplies. Domestic Science 3.25 

3612. A. Lietz Co., repairing sextant. Civ. Eng 2.75 

3613. Moscow & Rural Tel. Co., telephone rental 7.50 

3614. The Idaho Post, printing 8.50 

3615. Idaho- Wash. L. & P. Co., light and power 100.10 

3616. Idaho- Wash. L. & P. Co., light and power 95.22 

3617. V. H. Brown, tuning pianos, Music 12.50 

3704. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for grading 141.74 

3705. J. G. Eldridge, balance salary for 1908-09 500.15 

3958. The Nye Scheerer Co., models. Biology 42.30 

4116. James A. MacLean, balance April salary 200.00 

4295. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for freight, express, 
postage and telegrams 131.20 

4296. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for labor 291.40 

4297. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for grading 334.70 

4298. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for janitor labor 158.75 

4299. Burke & James, supplies, publicity 1.85 

4300. N. Williamson, supplies, janitor 4.23 

4301. Moscow Hardware Co., supplies and equipment 59.24 

4302. Chris Anderson, lumber 8.35 

4303. Potlatch Lumber Co., lumber 98.20 

4304. Barnum Lumber Co., lumber 144.48 

4305. Bunker Hill & Sullivan Co., supplies, Mining 10.00 

4306. Eastman- James Co., supplies. Dairy 3.25 

4307. A, L. Vroman, plumbing and apparatus, Civ. Eng.... 105,12 

4308. General Electric Co., apparatus, Elec. Eng 224.50 

4309. Way's Pocket Smelter Co., apparatus, Mining 3.50 

4310. The Idaho Post, printing 6.25 

4311. J. J. Sterner, supplies, publicity 20.80 

4312. The Student Farmer, extra copies 20.00 

4313. Collins & Orland, supplies and equipment 28.15 

4314. Collins & Orland, supplies and equipment, Military.... 26.70 

4315. L. P. Shanks, June salary 125.00 

4316. H. L. Axtell, June salary 137.50 

4317. John Almquist, June salary 60.00 

4318. W. A. Zumhoff, June salary 83.35 

4319. Etta McGuire, June salary 15.00 

4320. Henry Smith, June salary 25.00 

4321. C. Edmundson, June salary 25.00 

4322. James A. MacLean, June salary 241.55 

4323. J. R. Middleton, June salary 66.65 

4324. Permeal French, June salary 100.00 

4325. A. W. Smith, June salary 75.00 

4326. I. J. Cogswell, June salary 100.00 

4327. W. L. Payne, premium on bond 70.00 

4328. L. W. Jordan, typewriting 5 Oq 

4329. E. M. Hulme, June salary 150.00 

4330. C. W. Colver, June salary 25.00 



VIII 



APPENDIX 



No. 

4331. 
4332. 
4333. 
4334. 
4335. 
4336. 
4337. 
4338. 
4339. 
4340. 
4341. 
4347. 
4748. 
4749. 
4750. 
4751. 
4752. 
4753. 
4754. 
4755. 
4756. 
4757. 
4758. 
4759. 
4760. 
4761. 
4762. 
4763. 
4764. 
4765. 
4766. 

4767. 
4768. 
4769. 
4770. 
4771. 
4772. 
4773. 
4774. 
4775. 
4776. 
4777. 
4778. 
4779. 
4780. 
4781. 
4782. 
4783. 
4784. 
4785. 
4786. 
4787. 
4788. 
4789. 
4790. 



479.5. 



Name and Service. Amount. 

Francis Jenl^ins, June salary 97.85 

H. C. Oasved, June salary 83.35 

E. D. Kanaga, June salary 125.00 

Evan T. Sagre, June salary. 91.65 

W. A. Simpson, June salary 60.00 

Belle Sweet, June salary 83.35 

A. P. Vaughn, June salary 100.00 

May Caldwell, June salary 30.00 

Nellie A. Regan, June salary 66.65 

Idaho-Wash. L. & P. Co., light and power 64.84 

Zumhoff & Collins, blacksmithing 16.75 

Sadie Stockton, June salary 25.00 

W. R. Wilkerson, insurance 70.00 

Permeal French, May salary. 100.00 

Moscow & Rural Tel. Co., telephone rental and services. . 10.15 

Capital News Pub. Co., printing and stationery 23.00 

L. S. Gerlough, extra teaching 10.00 

J, C. Flannagan, painting 20.60 

O. E. Benedict, carpenter- work 17.50 

D. H. Hare, extra teaching 10.00 

Moscow & Rural Tel. Co., telephone rental and services. . 9.80 

Collins & Orland, supplies 18.25 

E. Sargent & Co., supplies. Chemistry 5.61 

General Electric Co., supplies 5.04 

Potlatch Lumber Co., lumber 38.60 

C. H. Stoelting & Co., apparatus. Physics 201.41 

The Idaho Post, printing 8.00 

Empire Hardware Co., supplies 6.28 

David & Ely, departmental supplies 4.81 

Barnum, Crosby & Co., printing, publicity 92.70 

Leeds & Northrup Co., apparatus, (Physics $165.78), 

(Elec. Eng. $165.77) 331.55 

N. Williamson, supplies, Biology 6.68 

G. R. Swain, equipment. Classics 21.24 

Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for labor 166.70 

Collins & Orland, supplies, Mining 4.05 

Empire Hardware Co., supplies and equipment 44.98 

The Mine & Smelter Supply Co., apparatus, Physics.... 29.75 

Barns, Crosby Co., supplies, publicity 26.70 

D'avid & Ely Co., supplies, Military 7.50 

W. A. Lauder, sand and cement 17.40 

A. L. Vroman, plumbing supplies 2.50 

Moscow Hardware Co., supplies, Mech. Eng 5.25 

American Entomological Co., supplies, Biology i:!.50 

City of Moscow, water 42.90 

City of Moscow, water 29.09 

The Star-Mirror, printing 35.70 

Frncis Jenkins, cash paid for grading and carpenter work 258.17 

S. E. Hutton, traveling expenses 9.95 

Ph. Soulen, traveling expenses 96.90 

Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for grading 524.05 

H. L. Axtell, traveling expenses 26.05 

E. M. Hulme, traveling expenses 15.90 

Geo. Creighton, equipment, Military 38.45 

Evan T. Sage, traveling expenses 2.95 

Canyon Abstract & Trust Co., insurance Contents School 

of Mines 35.00 

Wm. R. Ched.sey, traveling expenses 31.50 



APPENDIX 



IX 



No. Name and Service. Amount. 

5189. J. R. Middleton, July salary 66.65 

5196. A. L. Vroman, plumbing 18.72 

5191. H. C. Aosved, July salary 83.35 

5192. W. A. Zumhoff, July salary 83.35 

5193. PYancis Jenkins, July salary 108.35 

5194. Permeal French, July salary 100.00 

5195. W. A. Simpson, July salary 65.00 

5196. I. J. Cogswell, July salary 100.00 

5197. H. L. Axtell, July salary 137.50 

5198. Lewis P. Shanks, July salary 125.00 

5199. Nellie A. Regan, July salary 66.65 

5200. A. W. Smith, July salary 75.00 

5201. E. M. Hulme, July salary 150.00 

5202. John Almquist, July salary 65.00 

5203. Evan T. Sage, July salary 91.65 

5204. E. D. Kanaga, July salary 125.00 

5205. Belle Sweet, July salary 83.35 

5206. James A. MacLean, July salary 166.65 

5207. Ruth Broman, July and part of June salary 44.90 

5208. Bruce D. Mudgett, stenographer, part of June salary. . . . 40.00 

5209. Bruce D. Mudgett, July salary 60.00 

5210. E. J. Carey, June salary 50.00 

5211. C. W. Colver, July salary 25.00 

5212. Moscow & Rural Tel Co., telephone rental 9.80 

5213. J. G. Flanagan, painting 44.27 

5214. A. L. Vroman, plumbing 3.25 

5215. Empire Hardware Co., supplies, fireman .25 

5216. The Idaho Post, supplies, Music 2.75 

5217. The Star-Mirror, printing and supplies 25.30 

5218. Potlatch Lumber Co., lumber 2.05 

5219. Brown & Sharpe Mfg. Co., equipment, Civ. Bng 9.68 

5220. Butterfield, Elder Imp. Co., equipment, plow 22.95 

5221. Francis Jenkins, ca,sh advanced express, freight, postage 82.55 

5222. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for departmental labor. . 82.25 

5708. Collins & Orland, supplies and equipment 34.50 

5709. Moscow Hardware Co., supplies. Military .80 

5710. Zumhoff & Collins, repair work 40.00 

5711. Moscow Steam Laundry, Domestic Science 18.75 

5795. Permeal French, traveling expenses 51.75 

6099. H. L. Axtell, August salary 137.50 

6100. I. J. Cogswell, August salary 100.00 

6102. Nellie A. Regan, August salary 66.85 

6101. L J. Cogswell, Sept. salary 100.00 

6103. Lewis P. Shanks, Aug. salary 125.00 

6104. Francis Jenkins, Aug. salary 108.35 

6105. H. C. Aosved, Aug. salary 83.15 

6106. Permeal French, Aug. salary 100.00 

6107. W. A. Simpson, Aug. salary 65.00 

6108. Belle Sweet, Aug. salary 83.15 

6109. Edward M. Hulme, Aug. salary 150.00 

6110. James A. MacLean, Aug. salary •. 166.65 

6111. Ruth Browman, Aug. salary 40.00 

6112. C. W. Colver, Aug. salary 25.00 

6113. J. R. Middleton, Aug. salary 66.85 

6114. Evan T. Sage, Aug. salary 91.85 

6115. W. A. Zumhoff, Aug. salary 83.15 

6116. Chris Anderson, supplies, grading 8.50 

6117. The Genesee News, supplies, envelopes 82.00 



X 



APPENDIX 



No. Name and Service. Amount. 

6118. Eagle Lock Co., equipment, keys 18.07 

6119. H. Channon Co., supplies and equipment, Mech. Eng 17.99 

6120. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for freight, express, 
telegrams and postage 43.82 

•121. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for labor 229.89 

6122. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for labor 81.25 

6123. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for labor 469.44 

6124. The Banker Surety Co., Insurance, Ordnance 16.81 

6125. Thompson Bros., Insurance, Metallurgical Bldg 100.00 

6340. A. P. Vaughn, July salary 100.00 

6341. A. P. Vaughn, August salary 100.00 

6342. E. D. Kanaga, August salary 125.00 

6343. M. L. Romig, labor 113.20 

6344. Ray E. Peebler, August salary 60.00 

6445. Moscow & Rural Telephone Co., Tel. rental 4.00 

6346. Moscow & Rural Telephone Co., Tel. rental 9.15 

6347. The Star-Mirror, printing 5.50 

6348. Idaho Student Farmer, Adv 35.00 

6349. H. P. Eggan, photo for publicity 1.00 

6350. Jones & Dillingham, glass, supplies 9.90 

6351. Troy Lumber Co., lumber 17.15 

6352. David & Ely Co., supplies 6.35 

6353. Holley-Mason Hardware Co., equipment 1.73 

6483. E. M. Hulme, September salary 158.35 

6484. H. L. Axtell, September salary 150.00 

6485. W. A. Zumhof, September salary 81.35 

6486. Belle Sweet, September salary 91.65 

6487. John Almquist, September salary 65.00 

6488. Francis Jenkins, September salary 108.35 

6489. H. C. Oesved, September salary 83.35 

6490. J. A. MacLean, September salary 166.65 

6491. C. W. Colver, September salary 25.00 

6788. J. G. Eldridge, September salary 175.00 

6789. Evan T. Sage, September salary 100.00 

6790. A. E. Smith, September salary 75.00 

6791. W. A. Simpson, September salary 65.00 

6792. E. D. Kanaga, September salary 137.50 

6793. E. J. Carey, September salary 50.00 

6974. May Caldwell, September salary 30.00 

6795. Sadie Stockton, September salary 25.00 

6796. Permeal French, September salary 100.00 

6797. Nellie A. Regan, September salary 75.00 

6798. Smith-Premier Typewriter Co., typewriter 46.25 

6799. Collins & Orland, supplies 21.55 

6800. Madison Lumber Co., lumber 148.15 

6801. Idaho National Harvester Co., labor 20.70 

6802. W. A. Lauder, cement 193.64 

6803. Empire Hardware Co., supplies and equipment 19.90 

6804. Holley-Mason Hardware Co., equipment 1.68 

6805. Potlatch Lumber Co., lumber 472.85 

6806. Collins & Orland, supplies 13.72 

6807. Moscow Hardware Co., supplies .70 

6808. N. P. Ry. Co., freight on coal 80.10 

6809. Electrical World, advertising 8.73 

6810. City of Moscow, water 14.33 

6811. City of Moscow, water 75.05 

6812. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for labor 458.96 

68i:',. I'rancls Jenkins, cash advanced for freight, express, 



APPENDIX 



XI 



No. 

7705. 
7706. 
7707. 
7708. 
7709. 
7710. 
7711. 

7712. 
7713. 

7714. 
7715. 
7716. 
7717. 
7718. 
7719. 



7720. 
7721. 
7722. 
7723. 
7841. 
7908. 
8412. 
8413. 
8414. 



9349. 

9706. 

9707. 

9708. 

9709 

9710. 

9711. 

9712. 

9713. 

9714. 

9715. 

9716. 

9717. 

9902. 

9903. 

9904. 

9905. 

9906. 
10217. 
10218. 
10219. 
10405. 
10406. 
10408. 
10409. 
10410. 



Name and Service, Amount. 

postage and telegrams 62.88 

Fred Skog, wages janitor 40.00 

L. W. Jordan, salary October and one week September 25.00 

Woods & Thomas, insurance Assay Bldg 75.00 

D. W. Driskill, insurance Morrill Hall 35.00 

W. L. Payne, insurance Morrill Hall 70.00 

F. E. Cornwall, insurance Morrill Hall 35.00 

F. E. Cornwall, insurance, barn, farm implements and 

Expr. Station 90. Ov. 

Francis Jenkins, departmental labor 100.00 

Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for freight, express and 

postage 124.95 

The Idaho Post, supplies 16.00 

Underwood Typewriter Co., supplies 1.50 

Divine Water Motor Co., apparatus 6.52 

John W. Graham & Co., Equipment 8.35 

Empire Hardware Co., supplies 11.83 

Collins & Orland, supplies and equipment. Mining ($4.25), 
Domestic Science ($11.70), Janitor ($11.80), General 

($27.20) 54.95 

Shaw & Borden, stationery 17.50 

The Star-Mirror, supplies 87.65 

Denver Fire Clay Co., supplies and equipment, Mining. 213.30 

Owl Drug Store, supplies 60.00 

Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for labor 149.90 

Moscow Hardware Co., supplies 6.85 

Moscow & Rural Telephone Co., telephone rental 7.50 

John W. Graham & Co., supplies, Military 2.50 

R. Hodgins, supplies and equipment, Chemistry ($7.75), 

Physics ($5.00), Library ($4.90), Civ. Eng. ($3.90), Biology 

($6.20), Mining ($8.85), Chemistry ($4.50), General 

($132.35) 173.45 

City of Moscow, sewer tax 124.30 

H. Melgard, insurance, Gymnasium 42.55 

N. Williamson, wood 262.50 

Zumhof & Collins, blacksmithing 13.90 

Empire Hardware Co., Equipment 151.07 

L. H. Tyrrell, sand 5.00 

Remington Typewriter Co., supplies 6.50 

Moscow & Rural Telephone Co., telephone rental 12.30 

Moscow Steam Laundry, laundry 2.50 

Standard Dray Co., carting 28.45 

Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for labor 84.25 

Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for departmental labor. . 98.30 

Francis Jenkins, coal 21.30 

City of Moscow, water 47.00 

Parrott & Co., supplies, janitor 16.00 

Moscow Hardware Co., equipment. Physics 5.45 

Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for departmental labor 111.40 

Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for departmental labor 187.35 

Moscow & Rural Telephone Co., telephone rental 11.50 

Washington Brick, Lime & Sewer Pipe Co., fire clay... 3.00 

O. R. & N. Ry. Co., freight 132.75 

Wilson Transfer Co.. cartage 5.5f^ 

W. H. Lawes. teamster 42.0^ 

Chas. C. Swann, supplies l.O'" 

Valvoline Oil Co., supplies 9.00 

Gunn- Quealty Lumber Co., coal 231.25 



XII 



APPENDIX 



No. 

10411. 
10412. 
10413. 
10414. 
10415. 
10416. 
10417. 
10856. 
10857. 
10858. 
10859. 
10860. 
10861. 
10862. 
10863. 

10864. 
10865. 
10866. 
10867. 
11154. 
11155. 
11156. 
11157. 
11516. 
11517. 
11518. 
11519. 
11520. 
11521. 
11522. 
11523. 
11524. 
11525. 
11526. 
11527. 
11528. 
11529. 
11530. 
11531. 
11768. 
11769. 
11770. 
11771. 
11772. 



11774. 
11775. 
11776. 
11797. 
12160. 
12161. 
12162. 
12163. 
12164. 
12165. 
12166. 



Name and Service. Amount. 

Moscow Electric Supply Co., supplies 25.64 

American Engraving Co., photographs, Publicity 25.35 

Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for departmental labor. . 114.30 

J. F. Nicholson, traveling expenses 19.60 

Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for photos. Publicity... 5.95 

Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for departmental labor. . 224.6b 

Ph. Soulen, traveling expenses 19.65 

E. W. Porter, insurance, School of Mines Bldg 14.00 

Idaho- Wash. L. & P. Co., light and power 100.92 

Standard Dray Co., cartage 35.70 

H. W. Johns -Manville Co., supplies, janitor 13.50 

N. P. Ry. Co., freight 288.57 

N. P. Ry. Co., coal 428.60 

Potlatch Lumber Co., coal 220.50 

Collins & Orland Hardware Co., supplies and equip- 
ment, Mech. Eng. ($29.65), General ($25.65) 55,3?) 

W. N. Day, coal 173.15 

The Idaho Post, blanks, Military 2.50 

Owl Drug Store, supplies 7.75 

Ross R. Sherfey, supplies 3.70 

David &, Ely, supplies 7.20 

The Bankers Surety Co., insurance. Ordnance 5.00 

Remington Typewriter Co., supplies 1.50 

Lewiston Printing Co., supplies stationery 16.00 

L. A. Manring, Insurance, Morrill Hall 35.00 

E. E. Ostroot, Insurance, contents Morrill Hall 35.00 

J. J. Carr, repairing, Military 31.50 

Standard Dray Co., delivering coal 97.65 

V. H. Brown, tuning pianos 20.00 

Gunn-Quealy Coal Co., coal 76.00 

Gunn-Quealy Coal Co., coal 76.75 

J. J. Carr, supplies, Military 8.65 

The Idaho Post, supplies 22.00 

Empire Hardware Co., equipment 23.87 

O. R. & N. Co., coal 138.15 

O. R. & N. Co., coal 136.80 

Madison Lumber Co., lumber 14.40 

J. W. Blacker, plants, arborvitae 112.50 

Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for labor 313.65 

Permeal French, traveling expenses 8.60 

O. R. & N. Co., coal 135.00 

Gunn-Quealty Coal Co., coal 75.00 

F. O. Berg Co., rent of tents, Military 87.00 

Frank Stewart, annual advertising and cut 25.00 

Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for departmental labor. . 98.00 
Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for freight, telegrams, 

and postage 33.57 

F. D. Farrell, traveling expenses 33.20 

J. H. Frandson, traveling expenses 88.20 

E. M. Hulme, traveling expenses 160.05 

Idaho-Wash. L. & P. Co., light and power 76.52 

Standard Dray Co., cartage 51.55 

Moscow & Rural Telophono Co., phone rental 16.58 

Collins <fe Orland Hardware Co., supplies 41.15 

The Star- Mirror, supr>lies and printing 63.50 

Mo.scow Commission Co., oats. Agriculture 8.45 

August Cast Bank Note & Lithograph Co., diplomas... 26.50 

Ph. Soulfn, traveling expenses 76.40 



APPENDIX 



XIII 



No. Name and Service. Amount. 

12288. Student Farmer, extra copies and cut 25.95 

12357. O. G. Vroman, plumbing 24.00 

12358. Smith-Premier Typewriter Co., supplies 1.50 

12359. Zumhof & Collins, repairing and supplies 9.00 

12360. Jones & Dillingham, glass 3.90 

12620. Idaho Post, printing, stationery and pamphlets 9.50 

12621. Bankers' Surety Co., insurance on U. S. Ordnance 

Stores and Equipment 29.00 

13107. J. G. Eldridge, traveling expense 10.85 

13345. Shaw-Borden & Co., notary seal 3.71 

13346. Burrough's Adding Machine Co., 12 rolls paper 1.20 

13347. Lewiston Printing & Binding Co., office supplies 4.75 

13348. John P. Nicholson, traveling expense 8.50 

13517. Moscow Steam Laundry, janitor laundry 4.30 

13518. Spokane Brush & Waxine Co., 600 lbs. Dustless w^axine 18.00 

13519. Elmer R. Dewey, 31 yards sand at $1.50 47.25 

13520. David & Ely Co., lye for janitor 1.00 

13521. B. M. Hulme, traveling expense 103.10 

13522. W. A. Lauder, cement and plaster 337.70 

13523. Sundry labor at grading 69.40 

13938. Nils Peterson, plumbing and plumbing supplies 33.85 

13939. Holley-Mason Hardware Co., heating plant tools and 

supplies 18.93 

13940. Bursar, exhibits ($15.00), postage and envelopes ($90.70), 

telegrams ($4.32), supplies ($2.30) 112.32 

13941. Bursar, shoveling coal and concrete ($49.50), carpen- 

ter labor ($30.12), delivering 20 yards sand ($27.00)... 106.62 

14142. Moscow Rural Tel. Co., telephone 11.50 

14143. Spokane & Inland R. R. Co., freight and duty on coal.. 1,382.89 

14144. O. R. & N. R. R. Co., freight and duty on coal 902.76 

14145. Standard Dray Co., hauling 545 ^/^ tons coal at 50c.... 272.75 

14146. Chas. C. Swann, janitor supplies 21.00 

Pending, Bursar, postage stamps 10.35 



Grand total 



$46,000.00 



SCHOOL OF SCIENCE FUND. 



3. Idaho-Wash. L. & P. Co., General, light and power $ 40.00 

4. Idaho-Wash. L. & P. Co., General, light and power 14.25 

5. Idaho- Wash. L. & P. Co., General, light 11.75 

6. Naylor & Cummings, Insurance premium 37.50 

7. Naylor & Cummings, Insurance premium 37.50 

8. John S. Grogan, September salary 130.00 

9. Ruth Broman, September salary 40.00 

10. Idaho- Wash. L. & P. Co., light, General 4.00 

11. Idaho-Wash. L. & P. Co., General, light 14.62 

12. Francis Jenkins, Departmental sundry labor 218.50 

13. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for labor 488.28 

14. A. L. Vroman, General, plumbing 9.00 

15. A. S. Whiteway & Co., Civ. Eng., equipment 7.45 

16. Empire Hardware Co., General, supplies, oil, locks and glass 21.78 

17. Remington Typewriter Co., Library, supplies .75 

18. Potlatch Lumber Co., General, equipment 59.35 

19. D. W. Driskel, Insurance premium 20.00 

20. W. C. Barge, Insurance premium 25.00 

21. T. B. West, Insurance premium 50.00 

22. F. E. Cornwall, Insurance premium 12.00 



XIV 



APPENDIX 



No, 

23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 
27. 
28. 
29. 
30. 
31. 
32. 
33. 
34. 
35. 
36. 
37. 
38. 
39. 
40. 
41. 
42. 

43. 
44. 
45. 

46. 
47. 
48. 

49. 
50. 
51. 
52. 
53. 
54. 
55. 
56. 
57. 
58. 
59. 
60. 
61. 
62. 
63. 
64. 
6.'>. 
66. 



67. 

68. 
69. 
70. 
71. 

72. 
73. 



Name and Service. Amount. 

E. W. Porter, Insurance premium 20.00 

Collins & Orland Hardware Co., General, equipment, glass 3.50 

Ginn & Co., General, supplies, books 27.00 

Ross R. Sherfey, General, supplies 4.25 

Williamson Furniture Co., Dormitory furniture and carpets 417.71 

Valvoline Oil Co., General, supplies 21.50 

General Electric Co., General, supplies 155.33 

Standard Lumber Co., General, equipment 71.30 

Clias. C. Swann, General, supplies 8.40 

"Westinghouse Elec. & Manfg. Co., General, equipment... 13.24 

Idaho- Wasli. L. & P. Co., General, light - 89.68 

Idaho- Wash. L. & P. Co., General, power 19.92 

V. H. Brown, labor, tuning pianos 26.50 

Engineering & Mining Journal, General, Adv 1.50 

Tribune Company, General, Adv 6.40 

Idaho- Wash. L. & P. Co., General, light and power 29.24 

May Caldwell, October salary 30.00 

John S. Grogan, October salary 130.00 

Francis Jenkins, Departmental sundry labor 106.95 

David & Ely Co., equipment, Library ($37.50), Forestry 

($10.20), General ($1.23) 48.93 

Potlatch Lumber Co., General, equipment, lumber 91.95 

H. Seller & Co., Forestry, equipment 20.00 

Moscow Hardware Co., equipment, Civ. Eng. ($3.05), Biol- 
ogy ($2.00), General ($1.45) 6.50 

Shaw & Borden Co., General, supplies, memo heads 4.75 

Madison Lumber Co., coal 246.75 

Kenyon Printing & Mfg. Co., General, supplies, mailing 

tubes 9.00 

Moscow Electric Supply Co., General, supplies 3.50 

Electric Appliance Co., Elec. Eng., equipment 37.31 

Empire Hardware Co., General, supplies 1.02 

The Star-Mirror, General, supplies, paper 16.35 

Francis Jenkins, Departmental sundry labor 112.60 

Francis Jenkins, Departmental sundry labor 115.15 

City of Moscow, General, water 106.25 

Idaho-Wash. L. & P. Co., General, light and power 149.44 

Idaho- Wash. L. & P. Co., General, power 14.40 

Idaho-Wash. L. & P. Co., General, power 20.24 

George F. Sprague, Insurance premium 100.00 

Herman J. Rossi, Insurance premium 37.50 

Herman J. Rossi, Insurance premium 37.50 

Spokane Brush & Waxine Co., General, supplies 12.00 

Electric Appliance Co., General, equipment 80.38 

Narragansett Machine Co., Physical Culture, apparatus.. 9.81 

Standard Dray Co., General, draying 13.50 

Francis Jenkin.s, freight, Mining ($22.89), Biology ($7.65), 
Dom. Art ($2.62), Military ($5.99), General ($16.21), post- 
age and telegrams ($29.48) 84.84 

A. H. Purdue, Sec'y., dues to Nat'n'l Ass'n State Min- 
ing Schools 15.00 

C. H. Sliattuck, traveling expenses 9.05 

I'YarK^is Jenkins, Departmental sundi-y labor 10.30 

I'Yancis Jenkins, Departmental sundry Ial>or 166.25 

OWlins & C)rland, e(juipmf'nt, Mining ($7.<S.')), Civ. Eng. 

($11.75), General ($32.55) 52.15 

The Idaho Post, printing cards, General 6.00 

Standard Draj' Co., General, freight 1.00 



APPENDIX 



XV 



No. Name and Service. Amount. 

74. Smith-Premier Typewriter Co., General, supplies .75 

75. General Electric Co., General, supplies 96.23 

76. David & Ely Co., General, supplies ($11.20), Music, equip- 
ment ($18.00) ,. 29.20 

77. Francis Jenkins, Departmental sundry labor 156.70 

78. Idaho-Wash. L. & P. Co., light and power, General 19.55 

79. Idaho- Wash. L. & P. Co., light and power. General 151.12 

80. D. M. Eckman, Insurance premium 26.88 

81. R. Hodgins, supplies, Physics ($4.20), Music ($5.32), Civ. 
Eng. ($4.35), Mining ($8.85), Biology ($6.40), General 
($21.75) 50.87 

82. General Electric Co., General, supplies 41.53 

83. Smith-Premier Typewriter Co., General, supplies .75 

84. Francis Jenkins, freight, Forestry ($66.18), Chemistry 
($33.80), Mech. Eng. ($7.12), General ($31.49), postage and 
telegrams ($27.06) 165.65 

85. Idaho-Wash. L. & P. Co., General, light and power 156.72 

86. Idaho- Wash. L. & P. Co., General, light and power 18.27 

87. Gunn-Quealty Coal Co., coal 72.00 

88. Owl Drug Store, General, suppplies 67.65 

89. Gunn-Quealy Coal Co., coal 144.75 

90. Troy Lumber Mfg. Co., Preparatory, equipment 50.00 

91. Bushong «Sr Co., General, supplies, books 5.25 

92. O. R. & N. Co., freight on coal 283.50 

93. The Divine Water Motor Co., Scientific apparatus 15.38 

94. Shaw & Borden Co., General, supplies, stationery 13.28 

95. C. W. Van der Veer, March salary 100.00 

96. Sadie Stockton, March salary 25.00 

97. J. G. Eldridge, March salary 175.00 

98. W. A. Zumhof, March salary 83.35 

99. E. H. Collens, March salary 50.00 

100. I. J. Cogswell, March salary 120.00 

101. H. L. Axtell, March salary 180.00 

102. L. W. Jordan, March salary 20.00 

103. E. M. Hulme, March salary 190.00 

104. Mrs. Miriam Sage, March salary 50.00 

105. Fred Skog, March salary 65.00 

106. John Almquist, March salary 65.00 

107. Carl C. Rice, March salary 160.00 

108. E. D. Kanaga, March salary 165.00 

109. Evan T. Sage, March salary 120.00 

110. Mrs. Miriam Sage, February salary 37.50 

111. A. W. Smith, March salary 90.00 

112. James A. MacLean, March salary 166.65 

113. Francis Jenkins, March salary 108.35 

114. Mayme Crow, March salary 60.00 

115. Nellie A. Regan, March salary 90.00 

116. Belle Geddes, March salary 50.00 

117. Permeal French, March salary 120.00 

118. Belle Sweet, March salary 91.65 

119. W. A. Simpson, March salary 65.00 

120. Idaho- Wash. L. & P. Co., General, light and power 49.88 

121. Idaho- Wash. L. & P. Co., General, light and power 20.16 

122. H. Melgard, Insurance premium 14.00 

123. General Electric Co., General supplies 9.12 

124. Standard Lumber Co., coal 33.25 

125. The Star-Mirror, supplies, Music ($7.50), Mining ($6.75 
General ($109.88), Pass lists and stationery 124.13 



XVI 



APPENDIX 



No, Name and Service. Amount, 

126. Parrott & Co., General, soap, floor oil, etc, supplie.s 120.25 

127. Owl Drug- Store, General, supplies 4.50 

128. Ross R. Sherfey, supplies, Music 2,30 

129. May Caldwell, March salary 30.00 

130. John S, Grogan, March salary 130,00 

131. E. J. Carey, March salary 50,00 

132. Siidie Stockton, April salary 25,0( 

133. Belle Geddes, April salary 50.00 

134. Belle Sweet, April salary 91.65 

135. Frank Kelly, Music, equipment 8,50 

136. Williamson Furniture Co., Music, equipment 7.50 

137. Permeal French, April salary 120.00 

138. Miriam Sage, April salary 50.00 

139. I. J, Cogswell, April salary 120,00 

140. John S. Grogan, April salary 130.00 

141. E. D. Kanaga, April salary 165.00 

142. James A. MacLean, April salary 166,65 

143. A. W. Smith, April salary 90.00 

144. Francis Jenkins, April salary 108.35 

145. Carl C. Rice, April salary 160,00 

146. Evan T. Sage, April salary 120,00 

147. May Caldwell, April salary 30.00 

148. Mayme Crow, April salary 60,00 

149. John Almquist, April salary 65.00 

150. E. H. Collens, April salary 50.00 

151. Fred Skog, April salary 65.00 

152. H, L. Axtell, April salary 180.00 

153. W, A, Simpson, April salary 65.00 

154. C, W, Van der Veer, April salary 100.00 

155. L. W. Jordan, April salary 20.00 

156. W. A. Zumhof, April salary 83.35 

157. J. G. Eldridge, April salary 175.00 

158. Nellie A, Regan, April salary 90.00 

159. E. M. Hulme, April salary 190.00 

160. Idaho- Wash. L. & P. Co., light and power 16.95 

161. Francis Jenkins, freight. Physics (.$13.04), Military 
$27.78), Biology ($8.40), Civ. Eng. ($2.45), General ($13.26) 64.93 

162. Carl C. Rice, May salary 160.00 

163. E. M. Hulme, May salary 190.00 

164. John Almquist, May salary 65.00 

165. L. W, Jordan, May salary 20.00 

166. Miriam Sage, May salary 50.00 

167. Evan T. Sage, May salary 120.00 

168. Fred Skog, May salary 65.00 

169. Nellie A. Regan, May salary 90.00 

170. Belle Sweet, May salary 91.65 

171. Francis Jenkins, May .salary 108.35 

172. Belle Geddes, May salary 50.00 

173. James A. MacLean, May salary 166.65 

174. Mayme Crow, May salary 60.00 

175. Sadie Stockton, May salary 25.00 

176. May Caldwell, May salary 30.00 

177. A. W. Smith, May salary 90.00 

178. John S. Grogan, May salary 130.00 

179. J. G. Eldridge, May salary 175.00 

180. Noycs Ladd, May salary 45.00 

181. W. A. Simpson, May salary 65,00 

182. W. A. Zumhof, May salary 83.35 



APPENDIX 



XVII 



No. Name and Service. Amount. 

183. E. D. Kanaga, May salary 165.00 

184. E. H. Collens, May salary 50.00 

185. C. W. Van der Veer, May salary 100.00 

186. H. L. Axtell, May salary .- 180.00 

187. I. J. Cogswell, May salary 120.00 

188. Belle Sweet, balance salary College year 1909-10 274.95 

189. John D. Bloomfield, Insurance premium 38.00 

190. E. J. Carey, April salary 50.00 

191. E. J. Carey, May salary 50.00 

192. Permeal French, May salary 50.00 

193. Foote Mineral Co., Geology, supplies ($29.53), equip- 
ment ($58.14) 87.67 

195. Idaho-Wash. L. & P. Co., General, light and power 62.72 

196. Idaho-Wash. L. & P. Co., General, light and power 20.78 

197. The Denver Fire Clay Co., supplies and apparatus, Mining 126.15 

198. The Star-Mirror, printing and stationery 68.18 

200. Moscow & Rural Telephone Co., telephone rental 12.80 

201. Idaho- Wash. L. & P. Co., power 16.93 

202. Idaho-Wash. L. & P. Co., light 44.08 

203. Moscow & Rural Telephone Co., rental 11.95 

204. Star-Mirrror, printing and envelopes 22.65 

205. Standard Dray Co., draying 59.90 

206. O. R. & N. Ry. Co., coal, freight 195.00 

207. Lewiston Tribune, printing catalogue 868.00 

208. Spokane & Inland R. R. Co., coal, freight 545.93 

209. James G. Biddle, apparatus, Elec. Eng 91.00 

210. Standard Oil Co., oil, Mining 18.85 

211. Her & Co., alcohol 29.56 

212 John W. Graham & Co., supplies, office 3.20 

213. Standard Lumber Co., coal 3.70 

214. O. R. & N. Ry. Co., cc al, freight 543.83 

215. W. N. Day, coal 241.70 

216. Idaho Post, printing 16.50 

217. Francis Jenkins, advanced for labor 120.45 

218. Francis Jenkins, freight and express 73.84 

219. Francis Jenkins, labor ($32.20), postage ($45.00), fuel 

($1.25) 78.45 

220. Crane Company, equipment 24.33 

221. Standard Dray Co., hauling coal 101.00 

222. W. N. Day, coal 652.87 

223. Yawman & Erbe Co., supplies, office 65.63 

224. Moscow Hardware Co., supplies 4.40 

225. Keuffel & Esser, apparatus, Civ. Eng 3.89 

226. Heller & Brightly, apparatus, Civ. Eng 3.90 

227. Francis Jenkins, advanced for labor 141.55 

229. V. H. Brown, tuning piano, Music 32.50 

230. Chas. A. Strollinger, tools 87.37 

231. Eugene Dietzgen, supplies. Civ. Eng 29.17 

232. The Frederick Post Co., supplies, Civ. Eng 6.80 

233. Francis Jenkins, advanced for janitor labor 86.85 

234. Moscow & Rural Telephone Co., telephone rental 11.75 

236. Idaho- Wash. L. & P. Co., light 25.56 

237. Idaho-Wash. L. & P. Co., light 9.56 

238. Idaho-Wash. L. & P. Co., power 21.60 

239. Star-Mirror, printing 20.50 

240. Idaho- Wash. L. & P. Co., light and power 14.52 

241. Idaho-Wash. L. & P. Co., light and power 7.16 

242. American Entomological Co., supplies. Biology 5.90 



XVIII 



APPENDIX 



No. Name and Service. Amount. 

243. Empire Hardware Co., supplies, General 66.77 

244. W. A. Lauder, cement 61.85 

245. C. C. Tull, cash advanced for photographs, Publicity 4.75 

246. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for Departmental labor. . . 167.15 

247. H. S. Knowles, Insurance, Liszt Hall 70.00 

248. Veatch Realty Co., Insurance, fuel in Central Heating 

Plant 13.25 

249. Herman J. Rossi, Insurance, School of Mines, Ridenbaugh 

Hall 129.20 

250. C. & M. E. Lewis Co., Insurance, School of Mines 42.00 

251. Idaho- Wash. L. & P. Co., light and power 12.09 

252. Idaho-TVash. L. & P. Co., light and power 90.24 

253. Crane Co., plumbing supplies 11.80 

254. Idaho- Wash. L. & P. Co., equipment, Dormitory 6.05 

255. Standard Lumber Co., lumber 94.60 

256. Weston Electrical Co., apparatus, Physics 165.75 

257. W. C. Barge, Insurance, Ridenbaugh Hall 47.50 

Total $20,134.15 

UNIVERSITY FUND. 

2. H. L. Axtell, Classics, January salary $ 137.50 

3. W. A. Simpson, watchman, January salary 60.00 

4. A. P. Vaughn, Sociology, January salary 100.00 

5. Lewis P. Shanks, Romance Languages, December salary 125.00 

6. Evan T. Sage, Classics, January salary 91.65 

7. Nellie A. Regan, German, January salary 66.65 

8. Belle Sweet, Librarian, January salary 83.35 

9. Permeal French, Dean of Women, January salary 100.00 

10. Gertrude Stephenson, stenographer, December salary.... 12.50 

11. John Almquist, gardener, January salary 60.00 

12. E. M. Hulme, History, January salary 150.00 

13. E. J. Carey, band master, December salary : . . . 50.00 

14. Sadie Stockton, Music, October and November salary... 55.00 

15. Ella Woods, stenographer, September salary 14.00 

16. Ray Lyman, printing 17.50 

17. E. J. Chesley, janitor labor 29.2.1 

18. H. C. Oasved, carpenter, January salary 83.35 

19. The Caxton Printers, printing 14.00 

20. Jay Weeks, draying 4.00 

21. Oregonian Publishing Co., advertising, Agriculture 12.00 

22. H. Butler, janitor labor 10.00 

23. J. C. Flanagan, painting 10.85 

24. Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Co., telephone rental.... 7.50 

25. H. A. Scheyer, labor 3.50 

26. O. A. Bnnodict, carpenter work 12.00 

27. H. H. DauK, labor 25.00 

28. Madison Lumber Co., lumber 8.45 

29. Empire Harware Co., supplies, Domestic Art 19.46 

30. John S. Piper, supr)li('S, Donu^stic Art 1.90 

31. iJcnvf-r Fire C'lay Co., ai)r)aratus. Geology 5.10 

32. The Graham Manfg. Co., equipment 1.33 

33. Potlatch Lumber Co., lumber 64.05 

34. Brfiun Knocht Co., supi»]i<'S, Chemistry 47.01 

35. Df-nvf-r l''ir(! Clay Co., apparatus, Mining 32.90 

36. Hollcy-Mason Co., janitor's tools 6.23 

37; Moscow Hardware (U)., Murcseo 22.45 



APPENDIX 



XIX 



No. Name and Service. Amount. 

38. Spokane Brush Co., waxine 6.00 

39. Collins & Orland Hardware Co., Departmental equipment 84.45 

40. Butterfield-Elder Imp. Co., equipment 13.37 

41. Star-Mirror, printing - 75.35 

42. A. L. Vroman, plumbing supplies 2.40 

43. Swann & Coffin, janitor supplies 16.00 

44. David & Ely, supplies 5.70 

45. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced, Departmental labor.... 60.75 

46. J. H. Frandson, traveling expenses 4.00 

47. E. E. Elliott, traveling expenses 55.05 

48. Francis Jenkins, freight, express, telegrams, stamps 49.59 

49. Francis Jenkins, advanced for janitor labor 115.00 

50. Myron C. Clark Co., Eng. World — Civ. Eng 3.00 

51. Bankers' Surety Co., premium on bond 9.12 

52. A. A. Purdue, membership fee in Mining School Ass'n.... 15.00 

53. Geo. E. Fellows, annual dues Ass'n. State Universities... 20.00 

54. Idaho- Wash. L. & P. Co., light and power 103.24 

55. O. A. Benedict, carpenter work 70.75 

56. Marion Zumhoff, janitor work 2.25 

57. Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co., rental 7.50 

58. A. L. Vroman, plumbing 116.00 

59. A. L. Vroman, plumbing 27.25 

60. Francis Jenkins, freight, express, postage, telegrams.... 85.70 

61. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for janitor labor 192.05 

62. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for departmental labor. . 27.15 

63. E. M. Hulme, February salary 150.00 

64. Ella Woods, February salary 25.00 

65. A. W. Smith, Commandant, February salary 75.00 

66. J. R. Middleton, Athletic Instructor, February salary 66.65 

67. Eber D. Kanaga, Physical Education, September salary. . 125.00 

68. Etta McGuire, Assistant Librarian, February salary 15.00 

69. A. P. Vaughn, February salary 100.00 

70. Nellie A. Regan, February salary 66.65 

71. H. L. Axtell, February salary 137.50 

72. John Almquist, February salary 60.00 

73. William Simpson, February salary 60.00 

74. W. A. Zumhoff, February salary 83.35 

75. Francis Jenkins, February salary 95.65 

76. Sadie Stockton, February salary 25.00 

77. Evan T. Sage, February salary 91.65 

78. May Caldwell, Music, February salary 30.00 

79. J. G. Eldridge, February salary 166.65 

80. H. C. Oesved, February salary 83.35 

81. I. J. Cogswell, February salary 100.00 

83. Belle Sweet, February salary 83.35 

82. Carl Grissen, February salary 45.00 

84. Carl Grissen, January salary 45.00 

85. Gertrude Stephenson, January salary 12.50 

86. E. J. Carey, January salary 50.00 

87. J. Hansen, labor 3.00 

88. Lewis P. Shanks, January salary 125.00 

89. Western Union Tel. Co., clock rental 15.00 

90. O. A. Benedict, carpenter work 42.00 

91. Idaho- Wash. L. & P. Co., light and power 127.21 

92. Moscow Transfer Co., draying 3.00 

93. E. J. Chesley, janitor work 9.25 

94. Moscow Hardware Co., departmental supplies 4.00 

95. Jones & Dillingham, glass 2.40 



XX APPENDIX 

No. Name and Service. Amount. 

96. Idaho Post, printing 2.50 

97. Idaho Post, printing 6.85 

98. McGraw Publishing Co., books, Civ. Eng 5.10 

99. Union Iron Worlds, equipment, Civ. Eng 18.40 

100. Troy Lumber Co., sash bars, Horticulture 22.20 

101. E. J. Carey, February salary 50.00 

102. Permeal French, February salary. 100.00 

103. Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co., telephone service 8.80 

104. Mrs. L. O. Rayburn, supplies, janitor 4.32 

105. Idaho- Wash. L. & P. Co., light and power 139.39 

106. J. C. Flanagan, painting 19.25 

107. Delaval Dairy Supply Co., apparatus, Dairy 27.07 

108. General Electric Co., equipment 17.01 

109. The Star-Mirror, printing 12.00 

110. General Electric Co., equipment 16.27 

111. W. P. Fuller & Co., supplies, Elec. Eng 1.74 

112. Moscow Hardware Co., equipment 8.38 

113. Monarch Telephone Manfg. Co., equipment, Elec. Eng. . . . 21.11 

114. General Electric Co., equipment Elec. Eng 6.78 

115. Chris Anderson, repairs to wagon 2.75 

116. The Owl Drug Store, supplies, janitor 3.75 

117. The DePere Tablet Co., examination books 45.00 

118. Grice & Son, furniture, Dormitory 60.30 

119. Madison Lumber Co., lumber 45.35 

120. Atlas School Supply Co., maps, Classics 8.85 

121. W. H. Tomlinson, specimens, Geology 49.00 

122. Central Scientific Co., apparatus. Civ. Eng 4.49 

123. Collins & Orland Hardware Co., supplies 23.05 

124. General Electric Co., supplies, Elec. Eng 18.00 

125. N. Williamson, supplies. Domestic Art 5.00 

126. Geo. Creighton, supplies, Agriculture 3.40 

127. Dennison Manfg. Co., supplies. Chemistry 1.35 

128. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for janitor labor 166.38 

129. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for freight and ex- 

press, telegrams and postage 53.38 

130. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for labor 89.20 

131. J. J. Anthony, postoffice case 56.00 

132. Central Scientific Co., apparatus, Chemistry 4.43 

133. H. Channon Co., apparatus, Mech. Eng 17.29 

134. Moscow Steam Laundry, laundry janitor 3.75 

135. Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co., rental 8.40 

136. Idaho Post, printing 11.35 

137. A. L. Vroman, plumbing 8.30 

138. Standard Dray Co., draying 1.00 

139. Moscow Hardware Co., equipment and supplies 13.45 

140. Zumhoff & Collins, blacksmithing 20.50 

141. Valvoline Oil Co., oil 4.50 

142. J. N. Friedman, harness 21.00 

143. Geo. Creighton, supr'lios, Domestic Art .40 

144. A. L. Vroman, plumbing 2.70 

145. E. H. Sargent, supplies. Bacteriology 7.60 

146. W. A. Lauder, supplies. Civ. Eng 1.75 

147. lAmfr A Amnnd, supplies. Chemistry .43 

148. Potlatch Luinbcr Co., lumber 18.25 

149. Empire Hardware Co., supplies 7.16 

150. David & Ely, supplies. Domestic Economy (.$64.48), Jani- 

tor r$28.40), Domestic Art (.$6.45), Military ($16.75), 

Mining ($2.37), Gymnasium ($43.00) 162.45 



APPENDIX 



XXI 



No. Name and Service. Amount. 

15JL. J. T. Baker, supplies, Chemistry 2.90 

152. Collins & Orland, supplies 12.75 

153. The Moran Co., apparatus, Civ. Eng 5.05 

154. R. Hodgins, Departmental supplies' 124.25 

155. E. D. Kanaga, February salary 125.00 

156. The N. E. A. membership dues 2.00 

163. Spokane & Inland R. R., freight on coal 982.76 

164. John Almquist, October salary 65.00 

165. Permeal French, October salary and September balance.. 140.00 

166. Sadie Stockton, October salary 25.00 

167. W. A. Simpson, October salary 65.00 

168. W. A. Zumhoff, October salary 83.35 

169. Belle Sweet, October salary 91.65 

170. H. L. Axtell, October salary and September balance... 210.00 

171. Ruth Browman, October salary 40.00 

172. E. D. Kanaga, October salary and September balance.... 192.50 

173. J. G. Eldridge, October salary 175.00 

174. I. J. Cogswell, October salary and September balance 140.00 

175. Fred Skog, janitor, October salary 65.00 

176. E. M. Hulme, October salary and September balance 221.65 

177. A. W. Smith, October salary and September balance 105.00 

178. Evan T. Sage, October salary and September balance 140.00 

179. Carl C. Rice, October salary 160.00 

180. Nellie A. Regan, October salary and September balance. . . 105.00 

181. James A. MacLean, October salary, 166.65 

182. Francis Jenkins, October salary 108.35 

183. Jones & Dillingham, glass 16.10 

184. Idaho Post, printing 2.20 

185. Belle Geddes, stenographer, September salary 50.00 

186. Belle Geddes, August salary 12.50 

187. Belle Geddes, October salary 50.00 

188. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced f)or freight, express, 

postage and telegrams 127.48 

189. Moscow Transfer Co., draying 4.00 

190. Fred Skog, November salary 65.00 

191. Belle Geddes, November salary 50.00 

192. J. G. Eldridge, November salary 175.00 

193. I. W. Jordan, November salary 20.00 

194. Nellie A. Regan, November salary 90.00 

195. Belle Sweet, November salary 91.65 

196. Sadie Stockton, November salary 25.00 

197. May Caldwell, November salary 30.00 

198. A. W. Smith, November salary 90.00 

199. E. M. Hulme, November salary 190.00 

200. I. J. Cogswell, November salary 120.00 

201. W. A. Simpson, November salary 65.00 

202. Francis Jenkins, November salary 108.35 

203. James A. MacLean, November salary 166.65 

204. John S. Grogan, November salary 130.00 

205. W. A. Zumhoff, November salary 85.35 

206. Carl C. Rice, November salary 160.00 

207. Evan T. Sage, November salary 120.00 

208. Ruth Browman, November salary 40.00 

209. John Almquist, November salary 65.00 

210. H. L. Axtell, November salary 180.00 

211. Permeal French, November salary 120.00 

212. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for labor 166.97 

213. R. Pickering, insurance, Administration Bldg 15.00 



XXII 



APPENDIX 



No. Name and Service. Amount. 

214. N. Williamson, supplies 3.93 

215. A. L. Vroman, plumbing 45.30 

216. E. J. Carey, December salary 50.00 

217. E. J. Carey, November salary 50.00 

218. Mrs. Crow, November salary 50.00 

219. E. D. Kanaga, November salary 165.00 

220. Permeal French, December salary 120.00 

221. W. A. Simpson, December salary. 65.00 

222. A. W. Smith, December salary 90.00 

223. Nellie A. Regan, December salary 90.00 

224. John Almquist, December salary 65.00 

225. May Caldwell, December salary 30.00 

226. E. J. Carey, October salary 50.00 

227. Belle Geddes, December salary 50.00 

228. E. M. Hulme, December salary 190.00 

229. Mrs. Crow, December salary 50.00 

230. Carl C. Rice, December .salary 160.00 

331. Fred Skog. December salary 65.00 

232. J. G. Eldridge, December salary 175.00 

233. H. L. Axtel, December salary 180.00 

234. Ruth Browman, December salary 40.00 

235. Sadie Stockton, December salary 25.00 

236. W. A. Zumhoff, December salary 83.35 

237. I. W. Jordan, December salary 20.00 

238. John S. Grogan, December salary 130.00 

239. Belle Sweet, December salary 91.65 

240. I. J. Cogswell, December salary 120.00 

241. Western Union Telegraph Co., clock rental 15.00 

242. Richards & Haga, legal services 150.00 

243. Evan T. Sage, December salary 120.00 

244. Francis Jenkins, December salary 108.35 

245. James A. MacLean, December salary 166.65 

246. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for janitor labor 122.25 

247. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for departmental labor. . 68.10 

248. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for labor 96.25 

249. L. A. Manring, insurance Ridenbaugh Hall 55.75 

250. N. Williamson, supplies. Military 6.18 

251. Geo. E. Fellows, State Univ. Assn. fee 10.00 

252. D. W. Driskill, insurance on barn 22.50 

253. L. A. Manring, insurance Ridenbaugh Hall 33.25 

254. T. J. Cooper, insurance Heating Plant 40.00 

255. Richard Groo, insurance Armory 70.00 

256. A. W. Oversmith, insurance Armory 28.00 

257. Engineering News, Adv. Civ. Eng 1.62 

258. Eber D. Kanaga, December salary 165.00 

259. Francis Jenkins, hauling coal, cash advanced 112.86 

260. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for coal 20.94 

261. C. N. Little, traveling expenses 39.25 

262. Moscow Hardware Co., glass 3.00 

263. Maple Leaf Coal Co., coal 485.06 

264. Star-Mirror, printing and stationery 16.00 

265. N. Williamson, pinno. Music 466.32 

266. Moscow & Rural Tel. Co., rental 27.55 

267. O. R. & N. Ry. Co., freight on coal 129.60 

268. Mrs. Crow, January salary 60.00 

269. Fred Skog, January .salary 65.00 

270. VV. A. Simi)Son, January .salary 65.00 

271. Evan T, Sage, January .salary 120.00 



APPENDIX 



XXIII 



No. Name and Service. Amount. 

272. Nellie A. Regan, January salary 90 

273. J. G. Eldridge, January salary 175 

274. Ruth Browman, January salary 40 

275. John S. Grogan, January salary..- 130 

276. James A. MacLean, January salary 166 

277. I. W. Jordan, January salary 20 

278. Sadie Stockton, January salary 25 

279. John Almquist, January salary 65 

280. May Caldwell, January salary 30 

281. Carl C. Rice, January salary 160 

282. A. W. Smith, January salary 90 

283. Francis Jenkins, January salary 108 

284. Belle Geddes, January salary 50 

285. W. A. Zumhof, January salary 83 

286. E. M. Hulme, January salary 190 

287. I. J. Cogswell, January salary 120 

288. H. L. Axtell, January salary 180 

289. Permeal French, January salary 120 

290. E. D. Kanaga, January salary 165 

291. Belle Sweet, January salary 91 

292. E. H. Collens, Instructor in Music, January salary 50 

293. Syms York Co., printing reports 160 

294. The DePere Tablet Co., examination books 68 

295. W. A. Zumhoff, February salary 83 

296. E. H. Collens, February salary 50 

297. I. J. Cogswell, February salary 120 

298. E. J, Carey, January salary 50 

299. Belle Geddes, January salary 50 

300. Evan T. Sage, February salary 120 

301. L. W. Jordan, February salary 20 

302. Fred Skog, February salary 65 

303. May Caldwell, February salary 30. 

304. John S. Grogan, February salary 130. 

305. Francis Jenkins, February salary 108. 

306. James A. MacLean, February salary ; . . . 166. 

307. W. A. Simpson, February salary 65. 

308. Mrs. Crow, February salary . 60. 

309. Nellie A. Regan, February salary 90. 

310. Carl C. Rice, February salary 160. 

311. E. M. Hulme, February salary 190. 

312. A. W. Smith, February salary 90. 

313. E. D. Kanaga, February salary 165. 

314. John Almquist, February salary 65. 

315. Standard Dray Co., hauling coal 104. 

316. J. G. Eldridge, February salary 175. 

317. Sadie Stockton, February salary 25. 

318. Belle Sweet, February salary 91. 

319. H. L. Axtell, February salary IgO. 

320. Permeal French, February salary 120. 

322. E. J. Carey, February salary 50. 

324. E. M. Hulme, balance salary for 1909-10 190. 

325. A. W. Smith, balance salary for 1909-10 90. 

326. E. D. Kanaga, balance salary for 1909-10 165. 

327. John S. Grogan, balance salary for 1909-10 130. 

328. H. L. Axtell, balance salary for 1909-10 180. 

329. Carl C. Rice, balance salary for 1909-10 160. 

330. May Caldwell, balance salary for 1909-10 30. 

331. Nellie A. Regan, balance salary for 1909-10 90 



00 
00 
.00 
.00 
.65 
00 
00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.35 
.00 
.35 
.00 
.00 
00 
.00 
.00 
.65 
.00 
.50 
.00 
.35 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.35 
.65 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.36 
.00 
.00 
.65 
.00 
.00 
.00 
,00 
.00 
•OO 
00 
00 
00 
00 
.00 



XXIV 



APPENDIX 



No 

332. 
333. 
334. 
335. 
336. 
337. 
338. 
339. 
340. 
341. 
342. 
343. 
344. 
345. 
346. 
349. 
350. 
351. 
352. 
353. 
354. 
355. 
356. 
358. 
359. 
360. 
361. 

362. 
363. 
364. 
367. 
368. 
369. 
370. 
371. 
372. 
373. 
374. 
375. 
376. 
377. 
378. 

379. 
380. 
381. 
382. 
383. 
384. 
385. 
387. 
388. 
389. 
390. 
391. 



392. 



Name and Service. Amount. 

Permeal French, balance salary for 1909-10 120.00 

Evan T. Sage, balance salary for 1909-10 120.00 

I. J. Cogswell, balance salary for 1909-10 120.00 

E. H. Collens, balance salary for 1909-10 50.00 

Francis Jenkins, June salary 108.35 

John Almquist, June salary 65.00 

W. A. Simpson, June salary 65.00 

Mrs. Crow, June salary 60.00 

Fred Skog, June salary 65.00 

Belle Geddes, June salary 50.00 

James A. MacLean, June salary 166.65 

Sadie Stockton, June salary 25.00 

J. G. Eldridge, June salary 175.00 

Noyes Ladd, teamster, June salary 45.00 

W. A. Zumhoff. June salary 83.35 

Mrs. Sage, Assistant Librarian, June salary 50.00 

W. A. Zumhoff, July salary 83.35 

Fred Skog, July salary 05.00 

W. A. Simpson, July salary 65.00 

Belle Geddes, July salary 50.00 

James A. MacLean, July salary 208.35 

Francis Jenkins, July salary 108.35 

J. G. Eldridge, July salary 175.00 

E. J. Carey, July salary 50.00 

W. A. Simpson, August salary 65.00 

Fred Skog, August salary 65.00 

Gertrude Stephenson, July salary, Stenographer Bursar's 

office 60.00 

J. G. Eldridge, August salary 175.00 

James A. MacLean, August salary 208.35 

Francis Jenkins, August salary 108.35 

Sydney C. Bates, Fireman, September salary 83.35 

Fred Skog, September salary 65.00 

C. W. Van der Veer, Physical Director, September salary. 120.00 

J. G. Griffith, Instructor in Athletics, September salary.. 160.00 

H. L. Axtell, September salary 190.00 

E. H. Collens, September salary 50.00 

W. A. Simpson, September salary 70.00 

Ruth Brewer, Assistant Librarian, September salary. . . . 50.00 

Nellie Regan, September salary 90.00 

Belle Geddes, August salary 50.00 

P. J. French, September salary 120.00 

Mabel E. Price, Stenographer Bursar's office, August 

and September salary 81.33 

John Almquist, September salary 65.00 

E. T. Sage, September salary '. 120.00 

James A. MacLean, September salary 208.35 

E. M. Hulme, September salary 200.00 

Francis Jenkins, September salary 108.35 

J. G. Eldridge, September .salary 183.35 

Belle Geddes, September salary 50.00 

I. J. Cogswell, September salary 120.00 

^^ C. Rice, September salary 170.00 

Margaretha von Gsten, September salary 50.00 

A. W. Smith, September salary 90.00. 

Jean R. Wold, Instructor Physical Education, September 

salary 100.00 

E. J. Carey, September salary 50.00 



APPENDIX 



XXV 



No. Name and Service. Amount. 

393. Belle Sweet, September salary 100.00 

394. Francis Jenkins, casli advanced for lumber and freight... 565.15 

395. Sydney C. Bates, October salary 83.35 

396. Francis Jenkins, October salary 108.35 

397. H, L. Axtell, October salary 190.00 

398. E. T. Sage, October salary 120.00 

399. Jean R. Wold, October salary 100.00 

400. Fred Skog, October salary 65.00 

401. G. L. Morning, October salary 50.00 

402. Ruth Brewer, October salary 50.00 

403. John Hansen, October salary 65.00 

404. E. H. Collens, October salary 50.00 

405. Belle Geddes, October salary 50.00 

406. Belle Sweet, October salary 100.00 

406. E. M. Hulme, October salary 200.00 

407. E. M. Hulme, October salary 200.00 

408. I. J. Cogswell, October salary 120.00 

409. C. W. Van der Veer, October salary 120.00 

410. J. G. Eldridge, October salary. 183.35 

411. Margaretha von Osten, October salary ; . 50.00 

412. J. G. Griffith, October salary 160.00 

413. E. J. Carey, October salary 50.00 

414. Permeal J. French, October salary 120.00 

415. A. W. Smith, October salary 90.00 

416. W. A. Simpson, October salary 70.00 

417. Mabel E. Price, October salary 45.00 

418. C. C. Rice, October salary 170.00 

419. Nellie Regan, October salary ' . . . 90.00 

420. Student Farmer, advertising 17.50 

421. DePere Tablet Co., supplies, Preparatory 72.75 

422. William A. Earl, Insurance, Gymnasium 70.00 

423. N. Williamson, supplies, Fair exhibits 31.04 

424. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for departmental labor 

and University exhibit 96.20 

425. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for freight, express, tele- 
grams and postage 111.92 

428. Fay Hostetter, Piano Assistant, October salary . 33.35 

429. John W. Graham Co., stationery 9.40 

430. David & Ely Co., supplies. Gymnasium 9.47 

431. C. M. Fassett Co., supplies, Chemistry 101.95 

432. R. Douglas Sons, Arbor Vitae seedlings 8.00 

433. G. W. Todd & Co., equipment, check protector 34.40 

434. Henry A. Dreer, plants and bulbs 2.75 

435. Rhodes Iron Works, supplies, heating plant 12.60 

436. Narragansett Machine Co., apparatus. Gymnasium 200.32 

437. Holley-Mason Hardware Co., supplies 4.17 

438. Naylor & Cummins, Insurance, Assay Bldg 37.50 

439. H. Melgard, Insurance, Gymnasium 70.00 

Grand total $33,225.47 

AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE FUND. 

1. W. S. Morley, June salary ' . . $ 180.00 

2. J^ S. DeLury, June salary 130.00 

3. Phillip Soulen, June salary 150.00 

4. C. N. Little, June salary 180.00 

5. Henrietta E. Moore, June salary 180.00 

6. J. M. Aldrich, June salary 180.00 



XXVI 



APPENDIX 



No. Name and Service. Amount. 

7. Carl Von Ende, June salary 180.00 

8. E. E. Elliott, June salary 41.65 

9. Clarke Woodward Drug Company, Dairy Supply 5.26 

10. A. C. Terril, June salary 200.00 

11. L. E. Gurney, June salary 180.00 

13. Berenice S. Maynard, June salary 100.00 

14. Bausch & Lomb Optical Company, apparatus, Civil Eng.. . 126.00 

15. Moscow Hardware Company, Dairy supplies ($1.00), equip- 
ment ($5.25) 6.25 

16. David & Ely Company, Domestic Science, supplies 40.67 

17. Swann & Coffin, Domestic Science, supplies 31.60 

18. W. S. Robbins, Domestic Science, supplies 1.60 

19. Fort Wayne Electric Works, Elec. Eng-., apparatus 18.61 

20. J. N. Friedman, harness 1.00 

21. J. L. Hills, Treas. Graduate School Agriculture 25.00 

22. The Mine & Smelter Supply Company, Physics, apparatus 26.00 

23. Weston Electrical Instrument Company, Elec. Eng., ap- 
paratus 59.50 

24. G. Weber, harness and robe 5.75 

25. General Electric Company, Elec. Eng., apparatus 62.50 

26. Butterfleld, Elder Implement Company, Agrl. equipment.. 31.36 

27. Cold Storage Market, Domestic Science, supplies... 24.25 

28. Idaho Student Farmer 2.50 

29. Seneca Falls Mfg. Company, Mech. Eng., tools 6.00 

30. Portland Seed Company, grass seed 16.25 

31. John Almquist, Gardener's salary for August 65.00 

32. Bausch & Lomb Optical Company, Civ. Eng., apparatus. .. 17.50 

33. A. W. Smith, August salary 75.00 

35. Fort Wayne Electric Works, Mech. Eng., apparatus 2.61 

36. General Electric Company, Elec. Eng., apparatus 25.00 

37. Keuffel & Esser Company, Civ. Eng., apparatus 24.60 

39. Carl C. Rice, September salary 160.00 

40. Moscow & Rural Telephone Company 9.25 

41. Ray E. Peebler, labor 23.64 

42. John W. Graham & Company, Chemistry supplies 3.75 

43. Butterfield, Elder Implement Company, spraying material 2.00 

44. Military Information Division U. S. Army, Military sup- 
plies 4.10 

45. Geo. R. Swayne, lantern slides 51.42 

46. Holley Mason Hardware Company, hinges 15.56 

47. Zinsser & Company, chemical supplies 10.36 

48. Central Scientific Company, chemical apparatus 17.41 

49. John C. Moore Company, chemical supplies 9.15 

50. Tablet & Ticket Company, Chemistry, supplies 3.75 

51. Westinghouse Elec. House & Mfg. Company, Elec. Eng., 
apparatus .70 

52. Spencer Lens Company, Biology, supplies 16.05 

53. Tinius Olsen & Company, Civ. Eng., apparatus 25.10 

54. The A. Lietz Company, Civ. Eng., apparatus 4.00 

55. Romain B. Hough, books. Forestry 45.00 

56. Star- Mirror, printing. Dairying and Forestry 40.53 

57. Central Scientific Company, Chemical apparatus 10.50 

58. Williamson, Domestic Art, supplies 7.13 

59. Henry Troenner, Civ. Eng., apparatus 7.20 

60. Kftuffol & Esser Company, Civ. .Eng., apparatus 1.06 

61. Eagle Lock Company, Civ. Eng., keys 3.79 

62. Eimer & Amend, Civ. Eng., apparatus 1.60 

63. P:ngineering News Publishing Company, Civ. Eng., book. . . 3.60 



APPENDIX XXVII 

No. Name and Service. Amount. 

64. The Yale & Townes Mfg. Company, Civ. Eng., loclcs and 

keys • 13.38 

65. Foote Mineral Company, Chemical supplies 5.10 

S6. Wm. Gaertner & Company, Chemical apparatus 5.99 

67. E. H. Sargent & Company, supplies, Chemical 196.46 

«8. Eugene Dietzgen Company, Civ. Eng., apparatus 77.98 

69. Chris Anderson, shafts 3.50 

70. Bausch & Lomb Optical Company, Geology, apparatus 7.33 

71. Spencer Lens Company, Biology, apparatus 167.40 

72. Scientific Material Company, Civ. Eng., apparatus 4.88 

73. Dennison Mfg. Company, Chemistry, supplies 4.18 

74. The Chemical Rubber Company, Chemistry, supplies 15.75 

75. Shaw, Borden & Company, Agriculture, printing 9.50 

76. C. Hennecke Company, Domestic Art, equipment 2.27 

77. J. T. Baker Chemical Company, Chem., supplies 1.48 

78. Moscow Electric Supply Company, Morrill Hall, lamps 12.75 

79. Keuffel & Esser Company, Civ. Eng., supplies 3.76 

80. Mrs. Damon, Domestic Art, equipment 1.50 

81. Union Iron Works, Mech. Eng., supplies 9.48 

82. Sylvia S. Smith, Domestic Art, apparatus 1.00 

83. E. H. Sargent & Company, Chemical supplies and ap- 
paratus 370.91 

84. Moscow Commission Company, oats 4.25 

85. The Williamson Furniture Company, linoleum 11.25 

86. Geo. Creighton Company, Military, supplies 4.60 

87. C. M. Fassett Company, Chem. supplies 2.30 

88. J. J. Carr, Domestic Art, equipment 5.50 

89. Otto Silica Company, Civ. Eng., supplies 2.10 

90. The Holtzer Cabot Electric Company, Elec. Eng., supplies 2.50 

91. Braun-Knecht Company, Chemical supplies 23.61 

92. Standard Oil Company, Chem. Supplies 64.95 

93. Keuffel & Esser Company, Civ. Eng., apparatus 20.15 

94. A. T. Thompson & Company, Forestry, apparatus 461.58 

95. David & Ely Company, Domestic Science, supplies 44.46 

96. A. L. Vroman, Morrill Hall, plumbing ($88.10), General 

($3.80) 91.90 

97. Bausch & Lomb Optical Company, Biology, supplies 91.90 

98. Washington Mill Company, Mech. Eng., supplies 11.25 

99. N. Williamson, Forestry, supplies 5.25 

100. H. Channon Company, Mech. Eng., tools 62.23 

101. W. A. Lauder, Civ. Eng., supplies 4.00 

102. Idaho- Wash. L. & P. Company, equipment, Biology 12.00 

103. O. R. & N. Co., coal 260.55 

104. Spokane & Inland R. R. Co., freight on coal 146.76 

105. The Engineering Record, printing .77 

106. Madison Lumber Company, coal 150.85 

107. W. N. Day, coal 100.00 

108. The Denver Fire Clay Company, Agronomy, supplies 120.80 

109. The Denver Fire Clay Company, Geology, supplies 14.80 

110. Potlatch Lumber Company, coal 756.30 

111. The Dorr Mitchell Electric Company, Forestry, equipment 1.60 

112. Potlatch Lumber Company, Forestry, supplies 3.35 

113. Moscow Steam Laundry, Domestic Science, laundry 14.60 

114. Francis Jenkins, freight, Agrl 5.90 

115. Moscow Packing Company, Horticulture, storage 2.95 

116. Moscow Packing Company, Horticulture, supplies 7.05 

117. J. L. Hills, Graduate School of Agriculture 25.00 

118. Collins & Orland, equipment, Mining ($3.45), Dom. Sc. 



XXVIII APPENDIX 

No. Name and Service. Amount. 

($4.40), Mech. Eng-., ($1.70), Chem. ($3.15), Geolo&y ($1.25), 
Physics ($1.15), Mining ($15.40), Forestry ($12.51), Gen- 
eral ($90.24) 133.25 

119. Braun-Kneclit Company, Cliemical supplies 103.13 

120. E. E. Blingerland, Biology, equipment 36.25 

121. Central Scientific Company, Forestry, apparatus and sup- 
plies , 42.99 

122. Bauscli & Lomb Optical Company, Biology, apparatus.... 13.06 

123. Eugene Dietzgen Company, Civ. Eng., supplies 1.91 

124. David & Ely Company, supplies, Chem. ($6.00), Forestry 
($10.42), General ($7.95) 24.37 

125. A. T. Thompson & Company, Forestry, apparatus 40.00 

126. The Kny Scheerer, Biology, equipment 96.00 

127. The Kny Scheerer, Biology, tools 15.20 

128. The Tablet & Ticket Company, supplies, Chem. ($2.13), 

Geol. ($9.55) 11.68 

129. N. Williamson, supplies, Dom. Art ($2.22), Gen. ($2.40)... 4.62 

130. Hazelwood Company, Dairy supplies 9.00 

131. John W. Graham & Company, Agricultural, equipment. . . . 1.00 

132. Francis Jenkins, freight. Forestry ($18.49), Biology $8.39), 
Chemistry ($2.57), Geology ($2.08), Mech. Eng. ($2.57), 
Vet. ($29.12), Dairy ($4.32), General ($7.30), postage and 
telegrams ($23.06) 97.90 

133. H. Channon & Company, Mech. Eng., tools 1.63 

134. Nils Peterson, Civ. Eng., apparatus 8.80 

135. The Kny-Scheerer Company, Biology, equipment 2.50 

136. Eimer & Amend, Geology, apparatus and supplies 71.53 

137. N. Williamson, Dom. Art, supplies 4.97 

138. Moscow Electric Supply Company, supplies, Forestry 
($7.15), Physics ($3.60), General ($51.50) 62.25 

139. Francis Jenkins, freight, Forestry ($7.22), Biology ($3.45), 
Elec. Eng. ($2.06), Military ($1.70), Geology ($14.22), Gen- 
eral ($10.49), postage and telegrams ($20.32) 59.46 

140. Empire Hardware Company, supplies, Mech. Eng. ($69.45), 
General ($5.00) 74.45 

142. Moscow & Rural Telephone Company, telephone rental... 12.55 

143. Francis Jenkins, Dairy, equipment 8.60 

144. Tablet & Ticket Company, Chemistry, supplies 1.55 

145. Geo. Creighton Company, Dom. Art, supplies 1.50 

146. The Inland Market, Horticulture, supplies .35 

147. The Denver Fire Clay Company, Geology, apparatus 197.10 

148. A. O. Magnuson, Dairy, equipment 10.15 

149. J. J. Sterner, Horticulture, equipment 3.75 

150. O. G. Vroman, plumbing, Dormitory ($2.90), Civ. Eng. 
($6.95), Chemistry ($34.65), Chem. (..6.65), General ($7.00) 58.15 

151. O. G. Vroman, plumbing, Veterinary 4.05 

152. Eastman- James Company, Agriculture, furniture 43.65 

153. Spencer Lens Company, Forestry, apparatus 81.00 

1.04. W. A. Lauder, General, cement 21.30 

155. Oshko.sk Logging Tool Company, Forestry, apparatus 4.71 

156. [Oiripire Hardware Company, Agriculture, supplies .80 

157. Holley-Ma.son Hardware Company, Mech. Eng., equipment 18.80 

158. Clarke. Woodward Drug Company, Dairy, supplies 5.30 

159. General Electric Company, Physics, apparatus 147.75 

160. Fdaho-Wash. L. & P. Co., Agriculture, light and power 13.20 

161. Idaho-Wash. L. & P. Co., General, light and power 20.43 

162. Yawman & Erbe Mfg. Company, Agriculture, furniture... 5.78 

163. The Chas. A. Strelenger Company, Mech. Eng., equipment 5.00 



APPENDIX 



XXIX 



No 

164. 
165. 
166. 
167. 
168. 
169. 
170. 
171. 
172. 
173. 
174. 
175. 
176. 
177. 
178. 
179. 
180. 
181. 
182. 
183. 
184. 
185. 
186. 
187. 
188. 
189. 
190. 
191. 
192. 



193. 
194. 



195. 
196. 



197. 
198. 
199. 
200. 
201. 
202. 
203. 



204. 
205. 
206. 
207. 
208. 
209. 
210. 
211. 
212. 



Name and Service. Amount. 

John W. Graham Company, Military supplies .92 

Cambridge Botanical Supply Co., Biology, supplies 36.25 

W. A. Lauder, Horticulture, equipment 3.40 

The Star-Mirror, Veterinary, printing 132.00 

De Laval Dairy Supply Company, Dairy, apparatus 2.90 

General Electric Company, Physics, apparatus 58.29 

Potlatch Lumber Company, Horticulture, equipment 12.85 

Universal Register Company, General, strip cards 3.00 

Bausch & Lomb Optical Company, Bacteriology, supplies 3.68 

Forbes Dry Plate Company, Horticulture, equipment 4.40 

The Denver Fire Clay Company, Geology, apparatus 48.80 

The C. M. Fassett Company, Mining, supplies 8.75 

John W. Graham Company, Horticulture, apparatus 1.40 

Central Scientific Company, Forestry, apparatus 13.79 

Francis Jenkins, supplies, General 124.37 

Francis Jenkins, Janitor labor 136.90 

Moscow & Rural Telephone Company, telephone rental... 12.25 

D. Hill, Forestry, seeds 5.53 

C. J. Lundstrom Mfg. Company, Forestry, furniture 35.82 

Union Iron Works, Mech. Eng., supplies 9.52 

Standard Oil Company, Agriculture, supplies 64.65 

J. N. Friedman, Agriculture, equipment 8.90 

Potlatch Lumber Company, Agriculture, equipment 43.20 

Grote-Rankin Company, Agriculture, furniture 77.00 

Potlatch Lumber Company, Mining, equipment. 4.85 

N. Williamson, supplies, Dom. Art ($2.09), General ($55.35) 57.44 

C. M. Fassett Company, Mining, supplies .75 

Spokane Seed Company, General, grass seeds 16.88 

R. Hodgins, supplies, Agr. Farm ($12.40), Horticulture 
($36.20), Physics ($2.45), Dairy ($1.90), Agronomy ($4.20), 

Geologj^ ($3.00), Mining ($8.00), General ($16.10) 84.25 

Baker & Company, Chemistry, apparatus .92 

Francis Jenkins, freight. Horticulture ($14.06), Agriculture 
($17.07), Bacteriology ($5.25), Agr. Chem. ($34.02), Dairy 
($26.52), Agron. ($2.30), Forestry ($4.85), Military ($.30), 

General ($4.85) 109.22 

Francis Jenkins, sundry Departmental labor 87.52 

Francis Jenkins, freight. Dairy ($8.60), Agr. ($9.13), 
Agron. ($6.01), Horticulture ($2.06), Agr. Chem. ($37.67), 

Forestry ($58.70) 122.17 

Francis Jenkins, sundry Agri. labor 218.48 

R. S. McCaffery, traveling expenses 36.30 

Francis Jenkins, General and Departmental sundry labor 131.85 

Wm. Lefler, Dairy, equipment 2.40 

E. H. Sargent & Co., Agr. Chem., supplies 238.86 

Tinius Olson & Company, Civ. Eng., apparatus 22.00 

Electric Appliance Company, Elec. ($2.67), Mech. Eng. 
($1.48), Physics (($72.50), General ($42.45), equipment 

and supplies 119.10 

Engineering-Contracting, Civ. Eng., library 2.00 

Underwood Typewriter Company, Agr., equipment 56.50 

General Electric Company, Physics, apparatus 25.00 

Bausch & Lomb Optical Company, Biology, apparatus... 6.00 

Moscow Electric Supply Company, Agr., equipment 25.80 

Yawman & Erbe Mfg. Company, Agr., furniture 19.25 

Idaho- Wash. L. & P. Co., Agriculture, light and power... 29.64 

P'airbanks, Morse & Company, Civ. Eng. apparatus 30.00 

E. H. Sargent & Company, Chemistry, supplies and appa- 



XXX 



APPENDIX 



No. Name and Service. Amount. 

ratus 92.94 

213. Folmer & Schwing Div. Eastman Kodak Co., Dairy, equip- 
ment .29 

214. Chas. H. Pennypacker, Geology, equipment 177.00 

215. Ward's Natural Sci. Establishment, Veterinary, apparatus 287.10 

216. Biltmore Nursery, Forestry, trees 57.23 

217. D. Hill, Forestry, seeds 13.73 

218. E. H. Sargent & Company, Chemistry, apparatus... 24.30 

219. Ward's Natural Sci. Establishment, Veterinary, apparatus 371.00 

220. Braun-Knecht Heimann Company, Chemistry, supplies... 42.12 

221. Joseph L. Hills, Sec. Treas., Membership Ass'n., Amr. 

Agrl. Colleges 15.00 

222. J. J. Carr, Biology, furniture 20.00 

223. General Electric Company, Physics, apparatus 147.50 

224. Hallidie Company, Mech. Eng., apparatus and tools 867.20 

225. Francis Jenkins, June salary 41.65 

226. Mamie Bonebrake, June salary 50.00 

227. W. L. Carlyle, June salary 291.65 

228. Etta McGuire, June salary 20.00 

229. J. S. Jones, June salary 74.55 

230. Standard Dray Company, Departmental draying 11.75 

231. W. H. Wicks, traveling expenses 8.50 

232. Francis Jenkins, Departmental sundry labor 229.35 

233. Moscow & Rural Telephone Co., telephone rental 12.55 

234. L. F. Childers, Agronomy, June salary 34.30 

235. H. P. Fishburn, Agricultural Chemistry, June salary 50.00 

236. Pren Moore, Farm Foreman, June salary 75.00 

237. G. E. Frevert, Dairying, June salary 25.00 

238. J. H. Frandson, Dairying, June salary 25.00 

239. C. W. Colver, Agricultural Chemistry, June salary 50.00 

240. R. Hodgins, Forestry ($186.95), General ($37.35) 224.30 

241. W. S. Robbins, Domestic Science, supplies 2.50 

242. Ohio Valley Forest Nurseries, seeds 3.80 

243. Geo. Creigliton Co., Domestic Art, supplies .32 

244. Central Market, Domestic Science, supplies 20.15 

245. D. D. Hill, Forestry, seedlings 113.83 

246. The AVagoner Glass Works, Dairy, apparatus 50.00 

247. The Divine Water Motor Co., Physics, apparatus 59.38 

248. David & Ely Co., supplies. Forestry ($.65), Military 

($4.25) , Domestic ($11.64) 16.54 

249. Cambridge Botanical Supply Co., supplies. Biology 4.50 

250. C. C. Swann, supplies, Domestic Science 76.26 

251. N. Williamson, supplies. Domestic Art 3.04 

252. E. E. Dent, three Shire horses, Agriculture 950,00 

253. Collins & Orland, Departmental supplies 41.40 

254. W. H. Lucas, Janitor, Morrill Hall, July salary 25.00 

255. Pren Moore, Farm Foreman, July salary 37.50 

256. John Almquist, Gardener, July salary 65.00 

257. E. N. Humphrey, Teamster, July salary. 40.00 

258. The Groto-Rankin Co., furniture. Horticulture 32.35 

259. The Mills-Teepell Co., apparatus, Bacteriology 2.07 

260. The Star-Mirror, Departmental printing 50.30 

261. Francis Jenkins, advanced for labor 282.25 

262. Francis Jenkins, freight and express 91.47 

263. Francis Jenkins, advanced for janitor labor 130.05 

264. Francis Jenkins, postage 16.46 

265. Francis Jf-nkins, labor, Agriculture 207.60 

266. Francis J«-ukiiis, freight, express and telegrams 27.15 



APPENDIX 



XXXI 



No. Name and Service. * Amount. 

267. F. W. Chamberlain, Veterinary Science, salary 133.35 

268. F. W. Chamberlain, Veterinary Science, balance of salary 
1909-10 266.50 

269. Idaho- Wash. L. &. P. Co., light and power 13.49 

270. Engineering Record, C. E. Adv 1.44 

271. Oliver Machinery Co., apparatus. Civil Eng 12.36 

272. Madison Lumber & Mill Co., lumber 4.65 

273. J. L. Bourn, supplies. Domestic Science 1.50 

274. Portland Seed Co., fertilizer 5.75 

275. John F. Nicholson, traveling expenses 12.40 

276. W. H. Wicks, traveling expenses 25.65 

277. Etta McGuire, Station Librarian, July and August salary 20.00 

278. Margaret Livernash, Station Stenographer, August salary 25.00 
79. W. H. Lawes, Janitor, Morrill Hall, August salary 25.00 

280. Roy Stillinger, Teamster, August salary 45.00 

281. Pren Moore, Farm Foreman, August salary 37.50 

282. John Almquist, Gardener, August salary 65.00 

283. Engineering News, C. E. Adv • 2.94 

284. Moscow Steam Laundry, Domestic Science 20.25 

285. Potlatch Lumber Co., lumber. Agriculture 66.95 

286. Collins & Orland Hardware Co., Forestry, equipment 
($21.85), Departmental supplies ($8.75) 30.60 

287. A. H. Averill Machinery Co., casting, Agriculture 3.60 

288. Keuffel & Esser Co., apparatus, Forestry 45.30 

289. McGowan Bros. Hardware Co., machinery, Agriculture... 9.60 

291. N. Williamson, supplies, Agriculture 3.90 

292. Delaval Dairy Supply Co., apparatus, Dairy 42.92 

293. International Harvester Co., equipment, Agriculture 10.75 

294. Grote-Rankin Co., furniture. Agriculture 32.25 

295. R. F. Hildebrand, equipment. Dairy 19.20 

296. Star-Mirror, printing. Mining and Agriculture 6.70 

297. J. N. Friedman, supplies, Agriculture 4.80 

298. Iszard Warren Co., apparatus, C. E 157.50 

299. William Goodbody, envelopes 33.40 

300. Star-Mirror, printing. Agriculture 7.90 

301. Potlatch Lumber Co., lumber. Forestry ($17.05), Agr. 
($10.10), C. E. ($1.75), General ($6.50) 35.40 

302. Francis Jenknis, freight, Agriculture 69.86 

303. Francis Jenkins, advanced for labor, Agriculture 107.60 

305. Potlatch Lumber Co., lumber. Agriculture 5.40 

306. Moscow Hardware Co., Departmental equipment 9.05 

307. John Deere Plow Co., machinery. Agriculture 5.82 

308. Butterfield, Elder Implement Co., supplies. Agriculture... 21.65 

309. Pacific Coast Elevator Co., supplies, Agriculture 15.12 

310. Moscow Hardware Co., supplies .40 

311. Moscow Hardware Co., supplies. Forestry 4.50 

312. Moscow Hardware Co., equipment 22.65 

313. Francis Jenkins, advanced for labor. Agriculture 206.48 

314. Francis Jenkins, freight and express 72.92 

315. Margaret Livernash, Station Stenographer, Sept. salary.. 25.00 

316. Pren Moore, Farm Foreman, Sept. salary 37.50 

317. C. R. Stillinger, Teamster, Sept. salary 45.00 

318. W. H. Lawes, Janitor, Sept. salary 25.00 

319. W. and L. E. Gurley, apparatus. Forestry 225.00 

320. E. Garron, Live Stock attendant, Sept. salary 50.00 

321. Star-Mirror, printing. Horticulture 24.90 

322. Moscow & Rural Telephone Co., telephone. Agriculture... 5.60 

323. John Peasley, threshing 74.75 



XXXII APPENDIX 

No. Name and Service. Amount. 

324. Ottawa Silica Co., supplies, Civ. Eng 6.30 

325. Ctiemical Rubber Co., supplies, Chemistry 16.14 

326. J. J. Carr, equipment, Bacteriology 194.00 

327. W. L. Carlyle, tools, Agriculture 3.50 

328. C. M. Fassett, supplies, Mining 10.50 

329. Collins & Orland, Departmental equipment 49.65 

330. Lewiston Tribune, printing, Agriculture 48.80 

331. C. F. Albright, equipment, Agriculture 2.50 

332. Standard Lumber Co., lumber 92.80 

333. Baker & Co., apparatus, Mining 35.12 

334. Moscow Hardware Co., equipment, Horticulture 4.20 

335. Braun-Knecht Co., apparatus, Chemistry 102.82 

336. Collins & Orland, supplies. Agriculture 12.25 

337. Potlatch Lumber Co., lumber 7.30 

338. Moscow Flour Mills, feed, Agriculture 250.66 

339. Standard Oil Co., supplies, Chemistry 65.25 

340. Crane Co., equipment, Bacteriology 3.17 

341. C. M. Fassett, supplies, Chemistry 10.10 

342. J. J. Carr, Departmental equipment 94.00 

343. Delaval Dairy Supply Co., apparatus, Agriculture 2.00 

344. Ford Grain Co., barley, Agriculture 122.10 

345. Moscow Hardware Co., supplies. Agriculture 19.54 

346. Francis Jenkins, advanced for labor 189.17 

347. Francis Jenkins, advanced for labor, Bacteriology ($69.30), 
Exhibit ($30.00), Domestic Art ($10.75) 110.05 

348. L. F. Childers, traveling expenses 26.50 

349. Francis Jenkins, advanced for labor, Agriculture 46.10 

350. Francis Jenkins, advanced for labor. Agriculture 147.52 

351. Francis Jenkins, freight, Mech. Eng 5.39 

352. Francis Jenkins, advanced for plumbing. Chemistry 50.50 

353. Veatch Realty Co., Insurance, Morrill Hall 28.00 

354. F. E. Cornwall, Insurance, Morrill Hall 35.00 

355. H. S. Knowles, Insurance, Morrill Hall 35.00 

356. W. A. Earl, Insurance, Morrill Hall 35.00 

357. H. J. Rossi, Insurance, Morrill Hall 66.50 

358. C. & M. E. Lewis Co., Insurance, Morrill Hall 70.00 

359. O. M. Harvery, Insurance, Morrill Hall 14.00 

360. Geo. M. Reed, Insurance, Morrill Hall 70.00 

361. O. M. Osborne, Oct. salary 41.65 

362. W. L. Carlyle, Oct. salary 83.35 

363. Gustave Kroeger, Oct. salary 45.00 

364. A. E. Chace, Oct. salary 33.35 

365. Jennie L. K. Haner, Oct. salary 130.00 

366. Geo. Hall, Oct. salary 30.00 

367. E. E. Elliott, Oct. salary. . 250.00 

368. E. E. Hawley, Oct. salary 35.00 

369. Gustave Kroeger, Sept. salary 45.00 

370. C. J. ChafHns, Oct. .salary 35.00 

371. H. A. Wadsvvorth, Oct. salary 35.00 

372. Ph. Soulen, Oct. salary 180.00 

383. E. L. Black, Librarian and Stenographer, Agricultural 

Dept., one-half Sept. and Oct. .salary 37.50 

374. W. H. Wick.s, Oct. .salary 58.35 

375. J. F. Nicholson, Oct, salary 41.65 

376. Jas. W. P.irrell, display cards, University exhibit 15.00 

377. Scott Sign Co., sign frames, University exhibit 16.50 

378. J. J. Stf-rner, photographs, University exhibit 68.75 

379. Empire Hardware Co., supplies, paint, Farm 4,80 



APPENDIX 



XXXIII 



No. Name and Service. Amount. 

380. O. E. Bell, supplies for mower, Farm 6.65 

381. David Lumsden, equipment and supplies, Horticulture.... 45.50 

382. E. H. Sarg-ent & Co., apparatus and supplies, Bacteriology 229.18 

383. J. N. Friedman, supplies, harness 10.60 

384. E. H. Sargent & Co., supplies, Veterinary 55.84 

385. Crane & Co., supplies, Ag^r Chem. ($42.59), Mining ($4.71) 47.30 

386. J. J. Carr & Co., case and frames, University exhibit 9.80 

387. Wilson-Maeulen Co., supplies, Mining- 3.00 

388. Sharp & Smith, apparatus. Veterinary 6.28 

389. Palace Department Store, supplies, University exhibit.... 15.45 

390. Chris Anderson, blacksmithing. Farm 11.25 

391. Corliss McElroy, supplies, Agr. Chem 3.40 

392. Madison Lumber Co., lumber and apple boxes. Horticul- 
ture 37.45 

393. Denver Fire Clay Co., supplies. Veterinary 38.00 

394. Pren Moore, traveling expenses. University exhibit 38.50 

385. Crane & Co., supplies, Agr. Chem. ($42.59), Mining ($4.71) 47.30 

396. Jno. F. Nicholson, traveling expenses. University exhibit 44.35 

397. C. H. Shattuck, traveling expenses, University exhibit. . 4.00 

398. O. M. Osborne, traveling expenses, University exhibit 57.60 

399. C. C. Vincent, traveling expenses. University exhibit 5.55 

400. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for freight and express. . . 32.82 

401. E. J. Iddings, traveling expenses, University exhibit 116.00 

402. W. H. Wicks, traveling expenses. University exhibit 9.80 

403. C. J. Chaffins, traveling expenses. University exhibit 121.87 

404. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for plumbing 29,00 

405. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for freight and express. . . 80.22 

406. C. H. Shattuck, traveling expenses, University exhibit.... 20.35 

407. Ph. Soulen, traveling expenses, University exhibit 28.00 

408. J. H. Frandson, traveling expenses, University exhibit.... 9.95 

409. Canyon Abstract & Trust Co., Insurance, Morrill Hall 35.00 

410. C. R. Stillinger, Oct. salary 50.00 

411. Pren Moore, Oct. salary 37.50 

412. E. J. Iddings, Oct. salary 75.00 

413. Horace Holaday, Oct. salary 70.00 

414. L. E. Gurney, Oct. salary 200.00 

415. S. E. Hutton, Oct. salary , 200.00 

416. B. S. Maynard, Oct. salary 120.00 

417. W. H. Laws, Oct. salary 25.00 

418. L. F. Childers, Oct. salary 58.35 

419. H. E. Moore, Oct. salary 200.00 

420. C. H. Shattuck, Oct. salary 200.00 

421. F. W. Chamberlain, Oct. salary 170.00 

422. C. L. von Ende, Oct. salary 190.00 

423. C. C. Vincent, Oct. salary 25.00 

424. Margaret Livernash, Oct. salary 25.00 

425. E. Garron, Oct. salary 50.00 

426. H. P. Fishburn, Oct. salary 33.35 

427. G. L. Larson, Oct. salary 150.00 

428. D. B. Steinman, Oct. salary 120.00 

429. C. N. Little, Oct. salary 200.00 

430. C. C. Tull, Oct. salary 150.00 

431. R. S. McCaffery, Oct. salary 275.00 

432. J. M. Aldrich, Oct. salary 200.00 

433. W. S. Morley, Oct. salary 200.00 

434. J. S. DeLury, Oct. salary 150.00 

435. W. R. Chedsey, Oct. salary 180.00 

436. R. C. Shuey, Oct. salary 90.00 



XXXIV 



APPENDIX 



No. Name and Service. Amount. 

437. Sylvia Smith, Oct. salary 110.00 

438. R. W. Brinl^, Oct. salary 110.00 

439. J. S. Jones, Oct. salary 41.65 

440. J. H. Frandson, Oct. salary. , 83.35 

441. C. W. Colver, Oct. salary 25.00 

442. John Almquist, Oct. salary 65.00 

443. Idaho Post, printing and bulletins 102.25 

444. Western Union Tel. Co., telegrams 3.64 

445. Douglass Show Cards, cards for University exhibit 4.75 

446. Collins & Orland, supplies 28.85 

Total $26,597.87 

REGENTS' EXPENSE FUND. 

2921. E. H. Moffltt, traveling expense $ 71.00 

2922. M. E. Lewis, traveling expense 83.20 

3324. Mrs. S. H. Hays, traveling expense 68.61 

3618. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for hotel and cab 24.75 

3619. O. E. McCutcheon, traveling expense 63.31 

3620. O. E. McCutcheon, traveling expense 33.76 

4791. O. E. McCutcheon, traveling expense 59.80 

5223. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for hotel 31.45 

5503. Mrs. S. H. Hays, traveling expense 49.95 

6354. O. E. McCutcheon, traveling expense 39.75 

7909. Mrs. S. H. Hays, traveling expense 43.70 

7910. O. E. McCutcheon, traveling expense 68.24 

8415. Star-Mirror, stationery 9.00 

8416. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for hotel and cab 13.25 

8417. E. H. Moffltt, traveling expenses 62.40 

9025. Moscow Auto Co., livery 4.00 

10220. M. E. Lewis, traveling expense 91.25 

11532. M. E. Lewis, traveling expense 47.70 

11777. Mrs. S. H. Hays, traveling expense 51.14 

11178. O. E. McCutcheon, traveling expense 74.20 

12167. O. E. McCutcheon, traveling expense 36.70 

12622. O. E. McCutcheon, traveling expense ". 66.15 

12835. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for Commencement 9.90 

14235. Mrs. S. H. Hays, traveling expense 51.45 

14236. E. H. Moffltt, traveling expense 44.10 

Total $1,198.76 

FURNITURE AND FIXTURES FOR LIBRARY FUND. 

8418. Zuinhof & Collins, rods $ 3.00 

8419. Mo.scow Hardware Co., bolts .66 

8420. Moscow Hardware Co., bolts 3.50 

8421. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for carpenter labor 118.90 

8699. Standard Dray Co., cartage 5.00 

9026. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for carpenter labor 27.00 

9027. Williamson Furniture Co., linoleum 304.40 

9718. J'Yancis .Jenkins, cash advanced for express .50 

9719. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for freight 4.21 

9720. Library Bureau, chairs, stacks and tables 2,984.23 

10418. Philip Soulen, traveling expense 1.60 

Total $3,453.00 



APPENDIX 



XXXV 



FURNITURE FOR ADMINISTRATION BUILDING FUND. 

No. Name and Service. Amount. 

6814. Standard Dray Co., cartage $ .75 

6815. Grote-Rankin Co., desks and chairs 370.41 

6816. John W. Graham & Co., 6 doz. chairs 77.50 

7724. McGilvery & Seeley, 14 doz. Duplex shades 141.05 

7725. Grote-Rankin Co., 4 office tables 67.75 

7726. Williamson Furniture Co., filing cases and sectional 

book cases 211.43 

7727. P. H. Soulen, traveling expenses 6.20 

7728. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for labor and carpenter 79.90 

7729. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for freight and cartage. . .85 

7730. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for carpenter and paint- 
ing 55.00 

7911. C. J. Lunstrom Mfg. Co., card index and letter files 44.95 

8700. J. J. Carr, filing cabinet 20.00 

8701. Standard Dray Co., cartage 17.00 

8702. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for freight 9.83 

9028. Moscow Hardware Co., towel bars 7.75 

9029. Williamson Furniture Co., card index 15.60 

9030. Standard Dray Co., cartage .50 

9350. J. J. Carr, Transit case. Civ. Eng 12.00 

9351. Grote-Rankin Co., 4 desks 113.50 

9721. Northwest School Furniture Co., 300 tablet arm chairs 

and 2 office tables 1,223.02 

9722. Library Bureau, 2 library tables 96.00 

10221. Williamson Furniture Co., linoleum 10.25 

10419. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced Lundstrom Mfg. Co 3.45 

11533. Northwest School Furniture Co., 1 table, 1 chair 12.75 

12168. Grote-Rankin Co., 2 desks 60.00 

12169. Williamson Furniture Co., sectional book cases 55.35 

13349. C. J. Lundstrom Mfg. Co., sectional book cases, files, 
guides, record cards, etc 58.09 

13350. Bursar, multigraph, stand and stool 243.50 

13524. Remington Typewriter Co., typewriter, desks and chairs 122.90 

13525. J. J. Carr & Co., counter and gate 90.00 

13526. Yawman & Erbe, roller copier 34.50 

13527. G. R. Andrews, oak stand 7.50 

13528. Bursar, express . 3.85 

14147. Tull & Gibbs, furniture 234.45 

14148. Tull & Gibbs, desks and rug 65.00 

14149. Bursar, freight on furniture ' 4.70 

Total $3,577.33 

BOOKS LIBRARY FUND. 

6126. Callaghan & Co., book. Law $ 1.80 

6127. Callaghan & Co., books. Law 124.20 

6356. G. E. Stechert & Co., books, History 6.88 

6358. Lawyers Co-operative Pub. Co., books, Law 64.00 

6361. G. E. Stechert & Co., books 61.28 

6817. American Law Book Co., book. Law 3.75 

6818. Lawyers Co-operative Pub. Co., book. Law 2.50 

6819. Boston Book Store, magazines 1.08 

6820. A. C. McClurg & Co., books 106.07 

7731. John W. Graham & Co., books, Law 14.50 

7732. Callaghan & Co., books, Law 21.00 



XXXVI 



APPENDIX 



No. Name and Service. Amount. 

7733. John W. Graham & Co., books, Law 2.50 

10222. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for books and freight... 28.57 

13351. A. N. Marquis & Co., books 4.50 

13352. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for freight on books.... 5.28 
13943. Bursar, books 6.00 

14150. Bursar, freight on books 39.61 

14151. A. C. McClurg & Co., books 3.39 

14237. Chas. Scribner's Sons, books 51.75 

14238. A. C. McClurg & Co., books 782.76 

14239. G. E. Stechert & Co., books 4.00 

14240. G. E. Stechert & Co., books 158.88 

14241. G. E. Stechert & Co., books 62.13 

14242. G. E. Stechert & Co., books 72.49 

14243. G. E. Stechert & Co., books 61.90 

14244. G. E. Stechert & Co., books 18.99 

14245. McGraw-Hill Book Co., books 4.25 

14246. McGraw-Hill Book Co., books 16.65 

Total $1,730.71 

MAINTENANCE LAW SCHOOL FUND. 

6128. Syms-York Co., stationery $ 34.50 

7356. John F. MacLane, services for organizing Law School 

and salary to Oct. 1, 1910. 416.67 

7734. John F. MacLane, Oct. salary 250.00 

8017. John F. MacLane, Nov. salary 250.00 

8423. Lawyers Co-operative Pub. Co., books. Law 2.50 

8424. J. J. Carr, 1 table 14.00 

8425. The Star-Mirror, supplies, paper 22.40 

8426. John F. MacLane, Dec. salary 250.00 

8703. Bancroft-Whitney Co., books, Law 5.00 

8704. The American Law Book Co., book. Law 3.75 

9031. Lawyers Co-operative Pub. Co., books. Law 6.00 

9723. Little, Brown & Co., books, Law 4.05 

9724. West Publishing Co., book, Law 4.00 

9725. West Publishing Co., books. Law 8.00 

9726. Callaghan & Co., books. Law 14.00 

9727. Baker, Voorhis & Co., books. Law 7.00 

9842. John F. MacLane, Jan. salary 250.00 

9907. I^awyers Co-operative Pub. Co., books, Law 5.00 

9969. John F. MacLane, Feb. salary 250.00 

10223. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for express 1.00 

10224. West Publishing Co., books, Law 5.00 

10225. Little, Brown & Co., books, Law 23.40 

10226. American Law Book Co., books, Law 3.75 

10227. West Publishing Co., book. Law 4.00 

10420. Star-Mirror, supplies, blanks 15.75 

10421. Little, l^>r()wn & Co., book. Law 5.40 

10422. Callaghan & Co., books, Law 19.00 

1086S. American I>aw Book Co., books. Law 6.60 

10800. I.,awyers Co-operative Pub. Co., book. Law 2.50 

10870. Wost Publishing Co., books, Law 29.90 

10889. .lohh F. MacJ.,ane, March salary 250.00 

11158. H. T. Flood & Co., books. Law 18.00 

11159. Littlf, Thrown & Co., books, T.,aw 4.50 

11 160. I'Jdvvard "J'hoinpson Co., books. Law 7.50 

11271. John F. Macl.,ane, April salary 250.00 



APPENDIX 



XXXVII 



No. Name and Service. Amount. 

11534. R. Hodgins, supplies, paper 6.10 

11779. John F. MacLane, May salary 250.00 

11780. Little, Brown & Co., books. Law 44.10 

11781. Edward Thompson Co., books, Law 7.50 

11782. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for express .90 

11783. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for lectures 48.00 

12170. John F. MacLane, balance salary year 1909-10 250.00 

12171. Bancroft- Whitney Co., books. Law 7.50 

12172. Baker, Voorhis & Co., books. Law 12.00 

12173. Little, Brown & Co., books. Law 6.25 

12174. The Bobbs-Merrill Co., books. Law 6.00 

12175. Lawyers Co-operative Pub. Co., book, Law 2.50 

12176. Boston Book Co., books. Law 8.58 

12361. Edward Thompson Co., book, Law 3.75 

12362. Bancroft-Whitney Co., book. Law 6.00 

12623. Banks Law Publishing- Co., book. Law 5.00 

12836. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for labor 33.55 

12837. West Publishing Co., books. Law. 33.00 

13108. Pacific Monthly, Adv 8.15 

13109. West Publishing Co., Adv 9.00 

13353. Lawyers Co-operative Pub. Co., books. Law 2.50 

13354. American Law Book Co., books. Law 3.75 

13355. Edward Thompson Co., books, Law 3.75 

13356. Pacific Monthly Adv 8.15 

13944. E. N. Durfee, salary 180.00 

13945. J. F. MacLane, salary 250.00 

13946. Remington Typewriter Co., two typewriters 100.00 

13947. David & Ely Co., furniture 7.00 

13948. Callaghan & Co., books 181.70 

13949. Illinois Book Exchange, books 1.50 

13950. Illinois Book Exchange, books 94.00 

13951. Lawyers Co-operative Publishing Co., books 2.50 

13952. American Law Book Co., books 3.75 

13953. Pacific Monthly, advertising 8.15 

14002. E. N. Durfee, salary 180.00 

14032. J. F. MacLane, salary 250.00 

14152. West Publishing Co., books 15.50 

14153. John C. Townes, books 13.50 

14154. Callaghan & Co., books 54.55 

14155. Lawyers Co-operative Publishing Co., books 2.50 

14156. Bancroft-Whitney Co., books 22.84 

14157. Keefe-Davidson Co., books 16.00 

Total $4,592.69 

LAW SCHOOL LIBRARY FUND. 

4342. Solon Orr, lew books $ 312.00 

5224. American Law Book Co., law books 122.25 

5226. W. H. Anderson Co., law books 18.00 

5227. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for freight 10.73 

5712. Lawyers Co-operative Pub. Co., law books 465.00 

6355. Bancroft-Whitney Co., law books 598.00 

6357. Boston Book Co., law books 95.00 

6359. Callaghan Co., law books 29.92 

6360. West Publishing Co., law books 348.00 

10871. West Publishing Co., law books 1.10 

Total $2,000.00 



XXXVIII 



APPENDIX 



LABORATORY EQUIPMENT FUND. 

No. Name and Service. Amount. 

2923. O. A. Benedict, carpenter labor $ 28.00 

4343. DeLaval Dairy Supply Co., apparatus, Dairy 26.70 

4344. A. L. Vroman, plumbing, Morrill Hall 34.50 

4345. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for freight, Dairy Dept. 9.76 

4792. O. A. Benedict, carpenter. Agronomy and Chemistry 82.00 

4793. E. H. Sargent & Co., Agronomy 162.29 

4794. Shelton Machinery Co., Dairy 61.65 

5225. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for labor 3.55 

7735. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for labor 64.00 

7736. M. W. Ebel, painting, Agriculture 4.00 

7737. C. H. Heard, labor, Agronomy 9.30 

7738. Empire Hardware Co., pans, Agronomy 3.00 

7739. A. L. Vroman, plumbing, Agriculture 37.61 

7740. Shelton Machinery Co., Dairy 26.15 

8427. J. J. Carr, table. Forestry 39.00 

8428. Shelton Machinery Co., Veterinary 4.75 

8429. Underwood Typewriter Co., stand, Agriculture 4.50 

8430. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for freight 3.20 

8431. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for carpenter and painter 64.80 

8705. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for carpenter and paint- 
er, Agriculture 108.20 

8706. Clyde Heard, drafting, Agriculture 4.00 

9032. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for carpenter and painter 183.70 
9352. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for carpenter and labor. . 51.65 
9728. Francis Jenkins, carpenter and labor, cash advanced 110.70 

9908. Eagle Lock Co., locks and keys. Dairy 30.50 

9909. A. L. Vroman, plumbing, Veterinary 32.85 

9910. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for freight .65 

9911. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for carpenter and painter 64.80 

10228. American Thermo-Ware Co., Veterinary 22.00 

10229. O. G. Vroman, plumbing. Dairy 109.86 

10423. Moscow Electric Supply Co., labor. Bacteriology 5.75 

10424. O. G. Vroman, plumbing. Agriculture 9.15 

10872. Troy Lumber & Manfg. Co., table, Agr. Chem 15.00 

10873. O. G. Vroman, Horticulture 6.12 

10874. O. G. Vroman, plumbing, Agr. Chem 19.30 

10875. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for labor and carpenter 209.60 
lli61. Hallam & Maguire, carpenter labor 8.40 

11535. Empire Hardware Co., bolts, Horticulture .72 

11536. Potlatch Lumber Co., lumber. Horticulture 2.35 

11538. Madison Lumber Co., lumber. Horticulture 3.25 

11539. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for freight .25 

12177. O. G. Vroman, plumbing, Horticulture 146.20 

12178. Collins & Orland, Horticulture 23.05 

12179. O. G. Vroman, plumbing, Agr 9.40 

12363. J. J. Anthony, pulley, Dairy 2.30 

13504. Moscow Hardware Co .40 

Total $1,848.91 

PURCHASE AND INSTALLING MINING MACHINERY. 

8707. Sauvour & Boylston, apparatus $ 133.00 

8708. The C. M. Fassett Co., supplies and apparatus 72.15 

8709. Elmer & Amend, apparatus and equipment 238.10 

9033. The C. M. Fassett Co., apparatus 10.25 



APPENDIX 



XXXIX 



No, Name and Service. Amount. 

9353. Eimer & Amend, supplies 26.55 

9729. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for freight 9.08 

9730. A. L. Vroman, plumbing- 39.62 

9731. Abbe Engineering Co., apparatus 30.00 

9912. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for labor 2.15 

9913. Moscow Hardware Co., supplies 4.00 

10230. Royal P. Jarvis, apparatus 80.76 

10231. O. G. Vroman, plumbing 14.80 

10232. Sauveur & Boylston, apparatus 45.00 

10233. J. J. Sterner, supplies 4.45 

10234. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for freight 25.75 

10235. R. S. McCaffery, traveling expenses 24.35 

10876. Standard Oil Co., supplies 3.95 

10877. O. G. Vroman, plumbing 9.20 

10878. Potlatch Lumber Co., lumber 9.35 

11540. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for freight 12.68 

11784. O. R. & N. Co., freight 45.71 

11785. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for freight and express.. 30.85 

12180. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for carpenter labor.... 54.00 

12181. Ernst Leitz, apparatus 14.30 

12182. Potlatch Lumber Co., lumber 73.80 

12183. Pacific Pipe and Tank Line, equipment 127.00 

12184. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for carpenter labor.... 54.00 

12364. Standard Dray Co., cartage 21.82 

12365. Allis-Chalmers Co., equipment 180.00 

12366. Rockwell Furnace Co., apparatus 920.00 

12367. Zumhof & Collins, supplies 12.00 

12368. Francis Jenkins, carpenter labor...... 52.00 

12624. Collins & Orland, supplies 36.10 

12838. N. P. Ry. Co., freight 332.52 

12839. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for labor 100.25 

12840. Idaho-Wash. L. & P. Co., freight on transformers 10.20 

12841. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for freight • 3.32 

12846. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for freight 66.77 

13110. Madison Lumber Co., lumber 4.00 

13111. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for labor 165.03 

13357. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for labor 148.65 

13358. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for labor 106.25 

13359. Potlatch Lumber Co., lumber 139.1)0 

13360. Collins & Orland, supplies 90.10 

13529. Potlatch Lumber Co., lumber 27.40 

13530. Moscow Hardware Co., hardware supplies 8.60 

13531. Moscow Hardware Co., hardware supplies 7,02 

13954. J. J. Anthony, machinery 58.21 

14247. Rhodes Iron Works, machinery and labor 134.24 

Total $3,819.23 

FARMERS' INSTITUTE AND AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION FUND. 

1641. J. R. Shinn, traveling expenses $ 90.00 

1642. H. T. French, traveling expenses 117.45 

1644. J. H. Frandson, traveling expenses 107.25 

1647. Elias Nelson, traveling expenses 55.85 

2496. R. E. Hyslop, traveling expenses 42.60 

2497. Berenice S. Maynard, traveling expenses 68.45 

2498. J. S. Jones, traveling expenses 63.10 

2499. Elias Nelson, traveling expenses 31.35 

2500. E. E. Elliott, traveling expenses 78 50 



XL 



APPENDIX 



No. Name and Service. Amount. 

2501. A. E. Gipson, traveling expenses 33.65 

2502. H. T. French, traveling expenses 73.15 

2503. J. H. Frandson, traveling expenses 69.85 

2924. David & Ely Co., supplies 3.00 

2925. The Star-Mirror, printing and circulars 61.75 

2926. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for express 2.95 

2927. H. F. Row, lectures and traveling expenses 37.50 

2928. M. W. Ebel, supplies 10.00 

2929. G. H. Maughan, traveling expenses 48.35 

2930. J. R. Shinn, traveling expenses 43.10 

3573. The Idaho Post, printing booklet 39.00 

3621. B. E. Elliott, traveling expenses 78.90 

4346. J. H. Frandson, traveling expenses 14.15 

4796. J. S. Jones, traveling expenses 5.15 

4797. E. E. Elliott, traveling expenses 21.80 

4798. Gooding Feed & Livery Co., livery 34.00 

4799. Weeter Lumber Co., lumber 44.77 

5228. E. E. Elliott, traveling expenses 71.75 

5713. R. E. Hyslop, traveling expenses 5.50 

8432. E. E. Elliott, traveling expenses 61.60 

8433. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for express 1.15 

8434. J. H. Frandson, traveling expenses 5.65 

8435. W. H. Wicks, traveling expenses 47.00 

8436. Star-Mirror, printing 4.30 

8710. Elias Nelson, traveling expenses 12.00 

8711. Edward L. Wells, traveling expenses 15.85 

8712. The Weiser Signal, printing 10.00 

9034. W. H. Wicks, traveling expenses 32.00 

9035. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for telegrams 1.55 

9036. J. H. Frandson, traveling expenses 29.05 

9037. E. E. Elliott, traveling expenses 30.45 

9038. The Star-Mirror, printing 7.23 

9354. Henry Smith, traveling expenses 29.20 

9355. Elias Nelson, traveling expenses 9.45 

9356. Coeur d'Alene Journal, printing 3.25 

9732. Caxton Printing Co., printing 6.00 

9733. E. E. Elliott, traveling expenses 111.15 

9734. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for supplies 4.25 

9735. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for supplies, charts 3.60 

9736. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for freight and express 7.25 

9837. C. H. Shattuck, traveling expenses 50.57 

9838. W. H. Wicks, traveling expenses 74.35 

9839. Edward L. Wells, traveling expenses 18.30 

9914. The Meridian Times, printing 10.70 

9915. Parma Herald, printing 7.50 

9916. G('org(! Tl. Barker. i)rinting 9.50 

9917. Caldwell News, printing 4.00 

9918. N. Williamson, supplies 7.84 

9919. American Engraving Co., engraving portraits 9.65 

9920. The Emmett Index, printing 4.25 

9921. N. Williamson, supplies 9.28 

9922. Nampa Leader-Herald, printing 5.00 

9923. Woodsen Jeffreys, hall rent 4.00 

9924. Coeur d'Alene Club, labor and postage 2.55 

9925. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for labor 3.40 

9926. E. E. Elliott, traveling expenses 13.30 

9927. W. C. Edmundson, traveling expenses 13.55 

9928. J. H. Frandson, traveling expenses 86.60 



APPENDIX 



XLI 



No. Name and Service. Amount, 

9929. F. W. Chamberlain, traveling expenses 25.40 

9930. Elias Nelson, traveling expenses 13.30 

10236. J. S, Bonham, traveling expenses 6.50 

10425. The Idaho Post, printing bulletins 32.00 

10426. T. J. Brown, printing 5.50 

10427. The Star-Mirror, printing and bulletins 32.65 

10428. E. E. Elliott, traveling expenses 127.75 

10429. J. Shirley Jones, traveling expenses 55.65 

10430. L. F. Childers, traveling expenses 83.50 

10431. J. H. Frandson, traveling expenses 89.70 

10879. Caldwell Electric Co., supplies 1.00 

10880. W. N. Yost, traveling expenses and services 41.90 

10881. E. E. Elliott, traveling expenses 94.45 

10882. B. S. Maynard, traveling expenses 110.25 

10883. Ray Lyman, labor 2.50 

11541. Gustave H. Kroeger, traveling expenses 85.80 

11786. Gooding Mercantile Co., cash advanced for time check. 30.00 

12185. G. H. Maughan, traveling expenses 12.40 

12186. W. L. Carlyle, traveling expenses 67.50 

12369. E. E. Elliott, traveling expenses 120.15 

12842. Times Printing & Publishing Co., printing 2.50 

13112. W. H. Wicks, traveling expenses 45.75 

13113. John F. Nicholson, traveling expenses 40.25 

13113. L. F. Childers, traveling expenses 53.50 

13361. David & Ely Co., supplies 2.50 

13362. David & Ely Co., supplies 3.73 

13363. Collins & Orland, supplies .50 

13364. J. H. Frandson, traveling expenses 53.30 

13365. W. L. Carlyle, traveling expenses 58.25 

13366. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for express 23.89 

13367. F. D. Farrell, traveling expenses 97.50 

13368. J. H. Frandson, traveling expenses 66.95 

13533. F. D. Farrell, traveling expense 68.80 

13534. E. V. Ellington, traveling expense 30.60 

13955. Booth Furniture Co., furniture 64.95 

13956. Ensign & Ensign, office rental 13.00 

13957. Arch Cunningham & Co., office fixtures 13.70 

13958. F. D. Farrell, traveling expense 63.85 

13959. W. L. Carlyle, traveling expense 52.60 

13960. Bursar, cash advanced to F. D. Farrell 1.86 

13961. W. H. Wicks, traveling expense 10.80 

14158. L. C. Aicher, traveling expense 30.50 

14159. W. L. Carlyle, traveling expense and supplies 96.50 

14160. E. E. Elliott, traveling expense 8.10 

Grand total $3,999.97 

AUXILIARY AGRICULTURAL STATION FUND— CLAGSTONE. 

7912. L. F. Childers, traveling expenses $ 11.85 

8439. E. A. Hunting, November salary 75.00 

8443. E. E. Elliott, traveling expenses 17.80 

9358. E. A. Hunting, traveling expenses 2.50 

9360. E. A. Hunting, December salary 75.00 

9739. J. C. Natvig, tools and supplies 38.72 

9743. McGowan Bros., stumping powder 58.75 

9932. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for labor 2.50 

9933. H. R. Davis, bungalow contract 161.05 



XLII 



APPENDIX 



No. Name and Service. Amount. 

10239. Humbird Lvimber Co., lumber for bungalow 105.20 

10242. E. A. Hunting, February salary 75.00 

10243. E. A. Hunting, January salary 75.00 

10433. E. A. Hunting, labor 3.00 

10434. E. A. Hunting, labor 61.00 

10885. E. A. Hunting, March salary 75.00 

11272. E. A. Hunting, April salary 75.00 

11546. Spokane Seed Co., seeds 12.00 

11790. J. C. Natvig, tools and supplies 36.64 

11791. T. J. Coffman Co., tools 11.00 

11794. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for stamps 2.00 

11981. Chas. Crockett, ox team and yoke 150.00 

12187. E. A. Hunting, May salary 75.00 

12190. McGowan Bros., blacksmith tools 15.83 

12191. Holley-Mason Co., supplies 9.50 

12192. Star-Mirror, printing 3.00 

12202. Wash. Grain & Milling Co., feed 12.80 

12205. J. Kraack, supplies 9.55 

12207. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for labor 222.05 

12208. W. L. Carlyle, traveling expenses 50.95 

12293. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for freight 7.50 

12371. E. A. Hunting, June salary 75.00 

12372. J. C. Natvig, supplies and tools 36.86 

12843. E. H. Hunting, July salary 75.00 

12844. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for freight 2.25 

12845. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for labor 212.75 

12847. W. L. Carlyle, traveling expenses 13.75 

13369. W. H. Heideman, August salary 75.00 

13380. McGowan Bros., supplies 2.56 

13381. J. C. Natvig, supplies 36.60 

13387. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for labor 117.50 

13389. W. L. Carlyle, traveling expenses 17.30 

13532. Bursar, labor 45.00 

13537. John Deere Plow Co., harrow 12.25 

13812. W. H. Heideman, salary 75.00 

13963. Caldwell Milling & Elevator Co., grain 2.04 

13965. F. I. DuPont De Nemours Powder Co., dynamite, fuse 

caps, etc 95.04 

13968. W. L. Carlyle, traveling expense 35.70 

13969. Bursar, labor 54.50 

13970. L. F. Childers, traveling expense 15.30 

13971. Bursar, labor 57.00 

13972. Bursar, labor 94.40 

13973. Bursar, labor 50.75 

Grand total $2,731.74 

AUXILIARY AGRICULTURAL STATION FUND— GOODING. 

4800. Dairy Dept. U. of Idaho, cream $ 1.70 

4801. Consolidated Wagon & Machinery Co., machinery 127.20 

4802. Mfvfr Bros., tools and supplies 28.30 

4803. Trullingor & Decker, blacksmithing 7.00 

4804. CJooding Forwarding Co., supplies and equipment 8.30 

4805. F. R. Gooding, team work 87.50 

4806. John Krai I, Jr., cash advanced for supplies 8.55 

5229. VoIg«r Sr-cd & Produce Co., seed 22.30 

r,2:iU. Fj. K. lOlliott, traveling expenses 15.45 



APPENDIX XLIII 



No. Name and Service. Amount. 

5231. Gooding--Ford Co., cash advanced for salary 117.50 

6129. John W. Krall. Jr., salary from May 15 to Aug. 1, 1909. . . 125.00 

6130. Trullinger & Decker, blacksmithing 11.70 

6131. Con. Wagon & Machine Co., machinery supplies 18.39 

6132. Boise Book & Music Co., supplies 5.25 

6133. Gooding Seeds & Feed Co., seeds 23.42 

6134. Weeter Lumber Co., lumber 14.22 

6135. The Idaho Leader, blanks 2.00 

6136. Idaho Coal & Commission Co., seeds 3.80 

6137. John W. Krall, Jr., cash advanced for seed and supplies. . 7.65 

6138. Lincoln County State Bank, cash advanced for labor.... 188.75 

6362. E. H. Sargent & Co., equipment 17.80 

6363. Meyer Bros., supplies 13.69 

6364. Fred W. Jordan Drug Co., supplies 3.15 

6365. Trullinger & Decker, blacksmithing 2.15 

6366. Evans & Greene, equipment, tank 5.50 

6367. Vogeler Seed & Produce Co., seed. 2.25 

6368. Gooding Livery & Feed Stables, team on farm 8.00 

6369. Gooding Livery & Feed Stables, livery 5.50 

6370. Gooding State Bank, cash advanced on time check 63.00 

6821. Boise City National Bank, cash advanced for wagon, 

team and harness 537.50 

6822. John Krall, Jr., cash advanced for supplies and express. . 18.45 

6823. E. E. Elliott, traveling expenses 63.30 

6824. Meyer Bros., supplies and equipment 7.30 

6825. Weeter Lumber Co., lumber 2.65 

6826. Idaho Hardware & Plumbing Co., supplies and equip- 

ment 9.00 

6827. Idaho Coal & Commission Co., oats and hay 6.45 

6828. Bostrom-Brady Mfg. Co., machinery 15.00 

7741. Gooding Mercantile Co., cash advanced on time checks. . . 90.00 

7742. Gooding Mercantile Co., cash advanced on time checks 

and oil 99.25 

7743. Dry Farm Association, seed 4.40 

7744. Meyer Bros., supplies 13.35 

7745. Gooding Seed & Feed Co., oats 8.76 

7746. Lincoln County State Bank, cash advanced on time check 3.75 
7913. Gooding Mercantile Co., cash advanced on time checks.. 47.50 

8437. Gooding Seed & Feed Co., oats 12.47 

8438. Gooding Mercantile Co., supplies 1.75 

8440. Lincoln County State Bank, cash advanced on time check 75.00 

8441. Gooding Feed Stable, livery 2.00 

8442. John Krall Jr., cash advanced for supplies and express . . 10.15 

8713. Gooding Mercantile Co., supplies 2.15 

8714. Frank Trullinger, blacksmithing 3.45 

9039. Meyer Bros., supplies 4.65 

9040. Gooding Seed & Feed Co., oats 4.19 

9041. Weeter Lumber Co., lumber 1.85 

9357. Chas. T. Manning, insurance 55.00 

9359. Gooding Mercantile Co., cash advanced on time checks.. 33.7S 

9361. Thompson Furniture Co., three chairs 3.00 

9362. Con. Wagon & Machinery Co., harness 6.60 

9737. John Krall, Jr., cash advanced for clock 2.00 

9738. Frank Trullinger, blacksmithing 6.25 

9740. Meyer Bros., supplies and equipment 18.20 

9741. Thompson Furniture Co., table 4.25 

9742. Gooding Seed & Feed Co., oats ; 5.15 



XLIV 



APPENDIX 



No. Name and Service. Amount. 

9931. First National Bank, cash advanced for express on 

sheep 30.15 

10237. John Krall, Jr., cash advanced for supplies and tele- 

grams 4.10 

10238. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for freight 3.10 

10240. Gooding Seed & Feed Co., oats 4.16 

10241. Gooding Livery & Feed Co., care of sheep 3.00 

10432. Gooding Mercantile Co., supplies 3.25 

10884. Con. Wagon & Machine Co., machinery 33.58 

10886. W. L. Carlyle, traveling expenses 106.24 

10887. F. D. Farrell, traveling expenses 47.40 

11542. Gooding Mercantile Co., seeds and supplies 3.15 

11544. Gooding Seed & Feed Co., oats and seed 24.24 

11545. Weeter Lumber Co., lumber 6.65 

11548. Meyer Bros., supplies 6.35 

11796. John Krall, Jr., traveling expenses, seeds and express. . . . 34.09 

12194. Gooding Townsite Co., trees 7.98 

12197. Gooding Seed & Feed Co., oats and seed 20.89 

12198. Con. Wagon & Machine Co., machinery and seed 94.21 

12199. Meyer Bros., supplies 6.65 

12200. Weeter Lumber Co., lumber 23.95 

12201. Frank Trullinger, blacksmithing 7.00 

12370. F. D. Farrell, traveling expenses and supplies 66.95 

12628. Consolidated Wagon & Machinery Co., implements 41.15 

12629. Gooding Seed & Feed Co., grain 14.12 

12630. Weeter Lumber Co., lumber 3.80 

12631. Gooding Milling & Elevator Co., grain 4.16 

12632. John Krall, Jr., traveling expense and supplies 9.25 

12844. Bursar, cash advanced for freight 1.59 

13118. Weeter Lumber Co., lumber 8.05 

13119. Meyer Bros., hardware supplies 1.65 

13120. Consolidated Wagon & Machinery Co., potatoes, etc 8.68 

13121. Jones of Binghampton, wagon scales 35.28 

13123. A. Thoma, seed grain 13.54 

13125. John Krall, Jr., trave ing expense and supplies 40.17 

13126. First National Bank of Gooding, cash advanced for labor 35.00 

13127. First National Bank of Gooding, cash advanced tor labor 75.00 

13128. Gooding Mercantile Co., sundry supplies 7.15 

13129. First National Bank of Gooding, cash advanced for labor 65.00 
13371. First National Bank of Gooding, cash advanced for labor 5.00 

13373. Gooding Water Works, water rent 12.50 

1 3374. Weeter Lumber Co., lumber 25.35 

13375. Gooding Water Works, sundry supplies 22.47 

13376. Meyer Bros., sundry supplies 2.60 

13377. Consolidated Wagon & Machinery Co., sundry supplies.. 10.30 
1 3382. Idaho State Nursery, trees 26.90 

13384. Settlers Reclaiming & Operating Co., seed grain 75.91 

13385. Fairbanks-Morse Co., grain testers 8.40 

13536. Gooding Water Works, water rent 12.50 

13540. F. D. Farrell, traveling expense 31.40 

13964. Ellis- Keystone Agricultural Works, thresher and cleaner 109.70 

13966. F. I). Farrell, traveling expense 15.00 

14161. Gooding Water Works, water rental 12.50 

14164. Young <Sr Bolte, bhicksmilhing 4.00 

14165. Wef'tcr Lumber Co., lumber 2.30 

14168. C^trander Lumber Co., lumber 9.22 



APPENDIX 



XLV 



No. Name and Service. Amount. 

14169. Gooding Mercantile Co., sundry supplies 2.57 

Grand total $3,412.84 

AUXILIARY AGRICULTURAL STATION FUND— CALDWELL. 

11273. L. C. Aicher, April salary $ 75.00 

11543. Amos Stitzel, labor 28.10 

11547. Caxton printer, stationery . . . 7.75 

11787. A. A. Faris, caring for horse 12.25 

11788. Ray R. Clawson, Agent, water rent 26.25 

11789. Caxton Printers, stationery 3.50 

11792. Caldwell Forwarding Co., seeds 16.72 

11793. Caldwell Milling Co., seeds 10.20 

11795. F. D. Farrell, express and supplies 21.94 

12188. S. D. Hartkopf, supplies 6.50 

12189. W. S. Whitehead, kodak 41.60 

12193. Caldwell Forwarding Co., seeds and supplies 20.62 

12195. Continental Oil Co., gasoline 11.04 

12196. Baker & Harris, gasoline 8.50 

12203. Caldwell Planing Co., stacks 8.25 

12204. Denver Fire Clay Co., apparatus 4.00 

12206. W. H. King, labor 60.60 

12373. Canyon Abstract & Trust Co., insurance 33.75 

12625. L. C. Aicher, June salary 75.00 

12626. L. C. Aicher, May salary 75.00 

12627. Central Lumber Co., lumber 6.65 

12633. F. D. Farrell, supplies 64.77 

12844. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for freight 5.90 

13115. L. C. Aicher, July salary 75.00 

13116. Stoddard Judd, labor 22.00 

13117. Caldwell Planing Co., equipment 15.24 

13121. Jones of Binghampton, wagon scales 35.28 

13122. Central Lumber Co., equipment 5.25 

13124. F. D. Farrell, traveling expense and supplies 39.50 

13370. L. C. Aicher, August salary 75.00 

13372. C. H. Hansen, supplies and labor 11.00 

13378. Boys Hardware Co., supplies 3.30 

13379. Caldwell Planing Co., supplies 2.50 

13383. Stoddard Judd, labor expense 21.33 

13385. Fairbanks, Morse Co., equipment 8.40 

13386. Central Lumber Co., lumber and supplies 18.75 

13388. F. D. Farrell, cash advanced for traveling expenses, la- 
bor, freight and express and tools 112.42 

13427. Stoddard Judd, labor expense 10.00 

13535. Ind. Long Distance Tel. Co., telephone rent 9.00 

13538. Idaho Imp. & Grain Co., tools and supplies 10.65 

13539. Idaho Imp. & Grain Co., tools and supplies 9.75 

13541. L. C. Aicher, cash advanced for supplies, blacksmithing 

and tools 33.73 

13557. W. A. Hall, balance for contract for dwelling 322.39 

13809. L. C. Aicher, salary 75.00 

13962. Paul Stampa, labor and material 76.40 

13964. Ellis-Keystone Agricultural Works, machinery 109.70 

13967. Stoddard Judd, salary 100.00 

14162. Stoddard Judd, board of laborers 16.00 

14163. Rocky Mountain Bell Tel. Co., telephone rental 3.40 

14166. Caxton Printers, cloth tags 4.20 



XL VI 



APPENDIX. 



No. Name and Service. Amount. 

14167. Central Lumber Co., lumber 3.60 

Grand total $1,852.68 

PURCHASE OF TYPICAL ANIMAL HERD FUND. 

10244. C. E. Parfet, two Jersey cows $ 450.00 

10245. O. R. & N. Ry. Co., freight 280.60 

10246. W. L. Carlyle, traveling expenses 75.30 

10247. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for labor 24.00 

10435. Joe C. Elstner, three Jersey cows 500.00 

10888. W. L. Carlyle, traveling expenses 4.85 

11549. Francis Jenkins, cash advanced for freight 20.10 

11982. J. S. Smith, three Holstein cows 645.15 

Grand total $2,000.00 

EXPENSE OF CADET CORPS— SEATTLE. 

4807. Spokane & Inland R. R. Co., cadets' R. R. fare $2,000.00 

U. OF I. IMPROVEMENT FUND, 1905. 

(For the erection and equipment of a Metallurgical Laboratory. ) 

111. General Electric Co., electrical equipment $ 87.22 

112. Union Iron Works, grate bars, 100 18.84 

113. Ross R. Sherfey, three frames 13.00 

114. General Electric Co., sundry electrical equipment 32.46 

115. Utah Mining Machinery & Supply Co., Std. callow tank 60.00 

116. Bursar, freight 43.56 

117. Standard Dray Co., hauling car of tailings 9.80 

118. Fred Lasater, one set blue prints 3.50 

119. Bursar, labor, wiring Metallurgical Laboratory 23.10 

120. Collins & Orland, hardware supplies 3.35 

121. Electrical Appliance Co., sundry electric supplies 11.56 

122. A. L. Vroman, plumbing labor and supplies 8.67 

123. Empire Hardware Co., hardware supplies 1.30 

124. Westinghouse Electric Mfg. Co., wattmeter 19.90 

125. Bursar, express and freight 1.90 

126. Denver Fire Clay Co., pyrometer. Metallurgical Lab 108.00 

127. A. L. Vroman, plumbing supplies and labor 3.67 

128. Royal P. Jarvis, Jarvis Lab. jig and counter shaft 44.24 

Total disbursements as per attached appendix $494.07 

Unexpended balance December 1, 1908 $494.07 

U. OF I. REBUILDING AND EQUIPMENT FUND, 1907. 

(For rebuilding.) 

173. A. S. Whiteway & Co., certificate No. 24 $ 868.68 

174. A. S. Whiteway & Co., certificate No. 23 1,012.66 

175. E. J. Clarke, supervision 12.81 

186. A. S. Whiteway & Co., certificate No. 25 6,771.48 

187. E. J. Tourtf^lotte & Co., supervision 49.72 

191. A. S. Whiteway & Co., certificate No. 26 1,357.66 

192. K. J. Clark(!, supervision 91.65 

193. George Rember, clock face 8.60 

1 94. E. J. Tourtellottf &. Co., suix-rvision 114.60 

205. , A. S. Whiteway & Co., certificate No. 27 730.40 



APPENDIX. XLVII 

No. Name and Service. Amount. 

209. A. S. Whiteway & Co., certificate No. 29 1,710.51 

211. J. E. Tourtellotte & Co., supervision 141.25 

212. J. E. Tourtellotte & Co., supervision 31.32 

213. Geo. H. Sutherland & Co., plumbing and heating, No. 28.. 3,513.48 

210. E. J. Clarke, supervision 91.65 

223. A. S. Whiteway & Co., certificate No. 30 4,192.90 

224. A. S. Whiteway & Co., certificate No. 32 6,383.61 

225. A. S. Whiteway & Co., certificate No. 31 3,560.84 

226. E. J. Clarke, supervision 91.65 

227. H. D. Mitchell, cut stcne 40.00 

228. Idaho Lime Co., sewer pipe 60.84 

237. A. S. Whiteway & Co., certificate No. 33 2,587.03 

238. J. E. Tourtellotte & Co., supervision 149.16 

239. Bursar, freight and labor 219.98 

240. H. Channon Co., iron 7.56 

241. Idaho Lime Co., sewer pipe 23.40 

242. E. J. Clarke, supervision .• 91.65 

243. Standard Dray Co., cartage 2.75 

254. E. J. Clarke, supervision 91.65 

255. J. E. Tourtellotte & Co., supervision 87.55 

256. A. S. Whiteway & Co., certificate No. 34 3,250.42 

257. Standard Dray Co., cartage 1.50 

258. Bursar, freight and express 71.81 

267. A. S. Whiteway & Co., certificate No. 35 4,267.04 

268. Bursar, surveying 34.81 

269. E. J. Clarke, supervision 180.00 

270. Pacific Safe Co., vault fronts 258.29 

271. Zumhof & Collins, blacksmithing 3.50 

272. Idaho Post, advertising 1.40 

273. Lewiston Tribune, advertising 3.30 

274. J. E. Tourtellotte & Co., supervision 153.14 

275. Collins & Orland, hardware supplies 4.45 

280. Whiteway & Co., certificate No. 37 . . 3,803.10 

281. Whiteway & Co., certificate No. 36 5,942.27 

282. ^\Tiiteway & Co., certificate No. 38 8,258.34 

293. J. E, Tourtellotte & Co., supervision 212.46 

294. G. H. Sutherland & Co., heating, certificate No. 38 2,102.58 

295. Geo. H. Sutherland & Co., heating, certificate No. 39 1,450.80 

296. J. E. Clarke, supervision .' 180.00 

297. A. L. Vroman, plumbing supplies 46.30 

300. Bursar, labor 206.49 

301. Pacific Builder and Engineer, notice 2.20 

302. Empire Hardware Co., hardware supplies 60.05 

303. S. W. R. Dally, steel 674.84 

304. Electric Appliance Co., electrical supplies 29.00 

305. Bursar, sewer expense 78.75 

309. Bursar, cash advanced for sundry labor 47.00 

316. American Fire Brick Co., 300 feet tile 30.00 

317. Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. Co., meters and trans- 

formers 46.31 

318. Bursar, cash advanced for sundry labor 118.75 

323. E. J. Clarke, supervision 180.00 

324. Empire Hardware Co., screens 6.96 

325. W. A. Lauder, cement 32.00 

326. American Fire Brick Co., drain tile 70.00 

327. Bursar, cash advanced for freight on tile 18.60 

328. Bursar, cash advanced for sundry labor 63.00 

331. Standard Lumber Co., lumber 318.20 



XLVIII APPENDIX. 

No. Name and Service. Amount. 

340. Cascade Gas & Electric Fixture Co., fixtures 2,061.25 

341. Bursar, cash advanced for freight 40.05 

342. Troy Lumber Co., materials 40.25 

353. Standard Dray Co., hauling .50 

374. J. E. Tourtellotte & Co., supervision 342.95 

A. S. Whiteway & Co., part payment, certificate No. 41. . . . 5,610.74 

Grand total $74,404.44 

U. OF I. REBUILDING AND EQUIPMENT FUND, 1907. 

(For repairs to building and grading.) 

266. Bursar, cash advanced for surveying $ 2.20 

308. Bursar, cash advanced for grading labor 257.26 

Grand total $259.46 

U. OF I. REBUILDING AND EQUIPMENT FUND, 1907. 

(For the purchase of books for the Library.) 

172. Spokesman-Review, subscription $ 5.00 

176. A. C. McClurg & Co., books 123.37 

177. A. C. McClurg & Co., books 1.88 

178. A. C. McClurg & Co., books 66.67 

179. P. Blackiston's Sons & Co., books 3.83 

180. A. C. McClurg & Co., books 83.68 

181. A. C. McClurg & Co., books 12.33 

182. A. C. McClurg & Co., books 32.36 

183. A. C. McClurg & Co., books 3.25 

184. Library Bureau, cards 14.25 

185. A. C. McClurg & Co., books 2.18 

188. Rand, McNally & Co., books 6.42 

189. Bursar, freight on books 13.90 

190. The H. R. Hunting Co., Inc., freight on books 13.50 

195. G. E. Stechert & Co., books 20.00 

196. G. E. Stechert & Co., books 154.44 

197. G. E. Stechert & Co., books 14.69 

198. G. E. Stechert & Co., books 4.28 

199. G. E. Stechert & Co., books 6.20 

200. International Text Books Co., books 4.41 

201. N. J. Bartlett & Co., books 15.00 

202. A. C. McClurg & Co., books 1.81 

203. Bursar, freight on books 13.38 

204. A. C. McClurg & Co., books 107.79 

206. Rand, McNally & Co., maps 51.75 

207. Bennett Newspaper (Magazine Agency), magazines 301.30 

208. John W. Cadby, books 75.00 

214. A. C. McClurg & Co., books .98 

215. The Boston Book Co., books 115.00 

216. A. C. McClurg & Co., books 11.62 

217. G. E. Stechert & Co., books 2.76 

218. Bursar, freight on books 42.93 

219. Caroline L. Himebaugh, books 60.00 

221. G. E. Stechert & Co., books 74.20 

222.. A. C. McClurg & Co., books 84.53 

229. A. C. McClurg & Co., books I.IG 

230. American School of Economics, books 13.50 

231. A. C. McClurg <fe Co., books 6.13 

232. Baker, Vorhis & Co., books 10.00 



APPENDIX. XLIX 

No. Name and Service. Amount. 

233. Society for the Promotion of Eng. Education, books 28.00 

234. G. E. Stechert & Co., books 25.11 

235. A. C. McClurg & Co., books 2.50 

236. Bursar, freight on books 7.35 

244. Bursar, freight on books 16.71 

245. G. E. Stechert & Co., books 14.15 

246. A. C. McClurg & Co., books 2.86 

247. G. E. Stechert & Co., books 73.11 

248. G. E. Stechert & Co., books 12.17 

249. A. C. McClurg & Co., books 74.85 

250. W. H. Wilson, books 19.00 

251. G. E. Stechert & Co., books 2.05 

259. Fredericli Loeser, books 9.25 

260. G. E. Stechert & Co., books 23.80 

261. Carnegie Library, books .* 5.40 

262. Publishers' Weekly, books 12.00 

263. G. E. Stechert & Co., books 129.90 

264. Bursar, freight on books 9.10 

265. Hicks- Judd & Co., binding books 16.46 

276. Wm. J. Gerhard, books 8.92 

277. Bursar, freight on books 18.64 

278. Library Bureau, cards and slips 38.75 

283. Hill Publishing Co., books 3.60 

284. A. C. McClurg & Co., books 1.00 

285. A. C. McClurg & Co., books .63 

286. A. C. McClurg & Co., books 42.12 

287. Hill Publishing Co., books 3.60 

288. Henry Malkan, books 25.00 

289. H. W. Wilson Co., books 19.00 

290. Bennett's Newspaper & Magazine Agency, magazines 6.45 

298. G. E. Stechert & Co., books 5.64 

306. Library Bureau, gummed labels 2.50 

307. A. C. McClurg, book and express , 4.32 

310. G. E. Stechert & Co., books 93.80 

311. G. E. Stechert & Co., books 156.12 

312. Bursar, freight on books 24.95 

313. McGraw Book Co., books 4.50 

319. Statesman Printing Co., publishing notice 10.50 

320. J. B. Lippincott, books 4.00 

321. B. A. Nichols, books 100.00 

322. Hicks- Judd & Co., binding books 143.27 

329. Bursar, freight on books 3.00 

330. Capital News, publishing notice 2.50 

332. Eastman- James Co., book stand 6.60 

333. West Publishing Co., books and cases 53.75 

334. G. E. Stechert & Co., books 76.52 

335. Am. Chemical Society, books 10.20 

336. G. E. Stechert & Co., books 33.38 

337. Bursar, freight on books 12.60 

338. American Lumberman, books 1.33 

343. G. E. Stechert & Co., books 26.00 

344. National Education Association, proceedings 2.00 

345. Charles Scribner's Sons, books 2.79 

346. Spokesman-Review, subscription 5.00 

349. Bursar, freight on books 22.94 

350. National Municipal League, dues 5.00 

354. Star-Mirror, books 1.50 



APPENDIX. 



No. Name and Service. Amount, 

355. Union Library Association, books 5.84 

356. A. C. McClurg & Co., books 69.58 

357. A. C. McClurg & Co., books 3.50 

358. A. C. McClurg & Co., books 70.73 

359. Irving Squire Publishing Co., books 75.00 

361. A. C. McClurg & Co., books 22.86 

362. Hicks- Judd & Co., binding books 124.16 

363. G. Schrimer, books 80.53 

364. Bursar, freight on books 16.51 

366. Statesman Printing Co., subscription 10.50 

367. Arthur H. Clark Co., books 8.00 

368. H. R. Hunting Co., books 4.95 

369. A. C. McClurg & Co., books 6.68 

370. Mutual Subscription Agency, periodicals 323.30 

371. A. C. McClurg & Co., books 1.68 

372. A. C. McClurg & Co., books .28 

375. H. R. Hunting Co., books 28.50 

376. A. C. McClurg & Co., books 4.44 

377. Star-Mirror, sign cards 2.70 

378. G. E. Stechert & Co., books 52.26 

379. Mutual Subscription Agency, periodicals 21.75 

380. Bursar, freight on books 9.43 

381. A. C. McClurg & Co., books 127.07 

382. A. C. McClurg & Co., books 2.51 

383. Bancroft- Whitney Co., books 7.50 

384. Engineering Magazine, books 2.00 

385. National Association of Cement Users, books 17.10 

386. A. C. McClurg & Co., books 3.17 

387. Bennett's Newspaper & Magazine Agency, books 22.75 

388. Library Bureau, books 13.00 

389. A. H. Grant, books 178.00 

390. Bursar, freight on books 14.48 

391. A. C. McClurg & Co., books 91.90 

392. Arthur H. Clark & Co., books 8.00 

393. National Educational Association, books 2.00 

399. Bursar, freight on books 5.60 

400. A. C. McClurg & Co., books 127.54 

401. Geo. Mischke, books 4.25 

402. A. C. McClurg & Co., books 85.38 

403. A. C. McClurg & Co 90.97 

404. Chas. Field, books 40.00 

405. A. C. McClurg & Co., books 267.28 

406. A. C. McClurg & Co., books 113.03 

407. A. C. McClurg & Co., books 70.3S 

408. G. E. Stechert & Co., books 4.76 

409. A. C. McClurg & Co., books 1.65 

410. Lovejoy & Lincoln, books 10.50 

411. H. R. Hunting Co., Inc., books 57.00 

412. Bursar, freight on books 18.59 

413. Bur.sar, freight on books 20.73 

414. Dodd, Mead & Co., books 6.30 

415. Mutual Subscription Agency, magazines 7.50 

416. Arthur H. Clark Co., books «. 8.00 

417. Harry N. Pratt, chart 6.75 

418. John Britnoll Co., Ltd., Quarterly Review 60.00 

419. Bursar, freight on books 9.77 

Grand total $5,487.60 



APPENDIX. LI 

U. OF I. REBUILDING AND EQUIPMENT FUND, 1907. 

(For permanent improvements for Auxiliary Station at Caldwell.) 

No, Name and Service. Amount. 

252. Idaho Improvement and Grain Co., 320 rods Ellwood 

fence $ 120.00 

253. Central Lumber Co., 132 fence posts and lumber 20.80 

279. Caldwell Lumber Co., fence posts, 119, lumber for canal 

bridge 42.36 

291. Central Lumber Co., 50 posts and lumber 12.40 

299. Idaho Imp. & Grain Co., 140 rods Ellwood fence 66.50 

314. A. T. Ralph, painting 8.50 

315. Idaho Imp & Grain Co., 80 rods Ellwood fence and 1043 

lbs. barbless wire 87.02 

339. C. J. Westcott, hauling cement and gravel. •. 26.50 

347. Central Lumber Co., lumber 4.80 

348. W. A. Hall, part payment on contract to build dwelling. . . . 240.37 

251. C. J. Westcott, hauling lumber 6.84 

352. W. A. Hall, part payment on contract to build dwelling. . . . 151.50 

360. Canyon Abstract & Trust Co., Ltd., insurance 7.10 

365. W. A. Hall, part payment on contract 198.00 

373. W. A. Hall, part payment on contract 93.75 

394. Elias Nelson, one bay mare and single buggy 175.00 

395. Standard Furniture Co., office furniture 50.00 

396. W. A. Hall, part payment on contract 160.51 

397. H. B. Maxwell, Underwood typewriter 60.00 

398. F. D. Farrell, traveling expense 37.70 

420. W. A. Hall, part payment on contract 609.34 



Grand total $2,200.13 

U. OF. I. INSURANCE FUND. 

50. H. N. Black, Supervising Architect $ 159.63 

54. Jones & Dillingham, balance Agr. Bldg., Colson & Son's 

account 49.70 

55. M. E. Lewis, balance Agr. Bldg., Colson & Son's account, 17,26 

56. E. J. Clarke, balance Agr. Bldg., Colson & Son's account .94 

57. McMahan & Scheyer, labor, Morrill Hall 7.00 

58. Idaho Lime Co,, building supplies, Morrill Hall 26.00 

59. W, P. Kepler, building supplies, Morrill Hall 24.20 

60. R. Hodgins, building supplies, Morrill Hall 2.92 

61. C, B, Walker, building supplies, Morrill Hall 73.86 

62. Moscow Electric Co., service, Morrill Hall 9,50 

63. P. H. Danley, sand, Morrill Hall 7.20 

64. Pacific States Tel, Co., service 15.26 

65. J. K. Seavey, labor, Morrill Hall 7.44 

66. A. L. Vroman, plumbing, Morrill Hall 5.42 

67. Standard Dray Co., service, Morrill Hall 9.82 

68. Phoenix Lumber Co., lumber, Morrill Hall 655.20 

69. Union Iron Works, building materials, Morrill Hall 181.36 

70. R. W. Morris, freight, Morrill Hall 140.00 

71. Humbird-Lumbird Lumber Co., building materials 831.76 

72. Moscow Hardware Co., building materials 293.68 

74. W. A. Lauder, building materials 393,16 

73. Holley-Mason Hardware Co., building materials 49.30 

75. M. F. Ziegler, labor, Morrill Hall 5.84 

76. G. G. Pickett, court costs. Phoenix Mill Co. vs. Regents.,,. 60.60 

77. G, G. Pickett, attorney fees. Phoenix Mill Co., vs. Regents, 200.00 



LII 



APPENDIX. 



No. Name and Service. Amount. 

78. Forney & Moore, attorney fees, Phoenix Mill Co. vs. 

Regents 199.06 

46. Lewis & MacLean, cash advanced for labor 28. IS 

33. O. A. Benedict, carpenter labor 49.50 

34. J. Hansen, labor 45.00 

35. Joe Weeks, hauling sand 5.00 

36. Fred Brewer, hauling sand 5.00 

37. E. McConnell, stone mason 8.25 

38. Transferred to Bursar's fund 4,687.11 

39. Transferred to Bursar's fund 2,643.86 

40. A. L. Vroman, plumbing and supplies 97.42 

41. W. A. Lauder, cement blocks 129.17 

42. Standard Dray Co., drayage 1.00 

43. Bursar, advanced cash for freight 87.27 

44. Bursar, advanced cash for sundry labor 171.43 

45. Potlatch Lumber Co., lumber 52.00 

47. Empire Hardware Co., hardware and glass 63.96 

48. Lord & Burnham, boiler and equipment 263.82 

49. Potlatch Lumber Co., lumber 15.70 

371. E. J. Clarke, traveling expenses 69.85 

372. E. J. Clarke, traveling expenses 35.00 

3 ?3. J. E. Tourtellotte & Co., traveling expenses 19.40 

120. A. S. Whiteway & Co., architects, estimate No. 41 (pend- 

22,252.79 



ing) 



Grand total $34,156.82 



UNIVERSITY IMPROVEMENT FUND, 1909. 

1. R. W. Morris, freight $ 901.50 

2. S. E. Hutton, salary 180.00 

3. Bursar, sundry labor 10.80 

4. Kewanee Boiler Co., boilers, etc 1,255.50 

5. Bursar, sundry labor 477.25 

6. S. E. Hutton, salary 180.00 

7. A. L. Vroman, sewer pipe 5.04 

8. W. A. Lauder, brick, lime and cement 531.55 

9. R. W. Morris, freight 37.05 

10. E. J. Willis, fire brick 168.35 

11. Madison Lumber Co., lumber 5.65 

12. Empire Hardware Co., supplies 23.55 

13. Empire Hardware Co., screws and nails .70 

14. Standard Dray Co., hauling 22.25 

15. Frank Neely, moving boilers 65.00 

16. Bursar, sundry labor 614.69 

17. Bursar, sundry labor 321.15 

18. W. A. Lauder, cement and plaster 500.00 

19. Empire Hardware Co., supplies 5.00 

20. Idaho Electric Co., electric supplies (contract) 533.28 

21. R. S. Loring, architect's fee 55.37 

22. I^ewi.ston Tribune, publishing notice 12.30 

23. Standard Dray Co., hauling 6.00 

24. Star-Mirror, publishing notice 6.15 

25. Idaho Post, publishing notic(i 5.85 

26. Statesman Printing Co., publishing notice 18.50 

27. R. W. Morris, freight 277.90 

28. Bursar, sundry labor 262.39 

29. Zumhof & Collins, blacksmithing 17.50 



APPENDIX. LIII 

No. Name and Service. Amount. 

30. Collins & Orland, hardware supplies 8.10 

31. Spokesman-Review, publishing notice 37.40 

32. Capital News, publishing notice 22.55 

33. Bursar, sundry labor •. 607.35 

34. Bursar, sundry labor 575.60 

35. Moscow Hardware Co., hardware supplies 4.93 

36. Crane & Co., pipe 434.24 

37. Holley-Mason Hardware Co., hardware 19.65 

38. "W. A. Lauder, cement and lime 435.70 

39. Zumhof & Collins, b acksmithing 19.25 

40. C. A. Hastings, advertising and lithographing 43.22 

41. W. A. Lauder, cement, lime and plaster 356.70 

42. Rhodes Iron Works, sash weights 46.87 

43. Union Iron Works, steel beams .* 18.50 

44. Bursar, sundry labor 574.30 

45. Bursar, sundry labor 189.40 

46. Bursar, sundry labor 556.14 

47. Bursar, freight 21.90 

48. H. Channon & Co., tools and supplies 95.17 

49. Halliday Machine Co., pump 83.00 

50. Moscow Hardware Co., hardware supplies 5.95 

51. W. A. Lauder, lime and cement 302.50 

52. Union Iron Works, supplies 76.33 

53. S. W. R. Dally, mortar collar 49.70 

54. H. L. Tracey, cedar po es 15.00 

55. M. L. Romig, labor on concrete 65.00 

56. Bursar, sundry labor 362.95 

57. Bursar, sundry labor 209.10 

58. Bursar, freight 5.76 

59. Bursar, sundry labor 395.72 

60. Bursar, freight 91.36 

61. S. E. Hutton, salary 180.00 

62. E. J. Clarke, salary 180.00 

63. A. L. Vroman, plumbing 576.00 

64. Standard Dray Co., cartage 6.25 

65. Pacific Builder & Engineer, publishing notice 12.60 

66. Crane & Co., pipe and supplies 18.62 

67. Washington Mill Co., windows and fixtures 98.00 

69. Portland Wood Pipe Co., wood pipe 160.39 

70. Crane & Co., pipe and fittings 18.80 

71. American District Steam Co., steam fittings 411.29 

72. Holley-Mason Hardware Co., chain, tongs, etc 13.90 

73. L. P. Schuh, hire of moving outfit 5.00 

74. Nott-Atwater Co., roofing and flashing 122.00 

75. Standard Dray Co., hauling 16.00 

76. Bursar, sundry labor 341.00 

77. J. B. Wadman, painting, etc 336.00 

78. J. B, Wadman, painting, etc 300.00 

79. R. W. Morris, freight 78.22 

80. Standard Dray Co., cartage 5.00 

81. J. B. Wadman,reoiling floors 6.00 

82. J. E. Riddle, electrical equipment 530.67 

83. Potlatch Lumber Co., lumber 61.30 

84. Western Marble Co., marble copings 11.00 

85. Empire Hardware Co., hardware supplies 22.45 

86. Idaho National Harvester Co., pipe cutting 2.00 

87. W. A. Lauder, cement and plaster 107.15 

88. Collins & Orland, sand paper .60 



LIV 



APPENDIX. 



No. Name and Service. Amount. 

89. Bursar, sundry labor 54.00 

90. Bursar, sundry labor 158.50 

91. Empire Hardware Co., hardware supplies 24.93 

92. Moscow Hardware Co., oil and sand paper 1.85 

93. Bursar, sundry labor 229.50 

94. Bursar, freight and express 14.35 

95. Madison Lumber Co., lumber 31.45 

96 Potlatch Lumber Co., lumber 84.50 

97. W. A. Lauder, cement and lime 49.60 

98. Empire Hardware Co., hardware supplies 11.25 

99. Collins & Orland, hardware supplies 33.85 

100. Moscow Hardware Co., hardware supplies 15.31 

101. Crane & Co., pipe fittings 154.62 

102. Crane & Co., pipe fittings 75.32 

103. Standard Dray Co., cartage 29.75 

104. R. W. Morris, freight 1,003.93 

105. Bursar, sundry labor 506.90 

106. Bursar, sundry labor 118.40 

107. Bursar, sundry labor 163.50 

108. E. J. Clarke, salary 91.65 

109. A. L. Vroman, plumbing and heating contract 982.00 

110. Standard Lumber Co., lumber 556.67 

111. A. L. Vroman, plumbing supplies 36.80 

112. Empire Hardware Co., hardware supplies 98.95 

113. J. B. Wadman, kalsomining 360.90 

114. Standard Lumber Co., lumber 160.88 

115. Myers & Topping, door and window fixtures 264.90 

116. Bursar, freight 2.60 

117. Bursar, labor 23.50 

118. R. S. Loring, architect 73.52 

119. A. S. Whiteway & Co., pitch 8.00 

120. R. S. Loring, architect 21.76 

121. Moscow Transfer Co., hauling 6.25 

122. E. J. Clarke, salary 91.65 

123. E. J. Clarke, salary 91.65 

124. Inter-State Construction Co., contract certificate No. 1.. 1,213.45 

125. Preusse & Zittel, architects 3,082.27 

126. Washington Mill Co., various frames 658.48 

127. Potlatch Lumber Co., lumber 7.65 

128. A. L. Vroman, ventilating registers 193.50 

129. Empire Hardware Co., door checks 38.50 

130. A. L. Vroman, plumbing supplies 24.16 

131. The Moscow & Rural Telephone Co., telephone 1.85 

132. Bursar, freight 52.35 

133. Idaho National Harvester Co., lathe work .50 

134. Bursar, freight 1.50 

135. Inter-State Construction Co., certificate No. 2 209.20 

140. A. L. Vroman, plumbing and supplies 31.80 

141. S. W. R. Dally, metal lathe and blackboards 607.29 

142. A. L. Vroman, contract heating and plumbing 635.00 

143. E. J. Clarke, salary 91.65 

144. Interstate Construction Co., contract 485.60 

145. J. E. Tourtfllotte (fe Co., supervision 89.35 

146. A. L. Vrornan, plumbing sui)i)li('H 56.86 

147. Empire Hardware Co., door checks, etc 44.60 

148. W. A. Lauder, lime, cem(!nt and plaster 9.45 

149. O. G. Vroman, r)lumblng and supplies 14.40 

150. E. J. Clarke, salary 91.65 



f 



APPENDIX. 



LV 



No. Name and Service. Amount. 

151. O. G. Vroman, radiators and plumbing 13.75 

W. F. Zumhof, blaclcsmithing 4.00 

O. G. Vroman, repairing- return mains 3.70 

T. A. Meeker, teleplione 20.12 

Standard Dray Co., drayage 2.75 

A. L. Vroman, plumbing and supplies 299.07 

H. H. Orland, pipe fittings 6.50 

A. L. Vroman, plumbing fixtures 4.37 

A. L. Vroman, plumbing fixtures 2.45 

The Michigan Pipe Co., casing tin lined 908.86 

Crane & Co., pipe fittings 142.30 

Crane & Co., pipe fittings 32.20 

Crane & Co., pipe fittings 3.12 

Standard Lumber Co., moulding : 18.00 

H. Channon Co., Davis pressure regulator 42.00 

Zumhof & Collins, blacksmithing 13.80 

Idaho National Harvester Co., pipe cutting and lathe work 2.50 

Empire Hardware Co., door locks and fittings 7.00 

Kewanee Boiler Co., boilers and equipment 656.70 

Empire Hardware Co., hardware supplies 14.50 

Troy Lumber & Mfg Co., large doors 31.50 

Moscow Hardware Co., piping supplies 24.11 

American Steam Gauge Co., gauges and supplies 5.68 

W. A. Lauder, cement and brick 365.35 

H. AV. Johns- Manville Co., Asbestocel covering 84.50 

Collins & Orland, boiler fittings 17.30 

Collins & Orland, hardware supplies 34.35 

Empire Hardware Co., rim night latch 3.00 

Standard Lumber Co., lumber 131.67 

Bursar, sundry labor 42.18 

Bursar, sundry labor 127.30 

Bursar, sundry labor " 471.85 

A. L. Vroman, plumbing and supplies 37.34 

E. J. Clarke, salary 53.10 

Troy Lumber & Mfg. Co., storm partition 78.50 

Crane & Co., heating plant fixtures 53.40 

C. E. Curtis, weather vanes 381.60 

G. H. Sutherland Co., heating fixtures 711.09 

J. E. Tourtellotte & Co., architect serwces (pending) 1,800.00 



152. 

153. 

154. 

155. 

156. 

157. 

158. 

159. 

160. 

161. 

162. 

163. 

164. 

165. 

166. 

167. 

168. 

169. 

170. 

171. 

172. 

173. 

174. 

175. 

176. 

177. 

178. 

179. 

180. 

181. 

182. 

183. 

184. 

185. 

186. 

187. 

188. 



Grand total $35,775.61 

LOCAL FUND, 1909-1910. 

(Receipts.) 

Unexpended balance December 1, 1908 .$ 961.84 

December 8, 1908, 2 per cent interest on daily balances 61.31 

December 29, 1908, interest on school district No. 5 bond from 

June to December 137.50 

December 30, 1908, 2 per cent interest on daily balances 151.13 

February 3, 1909, 2 per cent interest on daily balances 46.95 

February 12, 1909, interest on school district No. 5 bond from 

December 30.55 

March 12, 1909, 2 per cent interest on daily balance 49.67 

April 8, 1909, 2 per cent interest on daily balance 142.72 

May 6, 1909, 2 per cent interest on daily balance 37.21 

June 7, 1909, 2 per cent interest on daily balance 30.69 

June 1, 1909, 2 per cent interest on daily balance 35.83 

August 4, 1909, 2 and 41/2 per cent interest on daily balance 394.54 



LVI APPENDIX. 

September 9, 1909, 414 per cent interest on daily balance 283.58 

October 13, 1909, 4i^ per cent interest on daily balance 261.98 

November 6, 1909, return by Dr. Shattuck 1.00 

November 15, 1909, 414 per cent on daily balance 273.28 

December 15, 1909, 4 per cent on daily balance 243.68 

January 10, 1910, transfer from Bursary's fund 334.26 

January 15, 1910, 4V2 per cent on daily balance. 186.93 

February 3, 1910, 4% per cent on daily balance 211.71 

February 9, 1910, transfer from Bursar's fund 6.00 

March 3, 1910, 41/2 per cent on daily balance 179.79 

March 18, 1910, transfer from Bursar's fund 232.50 

April 15, 1910, 4^/^ per cent on daily balance 182.67 

May 15, 1910, 4i^ per cent on daily balance 137.32 

June 15, 1910, 4V2 per cent on daily balance 152.32 

July 15, 1910, 41/2 per cent on daily balance 132.79 

August 13, 1910, 41/^ per cent on daily balance 186.51 

August 31, 1910, 41/2 per cent on daily balance 271.87 

October 5, 1910, 41,^ per cent on daily balance 265.65 

November 1, 1910, 4% per cent on daily balance 271.58 

December 1, 1910, 4% per cent on daily balance. : 265.43 



m 



Grand total $6,160.73 

LOCAL FUND. 

(Disbursements.) 
No. Name and Service. Amount. 

2. G. W. Gale, hotel expense $ 20.00 

3. O. E. McCutcheon, Regent's expense 35.80 

4. Joseph L. Hill. Sec. and Treas. Agr. Col. Assoc, fee 15.00 

5. G. W. Gale, meals legislative committee 27.15 

6. James A. MacLean, traveling expense 112.10 

7. M. E. Lewis, Regent's traveling expense 122.3^ 

8. James A. MacLean, traveling expense 87.35 

9. W. R. Chedsey, traveling expense 12.10 

10. Bursar's account, meals, Board of Regents 7.00 

11. Bursar's account, music during commencement 25.00 

12. James A. MacLean, traveling expense 43.85 

13. Permeal French, traveling expense 2.30 

14. N. Williamson, sundry supplies, commencement expense... 17.16 

15. Bursar, telegrams and traveling expense, music, commence- 

ment expense 98.20 

16. Bursar, diploma ribbons, preparatory commencement and 

for selecting land for University on Coeur d'Alene Res.. . . 51.13 

] 7. Dr. H. E. Moore, traveling expense 20.50 

18. James A. MacLean, traveling expense 137.65 

19. James A. MacLean, traveling expense 89.00 

20. Ph. Soulen, traveling expense 42.65 

21. Ph. Soulen, traveling expense 91.50 

22. James A. MacLean, traveling expense 32.50 

23. E. M. Hulmf!, traveling expense 101.50 

24. Bursar, to Captain Butts, inspection of cadets 4.45 

25. Bursar, evergreens for commencement 3.00 

26. Bursar, telegrams 5.67 

27. Bursar, telegrams 12.43 

28. N. William.son, exhibit expense 4.75 

29. C. W. Colver, traveling expense 57.06 

30. J. S. Jones, traveling expense 19.30 

31. C. H. Shattuck, traveling expense 28.87 



4 



4 



APPENDIX. L.VII 

No. Name and Service, Amount. 

32. Ph. Soulen, traveling expense 27.75 

33. C. W. Colver, traveling expense 65.30 

34. Maintenance Ridenbaugh Hall 504.07 

35. C. H. Shattuck. traveling expense , 36.50 

36. S. R. Sheldon, traveling expense 28.20 

37. Jennie L. K. Haner, traveling expense 51.74 

38. Jennie L. K. Haner, traveling expense 17.75 

39. J. H. Fransdon, traveling expense 28.10 

40. J. H. Frandson, traveling expense 13.70 

41. J. H. Frandson, traveling expense 80.80 

42. G. E. Frevert, traveling expense 8,05 

43. R. S. McCaffery, traveling expense 39.10 

44. Permeal French, traveling expense 10.35 

45. Bursar, traveling expense for Smith & Soulen. 66,70 

46. Ph. Soulen, traveling expense 14.35 

47. D. W, Hannah, surveying tract in sections 7 and 8 50.00 

48. Latah Abstract & Title Co., recording deeds 4.40 

49. Bursar, freight and express 34.65 

50. C. E. Harvey, photographic work 4.00 

51. Bursar, freight 1-95 

52. Bursar, freight 8.17 

53. N, Williamson, Baldwin piano 283.68 

54. Potlatch Lumber Co., lumber 3.50 

55. W, H, Wicks, traveling expense 7.00 

56. James A, MacLean, traveling expense 55.85 

57. Bursar, freight and express 3.90 

58. R. J. Lyman, services in agriculture 50.00 

59. Dr. J. Aspray, services on account of diphtheria 10.00 

60. James A. MacLean, traveling expense 156.00 

61. Bursar, to L. A. Fenn, services in forestry 5.90 

62. Filer Piano House, one Hobart M Cable piano "R" 232.50 

63. J. H. Frandson, Secretary, Publicity 10.00 

64. A. W. Smith, ammunition and paper targets 16.75 

65. Rev. C. L. Chalfant, traveling expense and service 44.00 

66. Dr. E. C. Elliott, traveling expense and services 170.00 

67. Permeal French, traveling expense 101.14 

68. Ph. Soulen, traveling expense 8.55 

69. Bursar, telegrams, postage, etc 16.01 

70. G. L. Larson, traveling expense 83.60 

71. C. C. Tull, traveling expense 126.45 

72. Dairy Dept. U. of I., 20 Ibs.-butter for exhibit 8.20 

73. Geo. Creighton Co., sundry supplies for commencement. . . . 3.00 

74. Ridenbaugh Hall, meals account inter-scholastic meet 18.00 

75. David-Ely Co., Physical Education supplies 6.00 

76. Frank S. Dietrich, traveling expense for commencement. . . 35.40 

77. Bursar, music, commencement expense 26.50 

78. Bursar, recording deed 2.40 

79. Bursar, sundry hotel bill for commencement 9.30 

80. Idaho Post, commencement programs 10.00 

81. Standard Dray, moving chairs, commencement expense... 7.00 

82. Bursar, City Transfer & Storage, $2.00; evergreens, $4.00; 

Mrs. Agnes P. Caldwell, Dean of Women pro tem, $28.00; 

Star-Mirror, printing for commencement, $15.00 54.31 

83. James A. MacLean, traveling expense 78,55 

84. Ridenbaugh Hall, maintenance 250.00 

85. James A. MacLean, traveling expense 109.85 

86. W. L. Carlyle, rent on one-acre tract 50.00 

87. Permeal J. French, traveling expense 72.20 



LVIII APPENDIX. 

No. Name and Service. Amount. 

88. Parkins Bros. Cab Line, commencement expense 1.25 

89. Mrs. Julia A. Moore, rent on leased land 245.00 

90. Moscow Auto Co., Regents' traveling expense 9.50 

91. C. H. Shattuck, traveling expense 46.50 

92. Ph. Soulen, traveling expense 37.00 

93. C. C. Tull, traveling expense 38.05 

94. I, J. Cogswell, traveling expense 148.70 

95. E. M. Hulme, traveling expense 42.10 

96. Jean R. Wold, traveling expense 30.25 

97. Permeal French, traveling expense 33.25 

Total disbursements $5,180.19 



Unexpended balance 980.54 



Grand total $6,160.73 

LAW SCHOOL FUND. 

(Receipts.) 

Nov. 11, 1909, Student fees $ 308.00 

March 19, 1910, Student fees 35.50 

May 7, 1910, Student fees 25.00 

Oct. 14, 1910, by John F. MacLane 117.50 

Nov. 12, 1910, by John F. MacLane 24.25 

Dec. 3, 1910, Student fees 562.50 



$1,072.75 
(Disbursements.) 

No. Name and Service. Amount. 

79. R. Hodgins, telegrams .75 

80. John F. MacLane, salary 41.65 

81. Bursar, protest on check of Wm. E. Chambers 30.25 

83. Bursar, express 4.90 

84. Bursar, clerical labor 2.50 

85. Bursar, telegrams and postage 13.08 

86. John F. MacLane, traveling expense 35.65 

90. R. Hodgins, office supplies 29.80 

91. Little-Brown & Co., law books 43.65 

92. Callaghan & Co., law books 10.00 

93. Bursar, clerical labor 5.00 

101. Bursar, clerical labor 10.95 

102. Bursar, express .14 

103. Lawyers Co-operative Publishing Co., law books 2.50 

104. Star-Mirror, stationery 5.75 

105. Bursar, clerical labor 2.00 

106. West Publishing Co., law books 11.00 

107. John F. MacLane, salary 250.00 

108. Callaghan & Co., law books 28.00 

109. Bancroft & Whitney, law books 2.50 

110. T. H. Flood & Co., law books 10.00 

111. Bender-Moss & Co., law books 55.00 

112. R. Hodgins, office supplies 14.60 

119. Chas. Wilber, salary 150.00 

Unoxpend(!d balance, December 1, 1910 313.08 



$1,072.75 
COLLEGE FARM FUND. 

(Deposits.) 

Sept. 1, 1910, sale of farm products $ 12.00 



APPENDIX. LIX 

Sept. 26, 1910, sale of farm products 8.90 

Nov. 1, 1910, sale of farm products 42.70 



$ 63.60 
(Disbursements.) 

No. Name and Service. Amount. 

94. Moscow & Rural Tel. Co., phone rental $ 2.50 

Unexpended balance Dec. 1, 1910 61.10 



$ 63.60 
COLLEGE LIVE STOCK FUND. 

(Deposits.) 

Sept. 1, 1910, sale of live stock $121.64 

Oct. 3, 1910, sale of live stock 62.00 

Oct. 17, 1910, sale of live stock 175.00 

Oct. 24, 1910, sale of live stock 187.18 

Oct. 28, 1910, sale of live stock 35.00 

Nov. 16, 1910, sale of live stock 35.00 



$615.82 
(Disbursements.) 

No. Name and Service. Amount. 

95. American Berkshire Co., entry fees $ 2.00 

96. Madison Lumber Co., lumber 10.10 

97. Moscow Flour Mills, feeding stuffs 55.98 

98. Pacific Oil Mills, feeding stuffs 38.00 

99. Moscow Hdw. Co., hardware supplies 21.54 

100. Union Meat Co., feeding stuffs 42.53 

113. Mrs. L. L. Shurtz, labor 3.75 

114. Moscow Hdw. Co., hardware supplies 1.45 

115. American Poland-China Record, recording pedigrees 16.00 

116. N. Williamson, sundry supplies 7.65 

117. Lewiston Tribune, advertising 3.00 

118. Bursar, freight 29.30 

Unexpended balance December 1, 1910 384.52 

$615.82 



) 



I 





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